dpappas

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  1. It's also a reflection of the iconic music that was written, recorded, and played with that instrument. More people have listened to Pink Floyd than can be counted. There is a strat (not strad) owned by a record producer and guitarist of Le Chic, that is called "hitmaker" because it has been on so many albums that it's tied to over a billion dollars in record sales. I suspect "hitmaker" will also fetch a pretty penny.
  2. I usually buy local, to support my local shop, but when Shar has a 20-30% string sale, I have to admit I sometimes order from them (especially cello strings, which my shop carries in limited supply).
  3. Kreisler’s main violin was the 1730 ex-Kreisler, which he “donated” to the Library of Congress after owing a lot of taxes. https://tarisio.com/cozio-archive/property/?ID=40400
  4. Agreed, I have the FineTune pegs and I use the peg box only and no fine tuners in the tailpiece. It freaks people out at first.
  5. There is precedence with this, with the Gibson 1717 strad. Violin stolen, insurance paid out. Unwitting wife of the thief comes forward with the strad decades later. Insurance company owns it outright and has someone auction it to Norbert Brianin. If you can prove the instrument was yours, then it is now the insurance company’s, and they won’t give it to you. They’ll charge you it’s current market value, and the shop will be the loser. They could have acquired it several owners down the line and thought they had made a legitimate buy.
  6. Her pieces on sound and vibrato are excellent, and I really enjoyed her equipment one as well.
  7. He also made recipes for rosin, which are still sold by D'Addario under the Kaplan Artcraft brand. I use both the light and dark versions.
  8. That’s what I figured when I started this thread, but I wanted confirmation.
  9. Don’t upgrade. You are fairly new. Focus on getting better. Case in point, I sounded awful yesterday and spent today wondering if I need to upgrade. Instead I did some basic exercises in tone production and my tone was back, and then some.
  10. I wouldn't disagree. Before the internet, how many violinists even ask these questions. I'm taking measurements of my violin for sheer curiosity, but when doing so, one wonders what the range or standards happen to be. My violin, over the arch, is 352 mm. I'll probably rig up calipers tonight and see as well. Interestingly, the stop length and string length are normal. I've had to use a custom tailpiece to get near the 1/6 starting point for string length.
  11. That’s what I figured. It seems that any dimensions that one does not measure directly are useless.
  12. Hello, I was taking some measurements of my violin, out of sheer curiosity. But when measuring the back length, one can measure with calipers or over the arch. When comparing my violin, the back over the arch is 352 mm, a little on the small side. It's a little smaller than my old instrument, just based on how it fits in the case. I didn't know if the data I saw on other instruments (e.g. Tarisio) was over the back or with calipers. The instrument length may or may not affect tone, I don't really know or care. My instrument sounds the way it does because of all of the mix of various factors. I'm really just curious how the back is usually measured and reported. There was a thread on MN a while back on back measurements, but I couldn't glean if reported values adhere to a standard method of measurement (being the violin, I bet they don't). Thanks dimitri
  13. Are you looking to buy? It’s been a while since I’ve come across one of your threads where you think you’re buying a Stradivarius or something similar.
  14. Here’s mine: Workshop strad copy. I played every violin in and out of my price range and this one kept jumping out at me. I don’t feel the need to get a different violin, it’s the one.