heavymetalalfa

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  1. heavymetalalfa

    Please help me put a makers name, to a good fiddle, for a good man.

    Again, televet, not sure why you feel the need to downplay the art of the makers of that period and place, but your statement that there was no John Juzek is simply not true. Today I spoke with a friend who is a renowned modern maker,, and he told me of knowing John Juzeks son, and filled me in on the Juzek shop from 20's Master Art days, till after the war and the move, to him coming to the US and starting Metropolitan Music, which is still run by a Juzek. Why the need to name all nice German violins of the 1880's till the 1930's "common' or "made by the dozen"? I think you and those who do, do a disservice to fine violins.
  2. I am offering a couple of 1 piece backs, air dried for at least 10 years. Northern red maple. All measure at least 16 X 8 1/2 X 1 inch. I will take $160 each, shipping included.
  3. heavymetalalfa

    Please help me put a makers name, to a good fiddle, for a good man.

    Wow, not really sure why the need to put down any creative thought offered. So, we should just consign all these Morellis, Master Art Juzeks and the like to have been made by faceless peons, by the dozen.
  4. heavymetalalfa

    Please help me put a makers name, to a good fiddle, for a good man.

    I agree dear Lady Violadamore. And thank you for the links. I first saw a better Morelli in the 1980s, it was the quality of a Juzek Master Art. I sold it for near the same value as a high end Heberlien Jr or Roth Master Art which was $1200-1500 back then.. I saw some later on that were nice, but not as juicy, varnish and model wise. It's obvious to me that Karl ran a good shop and bought from other high end makers to spec for his wholesale trade.
  5. heavymetalalfa

    Please help me put a makers name, to a good fiddle, for a good man.

    Ya, I loved those catalogs. One had a green cover, one a brown cover, don't remember the third. I'm definitely leaning towards Morelli by Hermann. It was a beautiful violin.
  6. heavymetalalfa

    Please help me put a makers name, to a good fiddle, for a good man.

    Sorry, I forgot to mention the label. It is labeled "Matteo Goffriller". No brand. I can see it being a Morelli, though the pics above of the Juzek and the Morelli are pretty much identical. Seems to me Juzek Master Art were always branded?
  7. Today, I traveled to northern New Hampshire in search of violin wood. I had talked to a man in the hills, with a great, unspoiled wood lot, and an Old School small saw mill. I enjoyed meeting him and his son, they had great wood, and I got some nice 10 year old, violin/viola sized, slab cut 1 piece back wood. While we talked, he mentioned a cool old guy in the next valley over, that was a serious square dance fiddler, and repaired fiddles for local folk. I had time, so I drove over, dirt road most of the way, and met him. Wonderful character, yard full of 20's and 30's Fords. He invited me in, he had several violin repair projects going, and as we talked, he saw I knew a bit about violins, so he asked me to look at a violin for him. I enjoyed it at first sight. From seeing his work, he will restore it properly, and he will play it a lot. So, to make a long story slightly shorter, who might the maker be? These are the only pics I could get, he held it for me to use my phone, while the mosquitoes and black flies attacked us mercilessly. Very nice scroll graft and bushings, maybe from new. Sweet scroll. Nice varnish and only lightly antiqued. Sorry about the last pic of that beautiful scroll, a black fly flew into my eye right as I took it. Damn near gave myself a black eye swatting it. My MN friends, what think you?
  8. heavymetalalfa

    Opinion of origin desired.

    This is true. Do you think there can be identifying characteristics of, say, the Chicago School, New York School, Cincinnati School? Might Boston figure in? An interesting question I think. It appears to me, these cities became centers of violin making in America, largely because of big venues that hosted concerts by travelling world violinists, and large populations exposed to great music wanting instruments. And as I had mentioned, they seemed to come of age as violin making centers in the late 1800's. Interesting thought, the Mn response on the origin seems to be; European members say Markneukirchen, American members mostly say American. Thoughts on that?
  9. heavymetalalfa

    Opinion of origin desired.

    By coincidence, I visited a fiddler/historian today to look at some fiddles to buy. There were 4 German and 3 American. All 3 American were distinctly different from each other. He also had a pair by a Maine maker that were very similar to each other, nice, but not for sale I would like to offer my guess on ratio, I say 1 in 300-500. I have seen so many in my years that I think that's closer. I have 5 myself right now, and will buy the 3 I just saw. As to an "American School" style of making, that would be hard to define. Most early (pre 1880) US makers didn't know many, if any, other makers, and only had German/French imports to look at and store bought violin plans, or even just illustrations to work from. It appears the best American makers came in the late 1800's, when they had opportunities to see and study some of the great instruments finally. I think 1 in 10 fiddles from here are good to great, 2 in 10 decent if quirky, the rest are Folk art, cool looking in a rustic way but barely playable if at all.
  10. heavymetalalfa

    Opinion of origin desired.

    Let me ask this, the wood says American to me. Now, I am just a lowly violin hunter and repairman, not a worldly professional, but I have bought and sold many hundreds of violins. I have Very rarely seen wood like this in an undeniably German violin. The mineral streaks- they are not beetle tracks-, are very common to N. E. American wood, and I have never seen Euro wood offered with such a characteristic. I Do know something of wood, as I cut violin making wood as part of my income.
  11. heavymetalalfa

    Opinion of origin desired.

    I respectfully disagree, Sir GeorgeH. I believe it is American, possibly Maine made, with the hand of an Italian immigrant on it. That last might be being a bit fanciful, but the wood speaks of the Northeast of our great country.
  12. heavymetalalfa

    Opinion of origin desired.

    I agree. I have seen, as many of us have, a great many American, hobbyist/luthier made violins, of character, with obviously commercial German scrolls. Sometimes quite fanciful bodies, with rather pedestrian catalog scrolls. And many American 'labeled' fiddles that were bought in the white, and subjected to a plethora of varnish "formulas". I have one such, a beautiful burnt orange varnish, that aged to a serious cracklaquer, looks like it slid a bit, before finally drying. Or maybe many seasons in a violin case in a hot attic,,. Anyway, I digress. Yes, I see German influence in both of these, but in the case of the OP violin, I see more love and style than a "usual" dutzendarbeit violin.
  13. heavymetalalfa

    Opinion of origin desired.

    Kevin, here is the violin from the thread you reference, alongside the one we discuss here. From the info on that thread, I think that one may be a violin Squire had made with wood sent to Markneukirchen.
  14. heavymetalalfa

    Opinion of origin desired.

    The back measures 358. No indication of having had a label, no signatures or marks inside. I too am always surprised when I see nice American fiddles with no label or signature.
  15. heavymetalalfa

    Opinion of origin desired.

    Hello folks, I would like peoples opinion of origin for this nice fiddle. It has a wonderful tone to my ear, strong low end, clear highs. Thoughts?