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  1. I recently ordered a set of Karlsson scroll gouges. At the advice of a fellow Maestronet member, I took the Karlsson sweep table and laid it over a scroll template to see which ones would be the most useful for that particular template. I thought the following gouges fit the bill: 5-10mm 7-10mm 9-12mm 19-20mm I already submitted an order. But, after looking at my list, I realized that the two smallest gouges I ordered have the same radius, just a different length. Should I change the order before they start production and switch the 5-10mm for the 4-6mm instead? Would that make the set more useful? Also, if anyone else has been looking for it, here's the Karlsson set that @JacksonMaberry ordered a few years ago:
  2. This is one tool that really confuses me (along with bow saws). But I have a flat and a half round file I got at a used tools store. I think they’re junk and don’t work very well. Looking at the different files out there and there seem to be different labeling systems for coarseness and pattern and it’s a bit confusing to me. Will someone recommend a specific product you like? I’m looking for a single cut flat file and a cross cut file. Derber recommends 0-cut for both. While we’re on the topic, rasps. Get it or skip it?
  3. I ran across this video from www.violinsoundpost.com. The video is from 2013 but it looks like the website is still functioning and maybe taking orders. I'm curious what the pros think about this particular method and set of tools for fitting the soundpost? Is it just a waste of time and money or could it be useful for some of us?
  4. The 3D printer rules 38 / 42 / 50 / 60 I just made a very useful tool... In a moment, an 12-piece set.
  5. I know there have a been a few of these threads in the past but the latest one I could find is over a decade old. What are your top 3 tools or pieces of equipment that you absolutely couldn’t live without and why?
  6. https://www.amazon.com/Taytools-Thickness-Measuring-Resolution-Accuracy/dp/B084YR9N9V I found this dial thickness gauge on Amazon. It's supposedly made by Taylor Toolworks but I can't find the product on their website. It's about half the price of all the others I've seen, granted it has a maximum range of 22 mm. Has anyone used it or have any more information on it? It has a flat anvil tip. Is that a dealbreaker?
  7. Learn here how to remove rust https://thereviewhunt.com/restore-your-rusted-tools/
  8. Greetings, My name is Nestor I am from Greece and this is my first post on this forum. I am planning to build a violin and I am still gathering all the tools necessary to do so. I do have a workshop with a few tools but I am trying to keep the cost down as much as possible because its tools are kind of a rabbit hole. It gets really expensive. I wanted to ask your opinion regarding files. How many of them are (really, like impossible to work without them) needed, what types, how coarse etc? Thanks in advance and I am really glad to be part of this group Nestor
  9. We are located in Windsor On Canada - We still have an amazing collection of tone wood for violin, viola, and cello - both 2 piece, single pieces and jointed pieces spruce and maple - most pieces are from 1974 - 1980's accessories include bridges, fingerboards, etc wood blocks for scrolls molds ribs scrolls roughed out tone wood roughed out bows (brazil wood - various sizes) hanks of horse hair for bow rehairing tools 6-14 terrco marlin violin carver (backs, fronts and scrolls can be easily reproduced here) and so much more We are very limited in time as we no longer have the storage - please contact me for viewing can be purchased by large or small lots Inquire please!!!! I can post close up pics of any specific pieces
  10. I found this interesting article some time ago and saved it in my browser's bookmarks; I would like to ask some questions about Morel's knives since I know that there are some people on this forum who were trained in his shop or personally knew him and so I hope they'll be willing to share some knowledge on this. René Morel workshop artefacts - the Cozio carteggio First question is: it seems that Morel was always in search of the best tool steel blanks for his knives. What kind of steel did he use? The article says that the blade stock was made in the Mirecourt style and it had a roughly triangular cross section. All luthier's knives that I can find have a rectangular cross section, so why was this feature abandoned? Maybe it would rise production costs too much? The bridge-cutting knife has another interesting feature that I have never seen before. The blade tip seems to have been ground on the thick side and rounded. I wonder what is the reason to do that. When I learned bridge cutting from Alessandro Voltini at the Cremona school, he advised us to round the side of the blade a bit in order to ease the cutting action of the knife inside the bridge's kidneys and legs. But, we always kept a straight back and a slightly curved edge. So, I thought that the purpose of the grinding was that of reducing the thickness of the blade after it was sharpened, to reach into the thinner spaces of the violin bridge even with a thick knife stock blade. Since I have always trouble in sharpening very fine knife points with a stone, because the points bend a little under pressure, I wonder if the grinding was devised as a solution to this problem. Thank you all for reading and for your comments! --Giovanni
