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  1. For those who have seen my posts, you already know I'm very new to violin making, but am enthusiastically enjoying the frustration and the challenge. I'm going to pretend my 1st attempt at building a violin doesn't exist, as I would be embarrassed to show the disaster it's turning out to be. We'll call this next one "1a" I guess, and I'm optimistically assuming this one will be better. For this first (non-existent) violin, I built my form based on a photo of the 'Forma PG'. I didn't realize however until after building the rib structure and cutting the outline of the plates, that this photo has the distortions inherent in all photos... never the less, it is and was a tremendous learning experience simply building an instrument... er, if it would have existed. I intend to soldier on until it's complete, before casting it into the fire never to be heard from again. I would actually keep it as a reminder of my venture into the world of violins if it existed. For my next 1(a), I have used the 'Forma P' Frankensteined together with the 'Forma PG', and I've made so many adjustments so many times, for now we'll call it version 3? At some point I just printed it out and used it as I could meddle with things forever. The second is the Strad 'Forma P' sort of "as is". I've taken the forms from the "Forma by Addie" and tweaked them to a degree in Adobe Illustrator. To smooth out the dings and bumps, as well as to tweak the block sizes I guess to something I think might be ok, though I have no idea what a good neck block for example should be. I'm going to call it roughly 60mm X 18mm. Hopefully it will work. I've also squared up the corner blocks, though now I see how angling them could assist in getting the grain direction correct. I've messed up two of the P corner block angles, but I've glued a thin piece of "extra" (broken) rib to straighten things out on one at least. My Frankenmould which I'm calling my A mould, is built using a walnut plywood (roughly 12mm thick or 1/2in), because of course using walnut moulds is I'm sure the secret of Stradivari! I've used double sided tape to stick the printout to the wood before cutting it out, hoping that it will not deform as a wet glue might do, though the plywood isn't as truly flat as I would like. My P mould is made from actual walnut lumber, jointed to produce a handy, permanent centerline. This is roughly 14mm thick, I say roughly because I did the old fashioned hand plane thicknessing from 4/4 dimensional lumber and it's probably not as precise as I would like. For this I taped down the printout, and very carefully scribed the outline with a knife, hoping this will hone my skills for purfling later. It seems I may have trouble with putting in both sets of linings with the thicker form, but I'm sure I can get through it somehow. I've maintained the asymmetries from the forms, as I don't feel qualified to 'fix' Tony Strad's work, and I actually believe them to be purposeful. (I do have some ideas about disproving this wild theory in the future... once I can actually build something worthwhile.) I've already jointed the backs for both instruments, the first (for the P), I may have gone a little thick with the hide glue and there seems to be a bit of a visible glue line. I did also pretreat the joint with hide glue before glueing. I did the same with the second (Frankinmould A) but a slightly better job of it so not the seam like the first. I used my trusty Lie-Nielsen rip saw, which I love and works very well. Though my concerns about the blade width and tonewood dimensions might lead me to try and make my own rip saw for this purpose. For now that would interfere with making progress on my violin(s) so that's a future project. I do have a frame saw, with a presumably thinner blade, but I'm not as confident or comfortable with a frame saw, particularly for book matching expensive tonewood. For these backs I'm still over 20mm thick, and only seemed to lose about 1/8in (3mm) from the sawing, so it's fine. I have my rib wood selected, though I wish they matched more closely the wood from the back and neck... not sure how often tonewood suppliers actually give back, neck and ribs from a single piece of maple. Incidentally I got this particular tonewood (p) from https://www.tonewoodforviolin.com, and for the Frankenmould, from https://www.internationalviolin.com. I do like seeing and selecting the wood from the websites, though I'm not sure I know what to look for. I do prefer a broader, random flame pattern to a tight and