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Guido

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Everything posted by Guido

  1. ... and long to eat their instrument if it only was vegan.
  2. Most of the production at Markneukirchen has transitioned from BOB to outside mould at some time. There have been long threads about this and the likely timing. My take-away was (and it could be wrong) that the majority or almost all violins were outside mould after about world war 1, some probably earlier.
  3. One of my favourites. Blanchi, right?
  4. Same buyer at T2 also bought this one. Someone really likes chin ups. https://t2-auctions.com/auctions/lot/?csid=2199552000&cpid=3755671552
  5. Clean and genuine beyond doubt at T2 is such a "find" that it may well sell above retail. Even if the sound may make it difficult to sell in a shop.
  6. I've had +40C just then. Better still, this time of year a few years back, I travelled from +40C in Perth Australia to -40C in Alberta Canada. There are no words to describe the shock to the body; don't need to be made of wood to get into trouble.
  7. Guido

    Odd one ID

    Could be. I reckon even the edges are on the big ropey side. Only think is that it appears a little old for that, but I might be wrong.
  8. Guido

    Odd one ID

    Good idea! The back wood could certainly point that way. Else, however, I don't see too much similarity with some quick search results for older violins from Japan. Can anything be said how they usually measure up? My 354 mm is certainly not a common production size these days anymore.
  9. Guido

    Odd one ID

    Came across this article looking for some poplar impressions. I reckon my back totally looks like the ribs on this cello! https://stringsmagazine.com/the-forest-the-trees/
  10. Guido

    Odd one ID

    BTW, the pictured don't do the flame on the back justice. It is super active and looks like it's moving around in three dimensions.
  11. Guido

    Odd one ID

    This one is a little odd and I wonder if anyone might have some clues for me regarding ID. Some observations. - LOB 354 - scroll fluted to the bitter end (which it appears was indeed rather bitter) - most likely built on an outside mould (with linings running continuously over the blocks) - Heavy in the wood, but tonally surprisingly successful - Generously spaced 4 cleats on the back and the top centre seams - Economic approach to the inside work with both bass bar and linings left square, neither bevelled nor rounded. - Back, ribs and neck of odd wood (is this poplar?) - Made with urgency and spontaneity ;-) and begging for a fake Italian label, but unlabelled. Any ideas appreciated.
  12. +1; but: it might be worth $200 with new stings and a bridge - which makes it a zero sum game pretty much. I think you will maximise your return by avoiding to spend anything at all on it and simply putting it on ebay with a $1 starting bid.
  13. Guido

    Bazin school?

    Thanks BF. That's a deep throat on the Laberte, too. Just my eye didn't seem to see it coming while yours did :-) My bow as paired (found) with a French fiddle, which could well be Laberte; and which could well be an original pairing. But yes, tricky to keep them apart. I thought my double cut on the adjuster (which seems characteristic), might look more like (Louis) Bazin style. And they did deep throats, too.
  14. Guido

    Bazin school?

