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Heinrich Th. Heberlein Jr. Violin

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I have a violin with this label and is dated 1899. I cannot find any information about this maker and I would appreciate if some one could give some ideas about this maker. Thanks.

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I too would like to know more on the family of the Heberlein's. I know that there were several generations of this family making violins, and I also own a Friedrich August Heberlein Violin #180 1903 and was supposed to be the son of one of the family makers. In my case the violin was purchased through the sears catalogue and is generally my main performance instrument. Great sound, bold and bright. Plum color and excellent flame.

I would like to know more about your Heinrich Th. Heberlein Jr. model, color, sound condition, ect?

Keep us posted!

Harlan

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Here's what Henley says(be patient, there was a Battalion of Heberleins)

Bear in mind that Henley died in 1957, and, although the book was printed in 1973,some of these makers were still living when this information was compiled.

ALBERT-born 1898 Worked Markneukirchen. fairly good workmanship.attractive varnish

ALBERT THEODOR Born 1880 Worked Markneukirchen Splendid modeling, Cremonese and Neapolitan models.

ALBERTO- born 1860 Markneukirchen worked in Mexico, 1905. refined workmanship, orange to red spirit varnish.

ARNOLD made bows(no dates given)

CARL AUGUST 1805-1875 Markneukirchen Excellent commercial grade instruments. official maker to the Dresden court.

CHRISTIAN AUGUST 1814-1894 Markneukirchen Made really fine double basses.

CHRISTOPF 1690-1761 Markneukirchen. Very ordinary violins & cellos. Usually yellow varnish.

CONRAD Born 1878 moved to the US in 1903. He worked at Chicago, Philidelphia and St Louis.

Ernst J. Born 1866 Good maker, undated work

Heinrich Richard Born 1847, worked at Markneukirchen 1880-1920 Honored for some very good double basses.

(sheesh, there are a lot of these guys. I hope you appreciate this info)

Heinrich Theodor Junior 1843-1910

This is the largest entry of all the Heberleins. Basically, he made commercial instruments that were a great step above the typical Markneukirchen products.

He knew that good business instincts alone weren't enough, and didn't stint on quality.

He won many medals, imitated the masters well,invariably used perfect wood,made an excellent violin, even though it was "made to a price"

Also made violas, cellos, and bows, all low-priced, but excellently made

The labels are of two types:

Heinrich Th. Heberlein Jun.

fecit Markneukirchen. anno 1XXX

(with initials double circled in right-hand corner)

and

Heinrich Th. Heberlein Jr.

Markneukirchen 1XXX

Imitation <famous maker name>

(Initials placed in a design)

Johann Gottlob 1782-1856 Excellent work, argued as the best of the Markneukirchen school(Henley didn't think so, but some did, apparently)

Max 1869-1942 Worked at Lyon & Healy.

Paul, Son and pupil of Heinrich Thodor Jr.(nothing but the name is listed for paul)

Ludwig Fritz- 20th century, made cheap violins, plain material, ordinary workmanship

Richard born 1862, established in Nuremburg in 1894. Extremely well thought of maker. According to Henley's apparent opinion, the best of the Heberleins.

Well, that's it.

All the legitimate Heberleins. Frederich August is not mentioned in Henley's, so it is probably a fake name, but I can't say for sure.

I bet there's Heberleins working now, so you could probably ask them whetehr frederish august was a real fellow or not.

This was a lot of work.

I hope the info is of interest.

All best

Philip Taggart

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Philip:

Thank you, yes I really do appreciate this. Interesting too, the Fredreich didnt appear, and leaves me wondering now. Knowing this was purchased through sears, sure could be a fake label installed. I know they did that a lot on imports. I will continue to investigate the Fredreich, as when I was young, I had run across a book which listed Fredreich as well as like you found a lot of the family. THe one I had my hands then had like 2 full pages of Heberleins listed, but this list you have is the one main family. I better start investing in some good research books.

THank you so much. Your a great chap Philip.