consistent one, but I do like both pieces. I didn't measure the density of the back for this project, but will in the future. The tops (not yet jointed) are .38 and .40 respectively. The lighter top has a couple of darker lines along it's length. I'm not overly bothered by this but I wonder if it could be lightened somehow. I've also accumulated more tools than I have found places for, so my bench is more often a disaster than a good working environment, but I'll try to hide the mess from view when sharing photos of my progress. With any luck, I'll at least learn some more lessons about 'what not to do'... and eventually the 'what to do, and how to do it' will be all that's left! Hopefully I don't destroy too much tonewood in the process. This will take a long time as I'm not afforded many opportunities to get in the shop these days, but I truly enjoy the work and hope that I can get to the bench as often as possible. My Frankenmould is attached for those interested... I realized after the fact that I can't cut out the block templates if they're adhered to the mould... Frankenmould-A-v3a.pdf
  2. This thread is about building a violin which doesn't follow a symmetric outline for ergonomic purposes. At the same time the weight was initially kept at the bare minimum to find out in which parts of a violin mass and accompanying stiffness is needed to produce a 'good' sound. It was the idea that starting from unconvential patterns and working with a different concept would necessarily and automatically lead to failure. Thus this would have become additional proof to the idea that the violin seen as a concept of classical makers can't be improved. While this seemed to be true at the beginning, it came clear in the continuation of various constructional experiments, that a different construction concept at least seems to be possible. As said, it was in the first place not the goal to produce a violin with 'superior' sound characteristics but while experimenting with the violin useful hypothesis were elaborated to link constructional features with various characteristics of the sound. Princples were tested and judged by playing the instrument as well as recording sound spectra for objective comparison. Currently this project finds itself at the turning point from being merely experimental. (Andreas Preuss, Tokyo, 2021/5/11) ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Though the original introduction of this thread has outlived itself, I believe that the general mindset is still valid. Serious violin making must not always follow already explored paths and even if there is the risk of making something foolish, there is ALWAYS the benefit of learning from unusual experiences. Everything below is the unaltered original text of this thread: Here you can follow me constructing the super-light violin. It will be the craziest thing I ever made and please don't take it too seriously. It is the violin maker joke from my workshop. But at least I am serious enough to make it the most professional way I can imagine. So following the footprints of Antonio Stradivari everything starts with a drawing. I decided to throw over board symmetry as well and came up with the funny design below. To save weight the length is only 351mm and all distortions follow the 10 percent rule which means that one f-hole is 10 percent longer than the other.
  3. https://www.classicfm.com/discover-music/instruments/violin/luthier-dishwasher-violin-torture-instagram/ I must be missing something; this seems incredibly stupid, sort of the insane art that was really trash, popular in the 80's or so. Or has classic fm stooped to new lows?
  4. Hi All, I’m privileged to be the owner of a Tres Amigos violin (2013, Strad Model) made by Ryan Soltis, Antoine Nedelec, and Jeff Phillips for Julie Reed-Yeboah’s contemporary violin exhibition in New York. Every year (theoretically, ) the trio of first-class makers go through rotations of who does what. In the case of my current violin, the scroll/varnish is by Ryan, the back and ribs are by Antoine, and the top is by Jeff. After they completed three Strad models, of which mine is the second, they moved on to Del Gesu models. When the time for the second DG model came around, which would be the twin to mine in terms of who made what, I had expressed a lot of interest in the fiddle as a companion to my current Strad. Fast forward to 2020 and here we are with the fiddle completed! When I asked the trio if they would be okay with me posting the pictures, the condition was that I give Antoine a mohawk in one of them. VOILA.
