deusAblutum

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About deusAblutum

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  1. Thanks. It plays really well and the tone is great! But I'll probably change the strings on it in a little a while. It is much brighter that I am used to.
  2. Thanks. I used mostly amber varnish with some artist's colors in the 2nd layer. I mixed a small amount of Eugene Holtier in one or two of the layers though.
  3. I wish I had a better camera, but here they are.
  4. Finally finished #2! I made this little guy for myself.
  5. Ah! I never even thought about reconditioned planes! I'll definitely do some googling on that.
  6. Checkout the video in my thread. I'm no expert by a long shot, but Rob Cosman, who has been doing woodworking for decades, mentions that a hand plane will naturally produce a convex surface.
  7. This is basically the method I've been using, except I've been using a block plane to remove the round: What I keep seeing is that the edge might be off square by a couple of degrees even when switching from side to side. Although Rob has been doing this for decades; so he makes it look super easy. I spent a day flattening this plane about a year ago. That it is this out of wack with how little I've used it has me concerned. I only spent 60 bucks on it and now I'm thinking maybe I should invest in a better one. I'm not a dullard and I get the importance of a proper setup. I just didn't think my plane would have turned into and upside down u after a few top joints.
  8. I appreciate what you are saying, however, I don't have access to anyone with wood working experience or the money for a lot of expensive tools. This isn't a profession for me and I am pursing this as hobby in my spare time. All I have learned about building violins is from the internet, forums, blogs and a few books because that is what I have access to. That being said for someone who has never touched a tool before who has gone on to build an instrument I think I've done pretty good so far. It may take me longer and I'm okay with that. I've never done this before. When I feel out of my depth or I get stuck, I consult these forums because that Is the resource I have. Forums like this are a wellspring of knowledge and I am grateful to all the people who contribute because I would't know half the things I know about building violins without them. Is there any reason you prefer a wooden plane? Let me know how it goes. I've been thinking about this method myself. What is your reasoning fro using a low angle plane instead?
  9. Oh... Well, my plane is so out of flat that I can see a gap of about 1mm between the sole and a straight edge...
  10. My blades are always sharp enough to shave with. I don't have any issues with the glue itself. It's just getting a square wedge where I have issues. It seems to me the consensus is to use a shooting board. Unfortunately, I live in a small apartment and don't have room for power tools to make a shooting board and I don't really trust a hardware store to get the cuts straight enough to be accurate for a shooting board. Are there any suggestions as to where I can buy one?
  11. I don't use a shooting board and I've often considered a tabletop jointer to rid myself of the stress and ~3hrs it takes to get a seam. My method that I've been using is this: I use a Stanley #5 to get the edges of the boards square after that I use a block plane to make the edges flat. With one wedge in the vice, I match the other up to to find the high spots and then with a block plane, finely tuned to take scraper-like shavings off, I level both edges. I do a rub joint and I've heated the wood in the past but don't find it makes a difference for me. The most stressful part of this whole process is trying to get the wedges initially square without taking off too much material. Too often the wedge is ever so slightly out of square or the surface becomes twisted as I plane it so I end up taking more and more material off to get it square. After I have squared the wedges, I can get them flat pretty quickly and easily.
  12. I'm just wondering if there is any easier way to go about it. I've been making my center seams the traditional way with hand planes and instead of getting easier over time it just seems to get more stressful. My last one nearly gave me an aneurysm.
  13. Thanks, good advice. I like how Roger Hargrave mentioned that he takes time to leave the instrument and come back later to give his eyes some time to rest between stages of antiquing. BTW Joe, would you recommend Tried and True for finishing the back of the neck?
  14. I don't plan on making it look ancient, just old. So I don't think there will be massive spots with no varnish left.