Harlan

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I love a good mystery, and after reading the post you suggested Mark, I got my magnifier out and took a really close look. Now I hadnt looked at the label in my violn for probably 25 years, and back then read it as Heberlein, but alas!! Fredrich August Heberlin 1903 is what it says. Live and learn smile.gif no matter it is a "fine" sounding instrument. I even took pics of the label if any one is interested. My grandfather bought this one at sears in 1904, for around $25, and was actually paid with in trade of a rifle to sears for it. Each instrument has a history behind it, some interesting, some not so.

Thanks again

Harlan

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I`m sure if i recall there is still a Heberlein family of luthiers still in Germany,i came across it on the net but cant find it when i looked yesterday.

That would be a good source if you can find it,i also read a site from a luthier in California whos teacher worked with the Heberleins in germany.

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Thanks for all the infomation and discussion.

I have a good look at the label and it says:

Heinrich Th. Heberlein Jr.

Markneukirchen 1899

Imitatiion: Antonius Stradiuarius

with his initial in a design.

I had a local violin repairer (I am from Australia and there are not many luthier here at all) and he said that the violin is a genuine Heberlein.

The colour is yellowish brown, one piece back, very nice flame. Since I am not a good violin player (this is for my daughter to use in about 5 years - she is on a 1/8 size at present), I can't really tell how good the sound is. I also have a Bavarian Violin which I posted some questions earlier - that one sounds a lot stronger than the Heberlein. My daughter's violin teacher said that the Bavarian violin is an excellent orchestra instrument. She did not really said much about the sound of this Heberlein. I still need to get a new sound post and a new bridge for it - will only happen in about a months time because the violin repairer is not free.

ML

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The 1912 J. W. Jenkins & Sons catalog lists genuine Friedrich August Heberlin violins from $70.00 to $250.00 The 1977 value of these fiddles was $800.00 to $2,500.00. Would be quite a bit more now! smile.gif

Don

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The Heberleins sure are a mystery. My favorite fiddle is labeled Heinrich E. Heberlein Jr. 1922 (actually 1921, but someone drew a 2 over the 1). People with varying degrees of expertise who have looked at it tell me it's worth anywhere from firewood (provided it's not too cold a night) to about $3,000. The person who guessed the high end claimed there is a distinction between fiddles with the name and fiddles with a label that says "from the shop of..."

The important thing is that I like it and it likes me. What else matters?

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quote:


Originally posted by:
harlantk
I love a good

mystery, and after reading the post you suggested Mark, I got my

magnifier out and took a really close look. Now I hadnt looked at

the label in my violn for probably 25 years, and back then read it

as Heberlein, but alas!! Fredrich August Heberlin 1903 is what it

says. Live and learn

smile.gif

no matter it is a "fine" sounding instrument. I even took pics of

the label if any one is interested. My grandfather bought this one

at sears in 1904, for around $25, and was actually paid with in

trade of a rifle to sears for it. Each instrument has a history

behind it, some interesting, some not so. Thanks again

Harlan

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Regarding Friedrich August Heberlin violins: I could be remembering incorrectly, but I seem to recall that this name appears on oval labels. If this is the case, Friedrich August Heberlin was a trade name used by the Rudolf Wurlitzer Company. You will also see on the label a logo made of the letters R, W, C and O. Wurlitzer also used other names on the same style of oval label, including William Chadwick and several others.

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I have a Heinrich Th . Heberlein Jr. cello. I have never seen another cello by this maker, but have seen some violins of either him or his family members. My cello does not have a date on the label, and I have often wondered how old it is. It's varnish is a yellow-brown, and the cello itself is of large proportions. It is a Strad model, but somehow it isn't really such a convincing copy. It is very nicely worked however, so I assume the maker was deliberately deviating from the Strad design, since no part of it looks unintended. If anybody has a photo of a Heinrich Th. Heberlein jr. cello, I would be very interested in seeing it.

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I am a new user.  I don't know how to use this website.

 I tried to reply to an entry about Heberlin Violins and now

my name took the place of Hablan.  I'm sorry.  vicky

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