  5. Hello everyone, I am about to embark on restoring this violin to playable spec and keen to understand where/when it was made. Originally when i purchased it five years ago from a seller who advised that it had been appraised and is "most likely" a circa late 1920's German Trade violin. Frustratingly the label doesn't tell my inexperienced eyes very much. If anyone has the skill to assess what it might be /when/where it was made I would be rapt. Otherwise any suggestions on who in Melbourne Australia is best placed to take a look at it (for a fee naturally). Thanks
  6. How would Don age the "wood?" Paddy Murphy as he appeared on Frank Hall's show: https://www.theviolinchannel.com/violin-made-entirely-from-car-parts-ireland-1972-paddy-moran/
  7. A fellow violinist recently noticed that a tiny part of my bridge had chipped off and was horrified that I was continuing to play my instrument rather than getting it repaired immediately. A cursory Google seems to suggest that this part of the bridge is called the kidney wing, but I may be wrong. It does not, to my eyes, seem to be crucial to the structural integrity of the bridge, but what do I know? Do I need to get my bridge replaced ASAP or is this not a big deal?
  8. So my dad inherited this violin in 2007 after my grandfather passed but it’s been stuck in the case for 14 years. I decided to take it out and I’ve made the decision to play violin, unfortunately it needs repairing so I’m going to have to wait. The only thing(s) in the violin is a date saying that it was repaired in 1851 and a paragraph of writing near the neck of the violin which I cannot read. There is a label but it seems to be put in after the repairs were done because the company that the label belonged to was founded in 1935, so it predates the company by 80 odd years just by the repair, I’d just like some ideas. Grandad also said that it was made near to where Stradivarius was, but I don’t know if that is true. thanks
  9. Hi guys. I’m looking at a violin that I’m interested. It is said to be a Thomas Perry, but on the photos it doesn’t have his traditional label in the on the button and underneath. and on the shop’s website it says ‘attributed to Perry’ could some of you experienced guys take a look at the photos and let me know what you think? https://kolstein.com/product/thomas-perry-violin/
  10. Hello all, I appreciate any and all knowledge shared regarding my violin, even if it is disappointing. I have owned an 1896 Eduard Reichert 4/4 Violin for about 30 years and have played it exclusively since I was a child. Recently I've become curious as to its origin and I'm having trouble finding solid info online. From what I've found so far it could be a mass produced "fake" from a factory in Germany from 1900-1920ish. I haven't found an example quite like it out there in internet land yet as it has some unique ornamental designs. The inlay on the back looks to be fairly common. The "caspar da salo" brand on the scroll looks more modern, but was also repaired at some point. Thanks!
  11. Hi All - I have a violin that was given to me by my Great Aunt, in 1980. I played it until 1995, and then unfortunately it was "lost". It has been found and now I'm interested in learning more about it. I'm wondering if anyone here has some ideas of it's origins. I know we can't always rely on tags, but the tag inside says "Reconstructed by B.F. Phillips & Sons. Cameo Bldg, 5th Floor. Pgh, PA. Aug 1936. E.S.P." B.F. (Benjamin Franklin) Phillips was from Warsaw, Poland. His father and grandfather (last name Filipiak) both were violin makers. BF came to the US around 1905 (name changed to Phillips) and set up shop in Pittsburgh. My research indicates he made approximately 150 violins and he was known for making them from woods recycled from old churches or buildings. BF passed away in 1977, in Pittsburgh. I believe the initials E.S.P. on the tag are that of BF's son Edwin Stanley Phillips. I have not found a lot of information on Edwin, but I did see that BF's other son, Eugene Walter Phillips played with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra for more than 40 years. I would assume that if this violin were originally constructed by B.F. then the tag would say "made by" rather than "reconstructed". However, I don't know what might be underneath the tag and I won't attempt to look. Assuming the violin was reconstructed by BF's son, I'm wondering about the origins of the violin. The only other information I have: I grew up in the Pittsburgh area. My Great Aunt was active in Pittsburgh orchestras, as was her husband. My aunt was from the Pittsburgh area. She married a man who had recently arrived from Greece. He and his adult siblings came to the US together and all were musicians. I don't know if the violin may have belonged to his family. The violin was given to me with a "Tourte" stamped bow. I KNOW it's not a genuine Torte. I'd love to learn more about it also and can upload pictures too. I have additional photos of the violin also or I can upload pictures of specific areas, if anyone has questions. Thanks so much!
