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Making Rosin Oil


DelDuca
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I can't point you to a source of how-to, but from the discussions I've read in various places it sounds a bit like refining your own gasoline from crude oil, so you might want to just buy it, or up your insurance a bit before you start. :-)

Kremer Pigments (NYC) sells something of the same name, but the word is that it's not quite the same stuff--it's a cruder form--but some people are using it and think it might be OK. Once you use the real thing, you could give it a try and see if it works for you. . .

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Rosin oil is made from the fractional distillation of rosin and as such is probably not something that can be done simply. You can read about rosin oil and other varnish ingredients at: http://www.nrinstruments.demon.co.uk/Varn.html

Terry

[This message has been edited by Terry Maurice (edited 04-21-2002).]

[This message has been edited by Terry Maurice (edited 04-21-2002).]

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Yes, I am getting it from NRI. They are still cooking up the stuff in their kitchen as it seems, making it a small part of their business.

Kremer does not handle the rosin oil any longer, but is selling Sandarac varnish as a substitute. I don't think NRI should have the world wide monopoly, but if I can't find out how to process it by myself, they have it!

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It's quite easy to do it if you have the facility: a thermostatically controlled hot plate, a cooking ware (or glass) with a long exhaust pipe cooled with water jacket, temperature: 250-300 C, no oxygen in the pot while the vapor still hot (not fire but will oxidize the oil), a little catalyst such as iron and manganese oxides would help.

You probably could do it with an old kettle and a regular hot plate set at low heat. Heating rosin without oxygen converts it into rosin oil. Tip to clean the cookware: wipe it with paper towel while hot.

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Hi David ,it isn`t that easy and the product you would get with your suggestion would be very impure and pretty unless as Terry mentioned ,it is done by Fractional Distillation and you need to distill off the thing you don`t want as well as the fraction you do want which will come over at a certain temperature usually within a 10-20 degree range or less for a purer product.Home chemistry can get very dangerous and adding Mno2 or similar products if not careful could produce peroxides which mean explosions.

So my advice unless yor a chemist don`t mess with organic chemicals and oxidisers /catalysts.

Expensive but safer to buy it.

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They are both polymerizing long chained plant lipids(drying oils). They both are absorbed by the wood the same manner and add weight alike. They both polymerize to harden in the same way. Linseed oil that is anaerobically polymerized into stand oil seems to me much like the Rosin oil that is anaerobically polymerized into bloom oil. Both stand and bloom will "crawl out" of their bottles if one is not careful, do to their molecules' long chain structure. There are many differences of course but their similarities make me wonder. I have used and like both.

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Crawling is a siphon like action in which a drip on the outside of the bottle can pull the oil on the inside up and over the edge of the bottle and onto your bench. Like a siphon the oil drip must be connected continuously in a line back into the bottle. If you tip and pour then just set the container back down the oil will crawl. If you wipe the top of the container it will not. The partially polymerized molecules are in effect very long. Think of the oil as very slippery long spaghetti that sticks only to other spaghetti ends and try to pour just a little onto your plate from the pot. I think the proper term is polymer hysteresis but I am not quite sure( Thirty odd years since Chemistry class)

[This message has been edited by pvnasby (edited 04-25-2002).]

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I haven't seen the "crawling" of oil, but sounds interesting to me, like the superfluid behavior of liquid helium when cooled below the critical temperature.

I and a friend cooked a lot of rosin some 20 years ago. He had a connection with a paint factory here and we got a big sack of rosin. I don't use R. oil anymore. I use clear varnish to cover the ground. I still use the residue, let's call it rosin pitch a dark substance having the consistency of a creamed honey, to make varnish (similar to amber pitch).

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