Andreas Preuss

Members
  • Content count

    938
  • Joined

  • Last visited

1 Follower

About Andreas Preuss

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    preuss.tokyo
  • Yahoo
    delgesu1735@yahoo.com

Profile Information

  • Location
    Tokyo

Recent Profile Visitors

871 profile views
  1. Andreas Preuss

    The ground ( sealing) of the great masters - which was it ?

    Back to the original topic: Tung oil was nothing I would suspect as an ingredient of the ground. The idea of diluting oil to the extreme is however interesting. I have been thinking for varnish application in the same direction.
  2. Andreas Preuss

    The ground ( sealing) of the great masters - which was it ?

    Kremer sells always very good products and they are selling Tung oil. If you have any doubts about purity you can ask them.
  3. Andreas Preuss

    Stradivari's secret was a concept?

    Thats what I am thinking. He was faster and more efficient than others around. Not that he pushed fiddles out like in a factory, but maybe 20 - 30% more than others. For what reason seems to be debatable, was it because of simply better honed working skills or was it because of new tool inventions. Despite some disagreements here on MN I am inclined to believe rather the latter.
  4. Andreas Preuss

    Stradivari's secret was a concept?

    Not a bad assumption. Then it would be up to the customers judgement what he likes for the sound and elegantly eliminating the biggest risk factor for selling: sound issues.
  5. Andreas Preuss

    Stradivari's secret was a concept?

    This would explain the marking of the mould inside the pegbox. The neck was attached to the ribs and stored away. Because the mould is not so apparent on the loose ribs the inscription in the interior peg box makes sense to identify the original mould.
  6. Andreas Preuss

    Stradivari's secret was a concept?

    Strads workmanship declined maybe the last 5 years or so, but still better than late Guads. 175 DGs? I thought Bob Bein came up with 116 or 117.
  7. Andreas Preuss

    Stradivari's secret was a concept?

    Sure, that is what you can do if you think at the extreme. Do you still work at this speed? How are those fast instruments valued on the market? Do they have recognizable signature features? BUT why wasn't everyone producing at the same level as Strad the same number of instruments? Guadagnini is pretty similar for active years and was aided by one of his sons. Number of instruments is similar, quality never reaches the sophistication of Strad and the speedier he gets at the end of his life, the sloppier he works. Giobatta Morassi claims to have made 1000 instruments. I simply can't see him at the same level as Strad.
  8. Andreas Preuss

    Stradivari's secret was a concept?

    I was thinking about this a lot and I think there might be another small misinterpretation by Sacconi. The inside tracings were simply to locate the points of the ff. Once the points were open the paper template was used on the outside to do the rest. IMHO this is the most efficient way to work with this system.
  9. Andreas Preuss

    Stradivari's secret was a concept?

    It depends from which year you start the calculation He started working 'on his own' if we can say so in a family of violin makers, around 1726, this would make something like total average of 6 - 7 per year. But at the end he didn't work at a high standard any more. I think this number goes as well with numbers in guild regulations in cities where this existed. I vaguely remember that a guild in Germany allowed makers 6 instruments, so this was enough for a living and to support a family. (need to find the reference for this) Anyway, Carlo Bergonzi is probably the best comparison because he worked alone and at the same level as Strad for all his instruments I don't think that he produced more than 6 instruments per year.
  10. Andreas Preuss

    Stradivari's secret was a concept?

    Bob Beins counting of DG went to 116 or 117 existing instruments. The peak of Strads by year on the label is 32. (Goodkind) That's exactly the reason why I think he inserted the label when he sold the instrument and this doesn't have anything to do with the year it was really made. We have something like 50 Carlo Bergonzis and I don't think too many were lost.
  11. Andreas Preuss

    Stradivari's secret was a concept?

    That's the point, personality and good taste plus high performance quality. Not so easy at a peak production rate of 16 violins and 1.5 cellos per year. and why did only very few makers of the rest of the crowd not work at the same precision level? Pietro Guarneri Mantova made only very few instruments, Giovanni Battista Gabrielle is the same. Carlo Bergonzi who worked definitely at the same level made maybe 3-4 instruments per year. If you multiply this by 2 because Strad was aided by at least Francesco, you get to 8 instruments. Sorry, not a red herring to me.
  12. Andreas Preuss

    Stradivari's secret was a concept?

    I found something interesting about ancient fret saws. Apparently it was invented by a German clock maker and further developed to cut wood by Andre Charles Boulle, cabinet maker to Louis XIV.
  13. Andreas Preuss

    Stradivari's secret was a concept?

    Were there fret saws in the 18th century? Not that I know. Just manufacturing the blades looks extremely time consuming if done by hand.
  14. Andreas Preuss

    Stradivari's secret was a concept?

    This kind of speed only works if you repeat the same job every day. (For conspiracy theorists: Marco Polo not only imported from China the idea of spaghetti to the Italians but also how to work really fast.)
  15. Andreas Preuss

    Stradivari's secret was a concept?

    Now i see what you mean. But etching doesn't guarantee a fast clean cut. Andrew Dipper is convinced that Strad used a tiny hand saw. He mailed me one for this purpose and I only found it difficult and time consuming to use. So I thought there must be a better way.