tetler

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About tetler

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  1. tetler

    Violin ID #7

    Okay, I'll stay away from it for now. Out of interest, why is it much harder to work on an older violin? I pick up violins from local markets, second hand stores and such. This is one of those violins. My goal in general is to set them up and sell them. Money isn't the main motivation. I just enjoy the whole thing, but I'd prefer to stay on the plus side of course. I ask for ID because I don't want to risk messing up a fine violin, and because I just like to learn and to know what I have. Also, I don't want to overprice or underprice the instrument when/if I pass it on.
  2. tetler

    Violin ID #7

    Hmmm.. Just to let you know where I'm coming from: I have restored/repaired quite a few guitars before and also built a few acoustics from scratch. I have glued and cleated cracks in violins, installed soundposts, done basic setup including fitting pegs and things like that afew times. I feel confident that I can do the same on this one without ruining anything. What I don't want do myself (yet) is finish and retouching work. My original plan was to make it playable myself and sell it through a dealer on commission, as I have done with cheaper violins before. Now that I hear talk of profe
  3. tetler

    Violin ID #7

    Thanks for your input! Much appreciated I don't think I dare to touch it if the price tag is anywhere near the one Blank Face linked to. But that's perhaps a bit opitimistic. Life sure would have been nice if every violin had a label stating its true origin. I always found it strange that there are so many fine violins that were not labelled properly by the maker.
  4. tetler

    Violin ID #7

    Thanks, guys. So, is it reasonable to assume that this is made by Johann Christian Ficker, late 18th century? It looks old at least. There is a ton of wear along the fingerboard. A good 1,5mm of wood has been worn away from the top on the treble side along the fingerboard. The soundpost is out. Is this a fine violin? It has two cracks that are open, and I am reluctant to do repairs on something that has significant value, monetary or otherwise.
  5. tetler

    Violin ID #7

    Hi. What can you say about this violin? It is labelled "I C F", and has what I assume is a repair label from 1900. It has four corner blocks and a through neck with the ribs wedged in from the inside. The lower rib is in one piece, there is a notch in the middle of the back, and the saddle is "let in". Thanks!
  6. No, a truss rod (if adjustable) is meant to change the curvature of the neck, usually to make it less curved. This mechanism adjusts the angle of the neck against the body.
  7. Like you said, plywood is more dimensionally stable, so it doesn't crack when exposed to low RH. Also, cross grain stiffness is higher due to the perpendicular grain in the middle layer, which can make it a bit tougher and more impact resistant. And it is cheap of course. On the downside, laminates have noticeably higher acoustic damping (lower Q factor), meaning the plate doesn't ring as long when you tap it. This is usually not considered desirable in the guitar world at least, and especially not in the top. High damping tends to make the instrument less responsive, especially in the hi
  8. tetler

    Violin ID #6

    Interesting. I don't remember exactly what the label says, but it had a name and the city Christiania. I'll post a picture when I'm back home next week.
  9. tetler

    Violin ID #6

    Thanks, everybody! I never even thought about the pegs being interesting. To be honest, I'm a bit uncertain about the wood in both the neck and the back/sides. It doesn't quite look like regular maple to me, but I may be wrong. Any opinions?
  10. tetler

    Violin ID #6

    Hi. What could this be? It has a repair label from 1852. Four corner blocks, and the scroll fluting goes all the way in. Sorry about the bad photos from the inside. My inspection camera isn't top notch. Let me know if I should upload more photos. Thanks!
  11. tetler

    Violin ID #5

    I missed that. Thanks, Shelbow!
  12. tetler

    Violin ID #5

    It's 4/4 sized. So, does anybody want to help narrowing down the age and origin? So far I'm at Europe between 1500 and 2000. Anyone better? Here is a picture showing the scroll fluting, by the way. There is a shadow there making it appear that the fluting stops early. In reality it stops maybe a millimeter or so before the end of the throat.
  13. tetler

    Violin ID #5

    Brad, thanks for your input. Yes, the graft is real. Not sure what you mean by the bushings and indexing pins possibly being fake. They are real in the sense that they are made of separate pieces of wood - not painted or made out of any filler or the like. These "Schweitzers", were they made in a certain era or location? To me, this violin looks a bit older and nicer than the regular Markneukirchen stuff.
  14. tetler

    Violin ID #5

    Nope, no label. Why?
  15. tetler

    Violin ID #5

    Nothing gets past you people. Courtesy of the previous owner