    ...sorry for the dark and blurry pictures; but maybe it is clear enough on what can be seen. Just wondering if this is a (simple, nickel mounted) French bow and possibly something like Bazin school? I note the Frog with the deep throat, a tapered adjuster with a double cut, the pearl slide with a taper. Not visible: the underslide is pinned; the bow is round with the octagonal facets phasing out just after the winding, the screw mortice in the bow is wider than the lower facet.
  15. That doesn't make sense, else no bow would ever get splined, as it would be worth exactly the same before and after the repair. And who does splines for free? If the repair is well done, a good splined bow can be a very attractive proposition for a player. Just how attractive? Maybe the seller should consider a price increase :-) As an aside, I had an accident with my favourite bow 35 years ago, had it splined and played it ever since as if nothing had ever happened. Still my favourite bow today.
  16. Seems to be well in line with other auction results at T2 these days
  17. A stripped and revarnished Markie. The head doesn't belong or is heavily modified. To make it look more interesting, someone has replaced the ribs, back and top. The usual. But I'd have to see the modified/ replaced blocks and linings to say more.
  18. No it isn't. It's Wien, the city's name in its native language. I would also seriously doubt, as Jacob did 2 years ago, that anyone with a Germanic background would write the handwritten numbers as they are, in particular the 1 and the 7. Together with the water/ glue stains one has to assume that some soaking was going on in the label position at some point. Mute point at this stage I guess :-)
  19. Question on efficient approach to take apart an old crack repair that needs to be re-done (assuming hide glue). I have done it before with strips of wet paper towel placed on the crack (from the inside). Some cling foil reduces the requirement to apply more water quite so often, but also makes it harder when you need to reapply water. It usually takes a few hours to a day for the crack open. Alternatively, I have seen a picture (I think from Jacob) with threads of knitting wool placed on a crack with their ends in a raised pot of water. I guess it's a similar but self-wetting approach. Possibly a little more targeted to the crack rather than the wood adjacent to it. I'm just wondering about using two other ingredients: heat and/or alcohol. As for heat, I'm wondering if it's useful to brush hot water on the crack, soak the paper towel in hot water... and maybe even (carefully) help with a heat gun from time to time. Anyone doing this sort of thing and has some experience? As for alcohol, I have had some good experience in removing tops and fingerboards with a very targeted and careful application of alcohol. I guess this is not suitable to open old crack repairs? It would just make the glue more brittle but you'd still have to break it...and then you'd sill have to clean it. It's sort of the opposite effect on the glue compared to the soaking I guess. I wouldn't consider to try it in the context of opening cracks, but maybe someone has? Any other techniques or tricks out there?
  20. Looks like the "restorer" didn't have an appropriately sized bridge (or tailpiece) at hand I'm just trying to imagine where the bass bar runs when I look at those ffs Fits together with the rather rustic amateur appeal of the rest of the fiddle though.
  21. For what it's worth, I just had some fun experimenting with two very different violas. One 16" viola looking just like a big violin. The string length is surprisingly short at 368 mm. It is easy to play, super responsive, yet powerful and projects very well. I had the pleasure of it clearly coming out on top in a (solo) play-off in a medium-size hall against some more conventional violas of the same body size in just about every way one would care to evaluate. Louder, fuller, richer and overall like a million dollars on a CD. And one 15.5" viola looking like a little cello. Very wide and extremely deep ribs. I find it awkward and uncomfortable to play. The string length is surprisingly long at 378 mm. (note: 10 mm longer that the sting length on the 16" viola above). To get it going you really need to slow down your bow speed (like on a cello). I haven't tested it in a hall but I can tell it doesn't have the same power, even tough the lower strings are more boomy under the ear. What is better? I guess some violists wish they would play the cello; and others wish they would play the violin :-) One justification for a "large" viola I have heard is that if you relate the frequency range of a violin to it's body size and the frequency range of cello to its body size and then work form there to proportionally relate the frequency range of a viola to a target body size, you'll get a body larger than anyone could play, hence, the "as big as you can handle" maxim. I haven't done the maths and I don't know if this is flawed or just BS, but I thought it seems to have some logic. It may not lead to a universally desirable outcome though.
  22. Not sure about the chin rest... but the tailpiece is a favourite object of experimentation not only for wolf elimination but also for sound adjustments. The weight of the tailpiece and the different materials definitely change things up, plus you can experiment with tail gut length and string afterlength. In general terms with wolf elimination it is a trade-off though, as killing the wolf usually comes at the price of some casualties and killing innocent bystanders. You don't want to lose power or richness of sound by "dampening out" a wide range of frequencies including the wolf frequency. You have to be as targeted as possible. Given the complexity of sound production this can be a challenge. Conceptually, I like the idea of adding weights to the afterlength of a sting and "tuning" it to the offending frequency.
  23. Doesn't look too bad overall. The various interventions and repairs the instrument has had over its life look somewhat on the rough side, but not incompetent. On average, this instrument has been luckier than most. I would not feel the need to get into any kind of woodwork. The pegs may work well again with some fresh dressing (which is required periodically anyways). The shanks of the pegs look fairly thick, meaning the holes in the pegbox are fairly large already (again), leaving little room to re-shape things. I guess if you do anything more than dress them, you'd be asking for undue trouble. I would, however, put on a Wittner tailpiece with integrated fine tuners. As for the internal repairs it is difficult to envisage from your description. Cleats are usually glued across the grain, so they don't crack with the plate. If there are inlaid patches (like a sound post patch), a part of the plate was carved out and filled in with new wood, leaving the inside surface and thickness of the plate similar to what it was. These patches are glued in with the grain, but often "off" by one or two grain lines to give more strength. The two most common patches are the rather common sound post patch or the less common chest patch (which you may have here). A chest patch is quite an involved repair that one is unlikely to encounter on a student instrument. But of course it does happen.
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