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valium

Best teacher in Hong Kong

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Heh...what do you mean by best violin teacher?

Dennis Kim comes to mind ... Concert Master HK Phil... Curtis graduate...teaches at HK Academy of Arts.

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Best? Who would say someone is the best? I would say if one doesn't practise, there isn't any best teacher for him/her. My ideal teacher is a inspiring one, like Leapold Auer.

Even if he/she is a solo artist, an orchestral violinist, or even a graduate from famous institute, that doesn't mean he/she can teach well. But of course, they have lots of experiences to share which would benifit their teaching.

Just my 2 cents .....

Guarneri in UK

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@valium I know this post is 12 years old now.

But I can't let an incorrect statement remain searchable on the net.

 

Lim Kek Tjang is primarily a violinist and is indeed a great violin teacher. I studied with him in Australia in the 1980's before he took the post in Hong Kong.

He studied at the Paris Conservatoire with Jacques Thibaud and Georges Enesco.

As you've said, he is also a conductor.

 

Regards, Dan

(Reference: The way they play, Vol 2. Samuel Appelbaum)

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@valium I know this post is 12 years old now.

But I can't let an incorrect statement remain searchable on the net.

 

He studied at the Paris Conservatoire with Jacques Thibaud and Georges Enesco.

 

 

There seems to be no record of that almost unbelievable feat.  Could you please clarify when exactly that happened ?

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The following is based on the Wiki page of Lim.

http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%9E%97%E5%85%8B%E6%98%8C

 

He was born in 1928, had a first violin lesson with his father, then studied with Ivan Fedoroff in Jakarta. After the WWII, he went to Conservatorium van Amsterdam to study with Jos de Clerck who is said to be a second-generation pupil of Ysaÿe. In 1950, he went to Conservatoire national supérieur de musique et de danse de Paris and took private lessons from Enescu.

 

He is no doubt a noted and well-respected conductor and violin pedagogue in the Chinese community, but his education background is not without controversy. He was forced to "retire" from (now named) Taipei National University of the Arts in 1992 after working there for one year. The reason cited was that his European diploma was not formally recognized by the Education Ministry of Taiwan.

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There seems to be no record of that almost unbelievable feat.  Could you please clarify when exactly that happened ?

Carl i think theres a little confusion,`` Ecole de Jacques Thibaut`` heres a post from Maestronet in 2000.

 

Posted 17 September 2000 - 01:01 PM

"Born in Indonesia in 1928. Begin violin training in 1936. At 18, he was awarded a scholarship to study the violin at the Amersterdam Consevatory of Music from which he graduated in 1950 with the highest honors. He then went to Paris to study at the Conservatoire National de Musique, Conservatoire International de Musique and the Ecole de Jacques Thibaud, again winning prizes and gaining distinctions. During this time he studied under Georges Enesco and gave recitals all through Europe. In 1956 he was appointed Musical Director and Conductor of the Djakarta Radio Orchestra. He later accepted the post of Principal Conductor of the Peking Radio Symphony Orchestra and became Professor of Violin at the Central Peking Conservatory of Music. During his stay in Red China, Lim Kek Tjiang gave recitals and conducted in every major city on the Chines Mainland. He went to Hong Kong in 1968 where he played violin, recorded Chinese violin music and became the director of the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra." Quoted from THE WAY THEY PLAY BOOK II[This message has been edited by Mark Dooley (edited 09-17-2000).]

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The following is based on the Wiki page of Lim.

http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%9E%97%E5%85%8B%E6%98%8C

 

He was born in 1928, had a first violin lesson with his father, then studied with Ivan Fedoroff in Jakarta. After the WWII, he went to Conservatorium van Amsterdam to study with Jos de Clerck who is said to be a second-generation pupil of Ysaÿe. In 1950, he went to Conservatoire national supérieur de musique et de danse de Paris and took private lessons from Enescu.

 

He is no doubt a noted and well-respected conductor and violin pedagogue in the Chinese community, but his education background is not without controversy. He was forced to "retire" from (now named) Taipei National University of the Arts in 1992 after working there for one year. The reason cited was that his European diploma was not formally recognized by the Education Ministry of Taiwan.

 

That's an amusing reason

 

Carl i think theres a little confusion,`` Ecole de Jacques Thibaut`` heres a post from Maestronet in 2000.

 

Posted 17 September 2000 - 01:01 PM

"Born in Indonesia in 1928. Begin violin training in 1936. At 18, he was awarded a scholarship to study the violin at the Amersterdam Consevatory of Music from which he graduated in 1950 with the highest honors. He then went to Paris to study at the Conservatoire National de Musique, Conservatoire International de Musique and the Ecole de Jacques Thibaud, again winning prizes and gaining distinctions. During this time he studied under Georges Enesco and gave recitals all through Europe. In 1956 he was appointed Musical Director and Conductor of the Djakarta Radio Orchestra. He later accepted the post of Principal Conductor of the Peking Radio Symphony Orchestra and became Professor of Violin at the Central Peking Conservatory of Music. During his stay in Red China, Lim Kek Tjiang gave recitals and conducted in every major city on the Chines Mainland. He went to Hong Kong in 1968 where he played violin, recorded Chinese violin music and became the director of the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra." Quoted from THE WAY THEY PLAY BOOK II[This message has been edited by Mark Dooley (edited 09-17-2000).]

 

"Ecole de Jacques Thibaud" makes it all clear for me. He could've taken private lessons with Enesco after 1949, a HUGE number of people did. "Lessons with Enesco" was something a bit industrial in nature. "Studied under Georges Enesco" is a cat of a completely different water - very few people could lay claim to that.  "Lessons with Enesco" were an extremely expensive proposal and of two kinds : one was allowed to watch or one could actually play and receive personal instruction. 

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That's an amusing reason

 

Errata: "European diploma" should be "European education background", and that sentence could mean a lack of proper diploma on Lim's part.

 

Still a silly and unfortunate decision on the government's part.

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Still a silly and unfortunate decision on the government's part.

 

 

I'd call it impertinent and downright disrespectful besides inept. It has been proven endlessly ( and ignored about as many times ) that the singular reason for long term success in classical music is the establishing of a "school".  And you can't establish a school without people like Mr. Tjang.

 

Very unfortunate situation.

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