  12. A friend of mine give me an ancient violin as a gift. She told me this is Joseph Guarnerius feit violin and it’s valuable. Who can help me to evaluate if this is real or copy version? How much is this worth for?
  13. Hi guys, Please post here your links for violin making videos, particularly old videos. Learning about violin making, it is great to see how it was done in the olden days. https://youtu.be/b9ZgneQmJ_M The Red Violin is a beautiful movie As a new hobby, it is quite fascinating. This is for amateurs/hobby. To become professional it is a lot better to go to college. With much appreciation, Rachel
  14. Hello I have a violin in my hands which says inside Jacobus Stainer in Absam prope Oenipontum 17. Any chance to be genuine and not copy? Thanks.
  15. Paulie

    Paul

    Anyone on ABRSM violin grade 6? I've chosen largo and allegro by William Gibson but I am a bit stuck on the best way to play bars 33 and 34 of the allegro, the part with the E pedal note, any ideas?
  16. Can anyone tell me if this is an authentic Bisiach violin? This was passed down to my grandmother who gave it to me to get appraised. If it is authentic, how much could this be worth?
  17. I've been meaning for months to take some additional photos of my violin and finally got around to it today. I bought this violin at a yard sale during the mid-1980s and it was in pretty bad shape then. In 2004, Justin Robertson in Albuquerque restored it as best he could, and it has been a nice, playable violin ever since. It has quite a nice, open sound, but does not have the overall volume or projection of the flatter profile instruments. Don Robertson has suggested that it is "Probably Austrian, mid-1800s", but it has no label to go on. I don't think the neck or the scroll are original to the body, since both appear to have a different varnish. Other than that, I'm not really sure. Thus, my bringing it here to get some additional ideas an opinions on the potential origin of this instrument. Thanks! Violin_scroll_front_smjpg
  18. So I was pasted down my grandmas violin from my dad and he doesn’t know much a bout the violin other then his mom gave it to him when he was little hoping he would learn violin. He never did. I have learned violin so he though he should give it to me. I started doing some research on the violin as it looks unique. I found some information online about the violins of hope. I read that these violins are from the Holocaust. I don’t know if someone in my family played it in the Holocaust or how someone in my family received the violin if it was from out of our family. My grandmas side of the family ( my dads side ) came to America from Germany. I know I have a lot of German in my ancestry as I do a lot of ancestry.com and I did 23 and me as well. Doesn’t anyone have any more information on the violins of hope, maybe how many are them are there ? What there value is ? The only marking inside the F hole is “ Germany “ no serial number or any other words. The violins case has a label “ George Barton music company quality Instruments Minneapolis Minn “ so I don’t know if there’s potentially a place the violin was boughten from after the Holocaust or if it’s just where the violin was bought from or if the case is even relevant to the violin or not I don’t know. But any information on the violin and history to it , value , answers . I would love some more information.
