sospiri

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  1. I've been doing some research into this. It could be Arne Saknussemm? http://www.erbzine.com/mag30/3037.html
  2. Some underslides look like they were designed to punish the unwary. To me, the best design would be one which causes no damage if the bridge falls.
  3. Agreed. A V groove pinches the string. It can then break or unwind or the winding can bunch up, causing it to break anywhere along the string.
  4. Damage from the underslide is a fault in design. It shouldn't happen.
  5. Umm yeah, I love Davide's videos, but what's will all that tapping? It looks too mystical to me.
  6. What causes the changes in speed of sound in the wood? Is it figure or rays? Does more figure or rays slow the speed of sound?
  7. Maybe that is one of the advantages of arching, that an old instrument, even one with low arching can survive without splitting, it just sinks a tiny bit? Also, maybe that's another advantage of using hide glue, it can accommodate movement by hygroscopic action?
  8. Scots Pine can be very straight and even grained. I wonder if it is of any use in violin making? It's slightly denser than Spruce.
  9. He died in 1893 so if it was him, it's held all this time. So, just how brutal was your vibrato?
  10. And yet I considered every one of those points before I posted.
  11. Both. Look at the scroll on the Leduc and compared it to some of the Bergonzi attributed violins of the 1730s https://www.roger-hargrave.de/PDF/Artikel/Strad/Artikel_2000_09_Seeking_MRS_Guarneri_PDF.pdf
  12. I thought of that, but there are several of them from the 1730s.