Danube Fiddler

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  1. Danube Fiddler

    Michael Köberling`s bench

    Thanks for more pics. They show great work, particularly ground and varnish. If I would be forced to critizise anything, it would be the corner-inside, where some years are dented a little bit and a little bit too rounded edgework. Naturally this can also be a thing of use and artificial aging/ antiquing. However this is only one little detail in a very fine instrument. I still don´t understand the judges decisions. I think, one should forget this competition : too few judges / no convincing consistency of judgements / therefore it is to assume, that soundtest-designs are even worse .......
  2. Danube Fiddler

    Michael Köberling`s bench

    I can´t understand this judgement. Do you have some high-res-pics for some closer views of this instrument ? From your pics yet shown here I see a wonderful looking instrument with great ground/ varnish and a very highl level of antiquing. I think, muscicians will appreciate the optical appearance very much. Could be the reason, that in VSA only a very little bit antiquing is allowed ?
  3. Danube Fiddler

    Michael Köberling`s bench

    I can´t read and understand this attachment. May be it is not only a lotterygame to ship but also to participate such a competition-soundtest at all. My suspicion is, that the designs mostly are bad for financial reasons ( to take Fritz, Saitis et al and requested halls/players would cause high costs ). So we don´t know, if the actually used rooms ( may be not concert-halls at all ) and (poor) test- designs can evaluate, what musicians under real life-conditions are looking for.
  4. Danube Fiddler

    Don Noon's bench

    May be the tonal evaluations have been quite different. Can you report, how the procedures have been ? - player evaluations and/or listener evaluations ? / how many players did play each instrument ? - room acoustics ( tests in different halls ? ) My suspicion is, that in violinmaking - competitions the soundtest-designs often could be somewhat poor because of costs for several testing professional players and hall rentals. May be at VSA they didn´t have a good "viola-hall" for testing - there are some halls, in which certain stringed instrument-types just don´t sound so fine than in other halls or than normally. Then it is very hard to have success in such a hall. Anyways - congrats to your success !
  5. Danube Fiddler

    Michael Köberling`s bench

    You are sure to have built this violin ? If really - my great respect !
  6. Danube Fiddler

    Plate Thickness/Overall Weight

    Sadly I can´t. I don´t have pics of these instruments and - I need a 3D - view on a violin to see the beautiness of archings. It is the interplay of longitudinal and cross-arching. In 2D-pics I wouldn´t see it and you probably also would not recognize, what I love - sorry.
  7. Danube Fiddler

    Is this violin really worth $5000?

    I believe, 5k is a somewhat difficult price-area. I.m.o. the value of this violin will much depend on three questions : 1) is it a mastergrade violin of an individual professional maker with some probability ? 2) what´s about condition ? 3) does it sound fine ? From pictures I have some little doubts in 1) - but needed is the judgement of a professional maker in your area ( also regarding condition ) For 3) it is very important, that you like the sound. However it seems, that your experience is limited - so needed would be some sound-related evaluations by professional players. If all 3 points could be answered positively, the aquisition and price should be o.k.
  8. Danube Fiddler

    Plate Thickness/Overall Weight

    I don´t believe, that the magic of this record is the hall - but surely a nice hall always can help a lot and will be a great source of pleasure while playing. For sound-tests, I think, one should have several rooms. I find it difficult to say, there is any special type of suitable testroom with general meaning. But surely there are rooms, which are absolute not suitable. Arching is my blind spot until now. I absolutely don´t understand archings and can separate only by beautiness. Some of the most beautiful archings, I ever have seen, were in Landolfi and Montagnana violins. Many archings by old makers of german school I don´t like, while Stainer - archings sometimes are not that extremely "german" and I like them much more.
  9. Danube Fiddler

    Which maker do you prefer and why

    I described it earlier : fame of the maker = historical evaluated sound-quality The actual perceived sound-quality has to approximately fit the fame of maker or in other words has to fit the historical evaluated sound-quality of the maker. Equation : actual sound-quality = ~ historical sound-quality x personal taste x measurement errors If this equation is not fulfilled the violin will have a lower or higher price with considerable property.
  10. Danube Fiddler

    Plate Thickness/Overall Weight

    B.t.w. : the sound of this Stainer in my taste is great ! When I hear this music, it seems that a whole past world comes back.
  11. Danube Fiddler

    Plate Thickness/Overall Weight

    Hi Emilg, thanks for this really interesting link ! Mr. Höpfner ( Director of strings-collection of Austrian art-historic museum ) also has published an interesting book about the collection of oenb including measurements of a Stainer and a quite big number of more extremely fine instruments. Sadly partially the automatic speachrecognition and sub-translation is somewhat poor . Interesting is, that Stainer according to the dendro used for its top ( not "particles" as in subtitle) a very old wood ( youngest annual ring [not "drink" ] = 1615 ! the oldest 1466 !! the violin dated 1670 ). This is in contrast to e.g. Guarneri-del-Gesú, who partially had used very fresh wood ( < 5 years ).
  12. Danube Fiddler

    Plate Thickness/Overall Weight

    This is a good attitude, I like it. I yet have some Stainer grads, also including the violin of the Austrian National Bank collection. These grads have more moderate ( eventually reworked) central top thicknesses ( < 3,5mm ) but quite thin edges, particularly in the back and also the back middle bouts. I don´t consider Stainer as a not-italian maker but the leading maker of the German school in its best sense. Apparently his violins a long time were valuated equal or even superior to the best italian instruments. So Stainer didn´t need an "italian fame". In opposite I read, that a considerable proportion of italian makers have been highly influenced by Stainer or the German school.
  13. Danube Fiddler

    Plate Thickness/Overall Weight

    Does this Stainer-study have public access ? This (german) grad-system seems to had been used also by some very fine old-italian makers. It doesn´t seem to be a crime to use such wood may be one has to commit crimes to get such wood A tonewood - dealer once said, to use light wood would be the first (easy) way to make fine instruments. To make fine instruments with more normal wood, one needs more knowledge. Sadly he didn´t explain more details.
  14. Danube Fiddler

    Plate Thickness/Overall Weight

    Wow, this is a quite uncommon graduation. Without knowing your grad-system, but only regarding your very few data, I assume, that you used extreme low-density wood in both, top ( ~ <= 0.38) and back ( ~ 0.55 ), isn´t it ? The "color"-idea seems interesting. However my reading would be, that you didn´t use "more wood" - one can see it in your (low) weight - you even used ~ 15% lesser wood than Rimino.
  15. Danube Fiddler

    Which maker do you prefer and why

    They exactly will do so - because they have no other chance. There will not be any sale of another instrument of the same maker, which will have 1) same making period, model and condition AND 2) being sold within a short time-span IN 3) comparable market-situations AND 4) all that reported in a publicly documented verifiable way Resulting are mainly these procedures : 1) The seller/dealer tries to derive a price - idea from very few sales of quite minor comparability. Because of that the resulting price-idea is charged with high uncertainty ( easily 20 % or even much more ) 2) the dealer/seller is checking the actual markets beginning with a quite high price-ask approximately according his badly derived price-idea. Eventually he will succeed in some time or he has to lower his price-ask. A dominant role will play the question, how fast the instrument must be sold. 2) the seller and the buyer negotiate the price according the very few and badly comparable sales, they know. Mostly the seller/dealer will have much better informations. If a dealer is between the seller and the buyer - often only the dealer knows the names of participants and the selling price / buying price / dealers commission. All that again is supporting an area of lacking and / or not comparable informations about financial values of instruments - the sound question still not included.