Danube Fiddler

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  1. Danube Fiddler

    The ground ( sealing) of the great masters - which was it ?

    I also had some sucess in preventing from deep penetrating - however my procedure was cumbersome and didn´t suceed in all cases.
  2. Danube Fiddler

    The ground ( sealing) of the great masters - which was it ?

    At the moment I believe in a filling of pores by dried oil or oil-varnish ( if Echard or Brandmair really would have retreated their findings/conclusions - we should know this ). The main question for me is : what did the old masters do to limit the deeper penetration of the oil or oilvarnish ? Was it a procedure like this of sospiri ? If we believe sospiri, a violin can be sealed after 2 weeks by 5 until 7 applications of very few linseed oil by finger and eventually sun-drying. Was it a pretreatement by proteins, which limited penetration ? Did they have another (forgotten) way to limit penetration ?
  3. Danube Fiddler

    The ground ( sealing) of the great masters - which was it ?

    This is common knowledge. Is not needed to tell. What is needed to tell : 1) on wikipedia you can read, that the process of oil-drying in not completely understood by science 2) if we consider 1) there is much room for a lot of things...... 3) dried oils ( particularly I read of poppyseed-oil ) can re- soften ( can be read in Doerner ) 4) even not drying oils like olive-oil can dry in certain circumstances 5) what is needed for oil- drying is ( besides energy from UV or heat) mainly oxygen. 6) The access to oxygen can become very limited in a deeper part of an oil-layer particularly by a dried skin on the surface of the oil-layer Therefore thickness of layers plays an essential role. 7 ) the conclusions of 1) - 6) could i.m.o. be, that the thing of drying oils is very complicated and one should be open to a lot of unexpected things
  4. Danube Fiddler

    Extracting a yellow pigment from aloe

    I hope that nobody here will like to poisen himself and his clients, while I think, that the danger for the maker is much higher.
  5. Danube Fiddler

    The ground ( sealing) of the great masters - which was it ?

    I think, the point of sospiri is an important point : thick layers of oil probably have differing longtime-drying properties even, if the oil is pretreated and cooked and even driers are added. There seems to go on something in the deeper parts of a thick layer, which could even be an opposite of a drying-process. If an applied layer has a thinner than a certain critical thickness, the drying-process could be completely different and very fast, even if used is only raw linseed oil. The result could be, 1) that in the pores of wood there will not remain any oil, which could penetrate deeper and 2) the final hardness of this dried oil will be higher in comparison to "normal" dried oil and will also have less damping If there ever will be a point of no longer changings in dried oil layers ? May be it is an advantage of oil-grounds and varnishes, that this point will never come.
  6. Danube Fiddler

    Top plate dilemma

    What´s about to play in the white but grounded ? This sound should be nearer the final (varnished) sound.
  7. Danube Fiddler

    Top plate dilemma

    It seems nearly to be a brand of Stradivari/Guarneri-del-Gesú - top graduations ( a little bit also in the backs - particularly in Strad-backs ) to remain strong particularly in these CC-edges. However I agree with all of your other points.
  8. Danube Fiddler

    The ground ( sealing) of the great masters - which was it ?

    Hi sospiri, thanks for explanations - this seems to be a fine applying system ! Do you also need sun/UV on each layer ?
  9. Danube Fiddler

    The ground ( sealing) of the great masters - which was it ?

    I believe to also have read this post here, but forgot, who had written : It seemed to be an info more like " I have heard, that someone other has drunk a beer with Echard and after the 5th beer Echard told........"
  10. Danube Fiddler

    Stradivari's secret was a concept?

    I don´t know, if there is any typical "opera-accompaniment- frequency-distribution". This could much depend on the music-style ( baroque/classic/romantic/contemporary) as also the composers personal style. In earlier posts I thought of other limitations to the singers formant, because it is originally a thing of male voices not the female voices. This could be right to some extent, but I think, that more important are other things : - the accompaniment players have to play very quiet and additional I believe, they alterate their own sound-colour that way, that they can hear the soloist best resulting in a complete sound, in which the listeners also can hear the soloist best ---> I assume, that this capability of the orchestral players is a very big part of the whole thing. - the solo-instrument has to have a certain power ( naturally !) but even more important could be some things of a very own sound-signature, easily to identify by listeners and therefore easily to separate from the orchestral sound. Which nature this special signature has, eventually is nearly not yet explored. In easy words, a soloistic instruments should not only have a big sound but also a very personal/individual general sound-colour - differing much as possible from "normal" violinsound while naturally beeing very beautiful in spite of this. Therefore one eventually should distinguish projection in a simple understanding from the ability to identify a single instrument in a sound- mixture of many instruments.
  11. Danube Fiddler

    Extracting a yellow pigment from aloe

    Generally I think, colours for violin-varnish don´t have to be extremely lighfast. The needs for paintings are much higher. What is needed in violinvarnish i.m.o. is, that any beautiful colour will finally remain - it doesn´t have to be the original colour.
  12. Danube Fiddler

    Stradivari's secret was a concept?

    This is a very interesting combination of modal-analysis- results and Dünnwald-findings as also the story of nearfield-quietness of old-italian violins ! Your thoughts are very convincing i.m.o. Additional I assume, that the emphasis on the singer-formant frequencies ( also found by Dünnwald) can compensate for the 1kHz - weakness of old-italian-instruments in a certain amount. One more thought about 1khz - frequencies : they are very good projecting and this could be the reason, why modern violins often can beat or at least withstand old-italian violins in projection-power in simple projection - tests. Particularly when listener concentrate just only on, how much sound comes to them (probably mostly ). However the thing could become better for the old-italian-violins, when listeners would concentrate on, how much "information" comes to them. This is, because the frequency-ranges above 1 kHz i.m.o. contain more information ( sound-colour/ expressiveness/ secondary noises ... ), which on the longer term make a performance much more interesting. So a new conspicion could be, that some (modern) not-old-italian instruments ( also beeing loud in the nearfield) in fact project better in power but mostly would loose in projection of information.
  13. Danube Fiddler

    Stradivari's secret was a concept?

    Sorry, this was not my intention. Apparently you meant : the soundimpression under the players ears or in the nearfield actually is important - however this sound in your experience is mostly prefered beeing loud.
  14. Danube Fiddler

    Stradivari's secret was a concept?

    I am not sure about this. In most cases ( in your or other violinshops) a violin will first get explored only in the nearfield. If it fails there, it will not reach a concert-hall for further tests.
  15. Danube Fiddler

    Stradivari's secret was a concept?

    Musicians judge violin-sound very personally and differing. There are such orchestral players, you just told of. And indeed I sometimes heard of such "disappointments" as told by nathan slobodkin, refering some players in contact with great old-italian instruments. I think, not all players love this effect. However it seems, that exactly this is really one of the leading properties of the old-italian-sound. In my own experience a considerable part of all middle-class-old-italians ( 200k+ ) show this phenomenon. Eventually the proportion of this property again decreases in the group of extremely soloistic top-level old-italian violins, may be. Sadly the access to such instruments is very limited and I never could play a Strad/Guarneri del-Gesú in current use of a leading world-class-soloist.