JacksonMaberry

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About JacksonMaberry

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    Enthusiast
  • Birthday 04/26/1989

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  • Interests
    Violins, early keyboards, conducting, hiking, wine, spirits, cooking

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  1. These are varnishes I have tried but did not enjoy using. I now make and use my own varnishes - an article on how to make them will be coming out in the next issue of the VSA'S "The Scroll" Joe Robson's Greek Pitch Brown and Gold - these are essentially full. Originally $75 each, asking $55. Old wood Brescia Brown Varnish - half empty (30ml remaining). Originally $80, asking $35. Vernici Liuteria Orange Madder Rosinate, Brown Iron Rosinate, and Yellow Luteola Rosinate. Half of the orange, a third of the yellow, and a quarter of the brown remain. Asking $50 for the set of three. Thanks, Jackson
  2. I have the posters of the 1668 and 1679 unaltered stainers. At their thinnest, in the flanks, they are barely over a mm. At the thickest, 4mm+
  3. A man of extremes - pretty dang thick at its thickest, and scary thing at its thinnest.
  4. Remind me of your address and I'll send you a sample.
  5. You've probably already tried limonene and turpineol, but I've found them to satisfy all three, and it doesn't take much
  6. It's a monoterpene derived from orange peels, a byproduct of the orange juice industry. Buy technical grade limonene on amazon.
  7. Don, what ratio of oil to resin do you prefer? I had been using 1:1 but have switched to 3:2 and find thinner unnecessary now. The film is more durable/ less friable and, when using iron rosinate, doesn't tack nearly as quick.
  8. I have a massive stock of northern Idaho Engelmann spruce, harvested by Kevin Prestwich - as many can attest here, the man knows wood. Variety of densities available, from .33 to .45. It is currently in very rough billets, and I will be hand splitting it and surfacing it all, as well as processing block, lining, and bassbar material. Violin belly - $60 Viola belly - $80 Cello belly - $300 Blocks and linings: violin and viola - $15 Blocks and linings: cello - $30 Split bassbars: violin and viola - $8 Split bassbars: cello - $16 Hand jointed billets available for an additional fee. Small amount of black willow and paulownia block and lining stock, price on request. VID_20201125_200632~2.mp4
  9. Not japanese, but I would strongly encourage you to consider the scroll gouges offered by Karlsson out of Sweden. Small family forge that makes the gouges for the students at Mittenwald. I have a set and consider them my finest tools.
  10. D- limonene is inexpensive and good for removing rosin buildup. I would have reservations about using it on any instrument about which I was uncertain of the varnish composition (any solvent, really, including water).
  11. Varnish maker's linseed oil from Wood finishing Enterprises is perfect right out of the bottle and cheap.
  12. That's much more diplomatic than I would expect, Jacob. But possibly for the best. I sometimes get the chance to show my work to more experienced makers, and I always ask them to be very honest with criticism. It's a good way to learn.