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violin making kits


Rich
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You can buy Hofner kits from International Violin Co. in Baltimore, Stewart MacDonald in ??? or International Violin Supply in Oklahoma. They all sell the same kits, which require a fair amount of work and are capable of yielding a nice violin in the end. You'll have to: inlay the purfling, scrape the top and back, sink the edge if you wish, graduate the plates, fit a bassbar, glue the top plate to the ribs, set the neck, remove and reglue the fingerboard, apply varnish, install pegs, fit a soundpost, fit a bridge, fit an endbutton, file the nut, dress the fingerboard, adjust the tailpiece fastener, and probably a few other things I missed. If you wish to make the scroll look less commercial you can take a few swipes with a gouge. The kits usually come in two grades. The lower grade has minimally figured wood and linings which run over the blocks. The better kits have nicely flamed wood and linings which end at the blocks. With either kit you can have a good learning experience and hopefully, a good looking and sounding violin in the end.

Barry

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Rich

Get real....!You can get a kit from many places. but you need some tools not readily available. Some Calibration Tools, and caliper for graduation.

But if you are not serious..,real serious about the discipline of String Instrument Construction , you can buy a complete white violin from, SVS Tonewoods. but be advise ....!This instruments are like a Pandoras Box

Good Luck

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Perhaps the easiest way to try one's hand is to get a violin in the white. Pop the top. Graduate the top and back according to a scheme of one's own or a standard pattern (one can make quite good graduation calipers). Fit a bass bar, again a standard one, one of your own, whatever! Glue it back together (one can make one's own spool clamps). Work the scroll, the F hole wings and edges, etc. Finish. Set up with fingerboard etc. Then see what it plays like. This process lets one experience much of the detailed wood work in minature, tests one's finishing skills, and relies heavily on basic setup skills.

Search on the web and you'll find some suppliers.

Steve

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You'll need: GOOD sharp knives, sharpening stones, a few scrapers, probably a bending iron for the purfling, a gouge or two, a metric ruler, a caliper, finger planes, chalk to fit the bassbar and neck, a gluepot and some hide glue, clamps for the bassbar, closing clamps, clamp to glue the top to the upper block, chisels to cut the neck mortise, clamp to glue the neck in place, fingerboard clamps, pegbox reamer, peg shaper, nut file, sandpaper, varnish and brushes, several cups of coffee and some good advice.

I don't know of any 'toolkits' which are prepackaged. A violin supply company should have most everything you need on a piece by piece basis.

Best of luck.

Barry

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Tools for working up a white violin are not outrageous. A butter knife for getting the top off. A selection of scrapers (make from a stainless drywall spreader). A plane. A couple of gouges. Make a graduation measurement device or use a drill press as a graduation drill. Sharp knife. Varnish and brushes. Nothing too extreme.

Steve

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  • 4 weeks later...

A glue pot can be made with a small ceramic sake cup or tea cup to which add the glue pearls and some water, then put the cup in a saucepan and heat on the stove. Put the glue brush in the cup and carry the whole saucepan with cup and brush to your (nearby)workbench when the glue is hot.

For a bending iron I have used a short length, 3 or 4 inches, of galvanized pipe (1/2 and or 3/4 diameter)heated in a saucepan full of boiling water. Hold the pipe with vise grips or whatever.

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A kit from Internatiolal Luthiers Supply Inc. Tulsa Oklahoma will be your best bet or buy and old junker and rebuild it.Phone 918-835-4181 and they will send you a free catalog.They have a vinishing kit with enough material and the instructions how to finish a violin .You can also buy a small book by H Brown that shows all the steps on graduation and how to make a guage and spool clamps.You can buy almost all the tools you will need from them.A peg shaver and reamer a sound post setter and perfing tool will be the bare necessary tools you will have to buy unless tou got lots of dough..This is how I got started.The most important thing is to learn to take your time .

I use an old electric coffee pot and an old metal measuring cup to heat my glue and a bending iron can be made by using a length of thick wall brass or copper that will fit over the tip of a butane torch being very carful not to get it too hot.

Buy you a kit and get started.No one I know of was born knowing how to be a luthier.

Monroe

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