  11. Here is some stuff for sale. Juzek caliper- larger size for cello-SOLD holtier varnish. Dark is between 1/2 & 2/3 full. Clear is full. Old wood tube colors. Madder lake red is unused, madder lake brown red is very used, but there is plenty for multiple instruments left. I plan to include the brown red with the sale of the red.-SOLD Veritas convex sole squirrel tail plane. Dremel purfling jig-SOLD ibex purfling marker-SOLD old wood siccativ. SOLD Text me for fastest response. Make an offer on any or all of the items. 651-890-6683
  12. Happy 100th Birthday Posted: Wed Dec 27, 2017 2:30 pm Post subject: Happy Birthday, Harold Hayslett Celebrated his 100th birthday yesterday, Dec 26. He's a resident of Charleston, WVA. After retiring as a plumber/steamfitter in 1980 he began making violins, and became a well respected cello maker. In the 1990s he was awarded a Gold Medal for Cello tone from the ViolinSociety of America. This fall, he donated nearly his entire shop inventory of partially completed instruments, parts, plates, wood, tools, to the Southern Violin Association. A large part of the collection can be seen at https://onedrive.live.com/?authkey=%21AN1D02eul9dOJbY&v=photos&id=72ABB1F447C6888D%2112911&cid=72ABB1F447C6888D Some of the nicenst items will be offered for auction at the SVA annual meeting and conference April 19-21 in Little Switzerland, NC. The remainder will be auctioned on Ebay afterward. If you want to be added to our mailing list (Southern Violin Association), or if you'd like to see a particular item or group put on ebay, please email me at davidwchandler@outlook.com
  13. Whenever I see cheap violin making tool sets on websites like eBay, AliExpress, etc. (which I probably shouldn't be looking at at all, I know ) , very often this kind of tool is included: I haven't been able to find what the tool is for, can anyone enlighten me? Thanks
  14. Hello! I've a question for anyone who knows: How do you sharpen your scrapers effectively? I've not done too badly with a standard, straight-edged card scraper, but I've yet to find a good and reliable method for sharpening my curved scrapers and I know they're not cutting anywhere near as well as I would like them too. I'm just coming up to preparing my kit violin for varnish and I've love to know how to get a good edge on my scrapers before I begin the task I've found a lack of information in this regard when looking previously so maybe this can be useful to other amateurs as well
  15. Yes. I am grumpy I look after my tools and equipment. It's a source of pride. I don't mind lending stuff - IF I get it back in the same shape I lent it out in. Take my shop vac for example. After I use it I empty it. I dust it off. I have been known to wipe it down or wash it off if it needs it. Why would someone borrow it and return it filled with dirt and filthy on the outside too? What are they thinking? That I enjoy the privilege of cleaning up after them? That I have nothing better to do? They might not care about their stuff - which is fine. But this isn't theirs. Am the the only person who gets annoyed by this attitude? Am I too fussy? What do you do?
  16. I have a large pile of old wood , antique forms and violin making materials , violin and viola patterns from the estate of a violin maker from Crimea . i have attached photos of the contents of the boxes laid out on my studio floor. I know very little about these objects , except that they are quite old and quite beautiful. Can anyone enlighten me ? thank you .
  17. Heading to the cabin in the woods for the weekend? Off to a workshop? Family trip coming up and planning some "me" time? If you have a nifty way of transporting and keeping together your tools for the road trip, how about a photo and/or description? I know there is a fellow in our midst who has an amazing tool box he keeps with him as he travels across the country -- a vet who started making while on duty overseas. Someone else will remember his name. We've all schlepped in a suitcase at one time or another and for obvious reasons, that can be far from ideal. I imagine some here whose workshops are the envy of many have miniaturized. Just Because I Don't Remember My Own Name Does Not Mean I Am Having An Identity Crisis
  18. UPDATED March 14 It's been an awesome response to my post to sell off my barely used/never used luthier tools and materials. While I'll probably always wish I had actually pursued this work, at least I'm recouping some of the cost and the supplies and tools are finally getting used. Most items have been sold and delivered already. Here's what's left and up for sale still. I'm pricing everything at 50% of my cost or sometimes less. Pics supplied upon request. Jeweler's saw pick for plug removal bridge and fingerboard templates roll of waxed thread-bows 2 rolls of silk thread- bows. parallel jaw pliers- flatten knots alcohol lamp- small Violin Maker's Notebook- Henry Strobel I've also got many bows in need of repair/rehair that I got to use in my classes and practice on- I'll sell those off cheap- mostly shipping cost. So if you're looking to work on some bows I've probably got over 50 of them- mostly full size violin. Nothing looks like a "find" but many would make decent bows to resell after you've done your work on them.