  19. I would very much like to share with the world a record that my parents (Lesley Heller and James Burnham) made many years ago. Like so many, I believe they never received the recognition they deserved as first rate violinists. The album includes the Sarasate Navarra, Moszkowski Op. 71 for two violins and piano featuring pianist Mary Louise Vetrano, and Spohr Op. 67 in a minor for two violins. The recording can be found on Spotify here. The album is also available on Amazon and iTunes for purchase, if anyone so desires to support. Thank you
  20. Collection of Violin Books for sale. Selling as a lot. I am closing up shop and need to sell. Here is the list: Meister Italienischer Geigenbaukeust Walter Hamma The Classic Lines of Italian Violinmaking Carlo Vettori Violin Restoration first printing #392 Weissar & Shipman Arte Liutaria - Analysis of Antique Instruments and Restoraation Techniques #286 signed Carlo Vettori The Book of the Violin 1987 Dominic Gill Il Liutaio 1978 La Casa Nuziale Arnoldo Baruzzi Violin Varnishes Hammerl The International School of Cremona Two Score Years of Violin-Making Gualtiero Nicolina The Violin Paolo Peterlongo The Hill Collection of Musical Instruments 1969 David D Boyden Violin Varnish and Coloration Martins Roberts Zemitis Il Manoscritto Littario Di G A Marchi first edition 1986 R Regazzi Known Violin Makers 4th ed 1983 John Fairfield You Can Make a Stradivarius Violin 1967 Reid Italian Violin Varnishes George Fry Bows and Bow Makers William C Retford The Bow, History, Manufacture and Use Henry Saint-George Arte Liutaria - April 88 No 10 Arte Liutaria - August 88 No 11 Old Violins and Violin Lore H R Haweis The Violin and Viola Shelia Nelson Violin Making as it was and is (1978) Ed Hero- Allen Fiddles: Their Selection, Preservation and Betterment 1910 Henry Saint-George Violin and Cello Building and Repairing 1969 Robert Alton Cremona Violins and Varnish Charles Reade A Review of Ancient and Modern Violin Making W W Oaks The Violin Maker’s Guide 1974 H E Brown The Technique of Violin Making H S Wake Useful Measurements for Violin Makers H S Wake Violin Bow Rehair and Repair H S Wake A Luthier’s Scrapbook H S Wake Violin Maker’s Notebook H S Wake Violin Identification and Price Guide Book 1 Roy Ehrdardt Violin Identification and Price Guide Book 2 Roy Ehrdardt Violin Identification and Price Guide Book 3 Roy Ehrdardt Final Summary Report of Violin Varnish Research Project Louis M Condax The Materials of the Artist Max Doerner The Artist Handbook Ralph Mayer Attached is photo.
  21. I have a Roman Teller violin. The year appears to be 1966 and the model is 40/4. I am trying to get some information on the instrument and a value. Thank you.
  22. Dear Everyone, I'm new to the forum, I started to look into buying a violin and I got a really (to my eyes) beautiful offer. I started recently studying and practicing violin and I would like to upgrade from my Chinese violin. I could also continue practicing with the current one, but I was thinking a "new" violin could improve my experience. Because I am really new to this instrument I would like to ask some more expert people what do you think about it. I'll post some picture here. The violin has a repaired crack under the tailpiece. Of course I already know that the label is fake (it says Joannes Baptista Guadagnini fecit Parma ferviens C S R 1741), the price is around 1500 USD, so it is just impossible is a Guadagnini. I just wanted to see if I should look into something else at this point price or just stick with the current violin till the restriction are over and I can visit a store. Thanks really a lot in advance for your help Stay safe and practice! Fabio
  23. Hello! Could someone tell me some information about this 2 violins? A Felix Stärke ( Hamburg, 1924) and a Jacobus Stainer ( with a lion head). I know that Felix Stärke was primarily a guitar maker based in Hamburg in the 1920’s-40’s. Known for his violin-inspired guitars, with proper f-holes and some models even with violin corners. The “Stainer” looks like a simple, but well made German trade violin, with some extra adornments. Early-mid 20th century? I’m trying to find some prices of these 2 violins. The thing of having a different shape or beeing decorated, makes me doubt... Thank you all. Naiara.
  24. 31 VSA journals from vol 9 to vol 20. 1986 to 2006. Plus indexes vol 1 - 10. Plus VSA papers vol. 1 number 1. ($250 plus shipping) Now $125 plus shipping
  25. Hi! I am new to this site. I’ve been trying to find out what the line on my viola top plate is called. You can see it in the picture attached under the left f hole. My teacher couldn’t recall what it is called, but he says that good instruments have unique things like this that reinforces certain frequencies and provides better resonance. I don’t know how true that is, but I’d still like to find out what this line is called.
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