Violinjon

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  1. I believe (based off of photos posted in another thread) that the OP is in Korea. Unfortunately things are like this in Asia. Unscrupulous sellers are more than happy to jack up the price of a low-quality old instrument because everyone wants to buy an "antique" and they don't know any better. The OP is already doing better than normal by asking for second opinions To the original poster: The photos are not great, but both instruments appear to be older student-quality instruments, the first one (even to my untrained eyes) looks to be a Markneukirchen instrument because of the rib jo
  2. It's overall in very nice condition, which is part of why I dont want to muck around with the neck and saddle if possible. I understand about the bridge of course, the problem is that where I live there is a severe shortage of qualified luthiers so it will mean giving up my violin for weeks if I want to try a lower bridge, then making a new bridge (my orchestra is lucky to be working as this part of the world has the pandemic under control, and I use it for work). I was fearing Jacob's answer but I'm sure he is right. Here's a more straightforward question:,how does a shorter bridge
  3. Hello, quick player's question here. How would have violin setup have changed from the 19th century to current day? As a player and not a luthier, I've been paying attention to the obvious external factors (neck setting, saddle, bridge height). My mid 19th century French violin supposedly has a more or lesson original setup (feel free to disagree, I know that neck angle has likely shifted over time - does this decrease overstand?). I can't vouch for extreme accuracy in my measurements but I measure the neck overstand at about 4.5mm and the saddle height at about 5mm. Currently t
  4. The script is Hangul, the Korean alphabet. Not Chinese symbols. Doesn't change anything about the cellos of course. Original poster - please don't waste any money on cellos from private individuals. You don't know what you are doing, and in the desire to get a "deal" you will waste 100% of your money (well, maybe 95% of it). If you are located in Korea, best to go to the biggest most well known shops in the 2 biggest cities and get something in your budget. You will have a much lower chance of being scammed. I live in East Asia too and it's the Wild West over here. I met a you
  5. It's an Honoré Derazey! It's a beautiful violin that didn't come cheap, but overall it seemed like an exceptional example and it also has an extremely robust but nice sound. The violin supposedly has hever had the top taken off and has no repaired cracks, although it does have some wear from playing. I've been curious about the "moustache" for a while, since I haven't seen any Derazey with such an extreme amount of splotching. The violin does seem to have been shined up before I purchased it - does the consensus seem to be that it's been retouched? It would be a pity, as otherwise i
  6. Hello all, I've been curious about something on my H. Derazey violin. Besides the usual scroll chamfer blackening, the rib corners and f holes are blackened. There also appears to be some blacking around the edges of the ribs where it meets the plates. Hopefully it's not just dirt collecting! I've never seen it so pronounced and even before, if deliberate, is this a French thing or would earlier Italian violins have this as well? There's also a rather large amount of splotchy black antiquing in front of the bridge. Is this done using some kind of paint?
  7. Sorry to say that it's not even Ferras. That's (a young) Nathan Milstein! https://www.thestrad.com/playing-and-teaching/i-just-try-not-to-spoil-it-nathan-milstein-on-bach/11547.article Here's a later photo of him with a similar angle. His Strad sure has strong flaming!
  8. I meant it in the spirit of continually improving oneself! Certainly not in whatever critical spirit is possessing certain others today. I suppose I should have been more tactful and sent a PM instead. I certainly don't want to discourage others from posting their own videos! The OP says he is an amateur violinist, and he plays very well for one. Although the quality of the video is not so good it's enough to tell that the violin is working well for the player, and that's what matters when considering violins in this (very low) price range.
  9. Sounds nice and nice playing! I can't contribute anything about that violin other than that you already have some real experts commenting on it previously. I will note as a player, though, that the F on the first beat of bar 7 should be F natural, not F sharp
  10. Oddly enough you can buy them online (along with TI) at the new official web shop. https://shop.thomastik-infeld.com/en/catalogsearch/result/?q=+Rondo+violin Good strings, overall character is something like Dominants but juiced up and with better and faster break in. The tension noticeably higher than Dominant, my violin was choked by the high tension D (which is silver - I get the same with almost every high tension silver D). Wish they had an aluminum option, like the TIs and PIs do, as my violin always gets along with those. I have a colleague whose violin I thought would be
  11. I'm just a player, not expert, but I'd give the bow a chance of being French. Reasons: button being (I think, pictures aren't great) wider than the stick, octagonal facets passing through the grip, and the general shape of the frog and tip (remind me of C.N. Bazin "school"). Cons: Button ebony is wide and tip bottom curves up. Both features are more prominent in German bows, but can be found in French as well.
  12. My orchestra has cycled in and out of work during the lockdowns this year, so I've had lots of down time to experiment with strings on my (relatively) new-to-me violin. I've discovered that it really likes low tension strings, and I'm loving the sound of Eudoxas, although Dominants work great as well. Being bored I've tried almost every gauge of the G and D strings, and it's been interesting to see how they effect sound - my violin seems to like the light (not lightest) gauge ones. I'm curious about the loop ends that wound gut strings have - I've occasionally seen players from the past,
  13. Ebay is definitely on my bad side now. Sorry to rant (I've done it before) but you'd understand if you went through what I did. I used to buy some good stuff off of Ebay (mainly German violin bows). This summer I moved to a new rented flat (I live in East Asia). The week I got my new internet service installed I got an email from ebay stating "Hello jontheviolinist, It looks like your account jontheviolinist is associated with another account, bluedistri0, which is currently restricted on eBay. As a result, we've restricted the jontheviolinist account until you can resolve our c
  14. The head plate appears to be without a liner (ebony or otherwise). Are there any nice bows (other then some old English bows like Dodd) where this is found? The tip plate (if original) looks very German with the tip tip not rising up past the wood.
  15. I'm not an expert, but I've owned a number of Nurnbergers. Looks legit to me, probably a Carl Albert Nurnberger judging by the head. Frog looks like it's been filed slightly around the thumb projection, which is a shame but it's not too severe (some cracks around that area as well but not too bad). The odd pin on the back of the frog might have been added later? Let us know what you find out.