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Found 1 result

  1. So I was hoping, with the help of experienced people, that I could make this topic into a checklist that you can have when trying to identify where your grandpa's Stradivarius, Grandma's Guadagnini, or that fiddle you found in the attic was made. I will list a few places, and if anyone want to share some of their time, please say what the traits would be for the violin. Most of what I used so far has been posted by Jacob Saunders in other threads. If I made a mistake with the categorizing, please note that the mistake is my fault. I will include all the quotes in Post # 2, as reference to who said what originally. If anyone have any other info to share on different places and those methods, please share. I will add everything to the original post. Markneukirchen/Schönbach: (Dutzendarbeit) Rib construction method: Built on the back. No mould (until later years) Corner blocks: Cosmetic or proper. The Dutzendarbeit method didn’t necessarily require corner blocks and therefore often didn’t have any, where they do, they mostly have, seen from the plan view a more equilateral triangle aspect. Ribs: The ends of the rib at the corners left long, so that you can get a cramp on to glue them together, and shortened afterwards, with the tendency to remain almost flush with the ends of the back outline at the corners. The Dutzendarbeit system involved making the ribs much longer first, so that they could be cramped and glued together and then rasped off afterwards. This leaves the joint either in the centre, or indistinguishable. The ends of their ribs were then often chamfered off at an angle, so that the rib ends don’t look so thick. The Dutzendarbeit ribs often end at the furthest protrusion of the back/belly corners. Scroll: Dutzendarbeit tend to me more rounded off and over in both respects. Fluting finishes as early as 6 o’clock. Back of the scroll tends to finish less sharp, or have a kind of “delta” at the bottom. Linings: Linings are not let in to these “corner blocks”. Back/Belly: The Dutzendarbeit bellies were roughed out with integral bass bar, until they developed a routing machine which made fitting and gluing a bass bar necessary. This was a remnant of the old Markneukirchen tradition and was neither quicker, easier or a short cut. Purfling: Dutzendarbeit often has stained blacks, where the stain hasn’t penetrated too the middle of the black strand, leaving a strange impression of grey/white/grey Mittenwald: Rib construction method: Inside mould. Corner blocks: The blocks glued to the mould, then cut to shape in the middle Ribs: Inside mould. This results in the Mittenwald ones having the join at the end of the ribs to the C bout side, the rib ends finishing cut fairly square. The bottom rib of a Mittenwald Verleger violin is with occasional exceptions in one piece (or was) and normally has a notch or notches (top and bottom) to mark the middle. Mittenwald rib corners stop a couple of mm before the end of the back/belly corners. Scroll: Viewed from the profile, Mwald Scrolls tend to have a pronounced “back of the head” (Hinterkopf) also a prominent “forehead” with sharpish champers. The fluting in Mittenwald goes all the way into the throat. On the back of the peg box, the Mwald centre spine normally remains sharp right to the end (and is often prominent vis a vis each side) Linings: Back/Bellies: The Mwald Backs/Bellies are, although smother, no more carefully worked out, often being either too thick or ridiculously thin. They have glued in Bass bars. Purfling: Mittenwald purfling is normally fitted far too deep, encouraging edges to break off. They tend to have “bee stings” which is less characteristic of the Dutzendarbeit. The black strand of the purfling in Mwald seems to be stained right through equally. Mirecourt: Rib construction method: Corner blocks: Scroll: Linings: Purfling: