Bill Merkel

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About Bill Merkel

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  1. Bill Merkel

    EIDs

    I'm in the biz too, and spent ten years specifically in security, a lot of it involving banking. Your thinking that this would be trusted because bitcoin is...if you could emphasize to the customer that it is "like bitcoin" and it stuck it would have more of a chance. Not recognizing the human factors difference between this and bitcoin would be deadly and I've seen lots of money thrown away from not recognizing this kind of thing. Also, bitcoin arose around this and is very appropriate to it in every way. Not so in the least with violins. Plus it isn't necessary. Bitcoin was necessary or inevitable. This looks like a waste. But I've been pondering what could be done with a chip alone, without all the overhead. It might be possible to test it against a secret held by the maker. Which is not the best security, but...it's a common mostly successful strategy. The market wouldn't be violins of course, though the violins might be good advertising.
  2. Bill Merkel

    EIDs

    Since you're so smug... I'll explain it properly for you. I don't say you couldn't make use of. I say it's unnecessary and not practical. It not being done is all the evidence you need for that. If you insist on a chip, it could be an index into an immutable database and then you could discover the chip is fake. But now you have a chip and a database, and at least one private/public key pair for the maker to maintain! And have lost compared to a maker just having pics in his filing cabinet. The first maker that claims a fake has appeared -- the whole enterprise is no good anymore; it's no longer trusted. Which is an interesting case where where individual personal database is preferable to a distributed one.
  3. Bill Merkel

    EIDs

    It isn't. You always follow me around here contradicting whatever I say, like Danube vs. Burgess. Since you've solved the problem of counterfeiting call the Secret Service and let them know.
  4. Bill Merkel

    EIDs

    I don't think any changes need to be made... I'm just commenting on the topic. If it was really possible for an instrument to carry its own guarantee of authenticity through time immemorial I'd probably do it, cos why not. Anything short of that, the traditional ways are just as good and probably more fun. If it was possible, it'd be used on everything.
  5. Bill Merkel

    EIDs

    Sure it is. It's the wallet we're talking about. The endpoint. The problem is what I said above. It comes down to you can make (forge) a chip to give any response you want to a scan. When the strategy inevitably resorts to a "trusted entity" it would make much more sense for the entity to just have the free built-in fingerprint of every instrument; its photo.
  6. Bill Merkel

    EIDs

    You guys are missing some important stuff. Ultimately bitcoin is secure simply because of a password. You distribute that password so the violin chip can be read in the field and you can fake a chip. You keep the password secret, and you might as well just simply have a nice low tech pic of the top on file with the maker.
  7. Bill Merkel

    EIDs

    Sorry, I didn't mean that the way it sounded. I don't have the wit to think that up on purpose :)
  8. Bill Merkel

    EIDs

    A possibility, using dendro. You could record all your wood by region and year. A copier would then have to obtain that exact wood somehow. Nah. Holes in that.
  9. Bill Merkel

    EIDs

    Dude. What are you doing awake? You have violins to make. Think microphotography, then. No way that structure could be duplicated.
  10. Bill Merkel

    EIDs

    Now that's an interesting idea. Sometime in the future just scan for the maker's DNA. If it's a good violin, then use the scan data to virtually clone him and download CNC data from the virtual maker so he can make you a personal violin. By that era though you should be able to time travel and just commission one. Don't know what kind of waiting list Antonio del Gesu had, but if you survive the time in 17th century your machine should be able to return you to just a second after you left. So you won't be late for work in the morning.
  11. Bill Merkel

    EIDs

    You wouldn't need to remove one from an instrument; just duplicate what it does "given sufficient incentive". Can't think of anything, at least using a scanner out in the field. One unique thing that there would never be sufficient incentive to copy is just the grain recorded in a photo.
  12. Bill Merkel

    Practicing multiple instruments

    When I was a 20-something somebody called me a dilettante and I plotted his death. Didn't go through with it.
  13. Bill Merkel

    Practicing multiple instruments

    You need to figure out what you're trying to do. It's like you bought a bunch of cars without anywhere to drive to. Or a bunch of clothes with nowhere to wear them. I knew a super multi instrumentalist, band and orchestra instruments, but the way he'd ended up it was out of necessity. After about twenty years, when I knew him, he didn't practice at all, didn't need to for what he needed to do, and spent most of his time playing cards.
  14. Bill Merkel

    "I have a dream..."

    Is it a museum or a store? I don't think waiting lists would be a problem if you've got the green, unless maybe the maker in question is a crank. If it's strictly a museum you might look for a Paul Allen model that applies.
  15. Bill Merkel

    Bow leather for pinky

    Ah. I assumed your picture was of your bow.