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Fyldefiddler

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  1. Having checked this out with a wood expert, it seems that it is indeed slab cut maple. Further research shows that a number of Amati’s instruments were made with slab cut backs, and the two piece gives more stability than one piece back. There is certainly no evidence on mine of shrinkage and opening of the back centre joint.
  2. Thanks for the input. You’ve all got me thinking now. in terms of the label, it was printed, but had misspellings eg Steiner not Stainer, and Abson not Absom. More fundamentally, I took it out because the dendro “proved” it could not be correct. I’ve still got it but felt it would be misleading to leave it there if I ever did end up selling it. Isn’t this the right thing to do? I quite agree that the later date plus a few extra only indicates the earliest possible date of making, but the two very respected luthiers who have looked at it we’re both of the view that it was 18th century, though couldn’t put a name to it. I’m not a wood expert either, so perhaps should not have been so definitive in my earlier reply. The wood is very definitely not painted, but I will look try checking with an expert to confirm my sense that it is maple rather than walnut. If walnut, where, if anywhere was that used for backs?
  3. Definitely not painted but I think it is maple rather than walnut.
  4. Here is exactly what the report said. It was very brief :” the two halves are very offset in time, the bass side ending at 1626 and the treble side, whose overlapping section with the bass shows very good correspondence, ends much later at 1736. The cross matching response with this wood is quite Bavarian/ German/ Austrian with a few English. “ I was really confused by the time difference on the two sides I must admit. The pictures probably don’t do it justice but there is great patina in the wood.
  5. Here is exactly what the report said. It was very brief :” the two halves are very offset in time, the bass side ending at 1626 and the treble side, whose overlapping section with the bass shows very good correspondence, ends much later at 1736. The cross matching response with this wood is quite Bavarian/ German/ Austrian with a few English. “ I was really confused by the time difference on the two sides I must admit. The pictures probably don’t do it justice but there is great patina in the wood.
  6. Thanks very much Jacob. I hadn’t read that post. Any suggestions as to what this might be then?
  7. Thank you Michael. Here’s some more pics.
  8. Oops sorry. The files of pics haven’t worked. I’ll add them in stages as there are quite a few. Another thing to note is that it has had a neck graft that someone suggested might have been done in the Hill workshop?
  9. I’ve had this violin for three years now, having bought it with the neck off and looking like it hadn’t been played for an extremely long time. I absolutely love it and play it daily. The sound is deep and rich, very melancholic but it took time to tease out at the higher end, especially on the g string. Maybe from lack of playing, but it is great now. It had a fake Jacob Stainer label inside, which I have now removed. I had dendro done on the front by Peter Ratcliffe, which showed the two halves very offset in time. The bass is 1626 and the treble side 1736, but there is good correspondence between them, suggesting the wood is from the same huge tree. The style is highly arched, and the growth on the front, especially at the centre, is extremely fine. The school is deeply cut and the final turn comes a long way round. The bee stings in the purfling are very sharp and go right into the corners. The back is maple with pieces selected to create a lovely sunburst style effect that I’ve never seen before. Back length is 351, and the stop is 195. Hard to measure the bout width as it would get too distorted by the arching. The dendro cross matching with the wood said “quite Bavarian/German/Austrian with a few English “ which can leaves a lot to go at. Hence my request for help. I’m leaning towards wondering (hoping!) it might be Leopoldo Widhalm perhaps, but would really appreciate some expert opinions, especially from Jacob please. I plan to keep this forever as I love it so much, and look forward to hearing your comments.
  10. Many thanks Jacob. I will look much more carefully at the cello from now on. And it does sound very nice too.
  11. My apologies. I’m aware that painted purfling is one indicator and that you wrote a checklist of Mittenwald v Mk Violin characteristics but was having some trouble applying these to this cello. I also admit to being misled by the short back length. It would be great if you could link to your previous comments please. I’m sure others would also appreciate this.
  12. Thank you Jacob. Can you help my ignorance by indicating what makes it so clearly Schonbach please?
  13. You guys were great in helping me re the bow that goes with this cello, so here goes- I’m trusting to your generous expertise again. The cello is quite short - lob 738 - and whilst I feel I ought to think it is German, I am hovering about it possibly being English. Not sure about whether the neck and scroll is original. It seems to be made of beech but then possibly the front is also beech I think. The purfling on both back and front , where it is a single black line, is painted on and wearing away in places. The arching is pretty low, and a bit misrepresented in the photos I think . All comments most welcomed.
  14. I’m pretty sure the underside is not steel but silver, as are the screws. The adjuster also seems to be silver and works perfectly.
  15. Thank you so much everyone for the very helpful observations. I’m assuming it is German as the head is certainly polished not matte, though the triangle v pentagon is not so clear to me. Regardless, it is lovely to play with and that is the key thing.
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