Byrdbop

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About Byrdbop

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  1. Of course. I paid very little for it. Just very surprised by how good it sounds.
  2. I made the presumption that it was a reference to violinist and later owner the Sears company Max Adler.
  3. I acknowledged that with an afermative indeed.
  4. Here's the aforementioned bow. Is the stamp a form of homage or just a bit of nonsense?
  5. Indeed but when it sounds as fine as this all such considerations fly out of the window.
  6. Cheap. With my limited identification skills I'm guessing Saxony Stainer(ish)? Unfortunately the original varnish has been stripped. Highish arching. One worm hole in the back. Heavenly overtones abound and it's just a joy to play. A keeper despite itself. Bow that came with it is decent and stamped 'Max Adler'. I know he played the violin but certainly never made bows.
  7. I know it's nothing special but would anyone care to guess it's origin and approximate age?
  8. https://www.bromptons.co/auction/2nd-16th-september-2019/lots/14-a-german-nickel-mounted-violin-bow.html Why does this bow command such a high estimate? Incorrect listing?
  9. It's in a glass case and is never played so is it even a violin?
  10. They work very nicely indeed as the pegs and the fitting of probably cost more than I paid for the violin/csse/bow they are very much an added bonus. The points made about other plastics used are fair but it does seem out of keeping to have plastic pegs on a turn of the century instrument. I'll get over it.
  11. Correct! Rather good but I'm not convinced plastic should be a component of any violin.
  12. Inlaid not painted but correct it's nothing special.