  19. I took some classes in bow rehairing and repair as well as violin repair and construction but never continued with it. I've decided to sell off all of the materials and tools as they were costly to purchase and are not doing anyone any good just stored in a box(and I need to recoup at least some of the cost!). If you contact me I can provide you with a list of items for sale or if you are looking for anything in particular just ask. I also have 2 DVD;s, still in wrapping unused- When Trees Sing- Peter Paul Prior; Disc one and fifteen. I'm not sure if this is the best way to go about this or not but if you are planning to take some classes at UNH Violin Craftsmanship Institute,, etc. this will be a good deal for you. Clarification; I'll send you my original receipts so you can see what I bought and paid. Let me know if you are interested in the instrument repair/making items or the bow rehairing/repair ones as the lists are different. My bow classes were at UNH @ Lynn Hannings so if you are doing that, I've got what you need. The instrument classes were at UNH @ Horst Kloss plus at MCLA @ Hans Nebel if that helps any. I also have a set of unused plans for the "Titian" violin in a mailing tube.
  20. I know some of you like old tools...and maybe someone could use this to bend ribs... This is all my daughter's fault. If her truck hadn't broken down...and then enjoyed a prolonged stay...in a small northern farming hamlet...while being repaired... Then we wouldn't have driven her all the way back there to pick it up and we wouldn't have stopped at various highway antique shops on the way home. This is a Peter Wright anvil. I haven't figured out the date yet but it is an 83 pound model. I don't know if the grey paint was original or not. How would you clean it up? To keep it "original but for display? I was thinking soap and water...dry well...steel wool...dust off...and oil very lightly?
  21. Hi Everyone, I'm new to this group and I'm just moving into a wonderful sunny room to make instruments. However, I'm not sure how best to set up my space. What do you suggest? From past experience, or what you do in your own work space, what works best so I'd have easy & quick access to everything and my bench doesn't get too cluttered? I have a drafting table with no drawer space, a smaller free standing bench with small shelves and drawers on both sides, two large free standing shelves & milk crates, and wall space. For tools, I have chisels, gouges, three knives, planes, sharpening stones, files, drafting mateirals/strait edges, scrapers, saws, drills, and brushes. I also have some good instrument wood and some scrap wood. I deeply appreicate any and all input! Thank you!
  22. I wanted to thank Michael Richwine for his recommendation of the Zona saw. It arrived today and I'm sure it will be perfect for cutting the mortise for the neck. I was impressed with the quality too. I got a catalog from them (Micro Mark) and one of the things they sell is a 5" drum sander. Someone was looking for a method of thinning ribs a while back and this might work. A customer quote says they thinned some 1/16 stock to 1/32 with a tolerance of 0.003"! It's only got a 1/3hp motor so I really doubt it will do a full 5" width but it might work well for rib stock.
  23. I'm just starting out, and while I have enough tools to get through the ribs and plates, I know that when I get to it, I'm going to need more than my solitary #8/18mm gouge to do the scroll. What would be a recommended set of carving gouges to make this process not horribly difficult?
  24. For those of you out there that were wondering how to make your own Foret or Bow Drill, Rodney Mohr posted instructions on his facebook page. Instructions are accompanied by some pictures. Wish you all luck in making your own Foret! https://www.facebook.com/RodneyDMohr/posts/895746160456512
  25. Here's an interesting photo of a violin maker's shop, from Ebay: http://www.ebay.com/itm/C1905-Stereoview-SV-Country-Violin-Maker-Workshop-Mercer-Maine-by-W-H-Harris-/390855990659 It is comfortably cluttered, and will perhaps look familiar, one of the eternal verities of the luthier's profession. This man will be one of the two hundred or so violin makers who proliferated in Maine between about 1880 and 1910, and produced at times some very nice instruments. He may have a real bench, but it doesn't show here; the low bench to his right seems to me very much like one of the common shoemakers' benches of the period, and I wonder if this was not a workbench. Then again, he looks comfortable in his chair, and may have done a lot just sitting there. What I find especially interesting is the caliper in his right hand, which looks like a commercial product, not homemade. It's a stereo view, and the starting price is too much for me, though I have to say I would dearly love to have it.
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