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GeorgeH

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Posts posted by GeorgeH

  1. Apparently Simson & Frey was renamed to Scherl & Roth in 1932 where they continued to be U.S. distributors for Roth violins. This is different than the history described on the current Roth website.

    "After a few brief jobs in violin departments of other companies, Roth’s expertise led him to manage the Simson & Frey violin department, where his reputation grew throughout the United States and abroad. In 1932, upon the retirement of Herman Simsom, Roth teamed with Max Scherl to buy the Simson & Frey firm. They renamed it Scherl & Roth. In 1938, the company moved from New York to Cleveland, Ohio, an early hub of violin manufacturing in the U.S."

    https://www.conn-selmer.com/en-us/our-brands/scherl-and-roth

     

  2. @Bardan

    It is a beautiful tune, one of my favorites, and often attributed to O'Carolan. It has an amusing story (legend?) behind it:

     

    Captain Francis O'Neill[3] suggests

    Proud and spirited, he resented anything in the nature of trespass on his dignity. Among his visits to the houses of Scottish nobility, he is said to have called at Eglinton Castle, Ayrshire. Knowing he was a harper, but being unaware of his rank, Lady Eglinton commanded him to play a tune. Taking oftence at her peremptory manner, Ó Catháin refused and left the castle. When she found out who her guest was her ladyship sought and effected a speedy reconciliation. This incident furnished a theme for one of the harper’s best compositions. “Tabhair Damh do Lámh,” or “Give Me Your Hand!” The name has been latinized into “Da Mihi Manum.” The fame of the composition and the occasion which gave birth to it reaching the ear of King James the Sixth, induced him to send for the composer. Ó Catháin accordingly attended at the Scottish court, and created a sensation.

     

  3. 5 hours ago, Dimitri Musafia said:

    GeorgeH, I'm curious, and you seem to be in the know. So let me ask, did the Swiss actually lead the market for lower and middle-priced watches as well? 

    While the global demand for watches grew dramatically over time, the %share of the global production for Swiss watches dropped from almost 60% to under 10%. 

    I don't know how that how that breaks out into the lower and middle-priced categories. 

    Share-of-Swiss-watch-production-in-globa

  4. The point is that the Swiss Watch industry used to lead the world watch market, now it has become mostly a niche industry for status symbol luxury watches, which I suppose is fine for the players in that industry, but most of the Swiss Watch industry is long gone. As @Shelbow points out they missed the boat on the wearable tech market, but long before that they missed the boat on digital technology as inexpensive Japanese-made digital watches killed the sales of Swiss-made mechanical watches.

    It is doubtful that Cremonese makers are going to ever compete successfully in the low-priced quality mass-produced instrument space, so they will have to establish their individual brands as niche producers of high-end premium-quality violins, and then they will be competing against each other and other international makers. It remains to be seen if the cachet of a "Cremonese violin" alone will continue to command premium market value in the future, particularly if the quality is highly variable.

    When you buy an authentic Rolex, you know what you're buying, but not so much with a "Cremonese violin."

    @Dimitri Musafia

    There are many many things that remain valuable, in-demand, and have high resale values long after the original sale by the firm that made them, but that does not help keep a firm in business if the marketplace stopped buying their new products. 

    On the bright side for violin makers, I don't think that we can expect to see an Apple violin anytime soon.

  5. 6 hours ago, Shelbow said:

    The Swiss watch industry is an example of how to weather the storm of international competition and come out on top.

    Well, I would not hold the Swiss watch industry as an example. It has continued to decline for decades. Sales of the Apple Watch alone outsold the entire Swiss Watch industry in 2020.

    Quote

    In 2015, the year the Apple Watch was launched, LVMH watch division president and Tag Heuer CEO Jean-Claude Biver said the Swiss industry was not afraid of Apple’s new product, because it could not be repaired in a thousand years or eighty years, nor inherited by children, nor would it ever become a status symbol. As is always the case when disruption occurs in an industry, traditional competitors are not able to see the threat, and continue to try to analyze it according to the variables that were important yesterday.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/enriquedans/2020/02/07/how-apple-killed-the-swiss-watchindustry/?sh=56d038eb60ce

  6. 3 minutes ago, Strad O Various Jr. said:

    You are just ignorant, I've had two grafted high end Roths in my own possession, same with high end Juzeks, the highest level Markneukirchen violins were often grafted originally, quit acting like your some kind of expert when you're not.

    And how you know the grafts were original on the Roths? Did you buy them from the factory when they were new?

  7. 22 minutes ago, Strad O Various Jr. said:

    Wrong again, the high end Roth violins were often grafted original to manufacture

    Well, of course, I could be "wrong again," but not a single Roth among the dozens photographed in the Tarisio archives has a grafted neck. I have also personally owned several high-end Roths including 2 X-Rs, from the 20's, and neither had a grafted neck.

     

     

     

  8. Send pictures and description to Mr. Roth. It looks right for a Roth model to me. The neck graft would not be original to a Roth. Your luthier was correct in preventing you from removing the label.

    The bows look like nice bows that were likely made under contract to specification for the EHR firm. From the ones I have seen, the bows with the EHR brand are superior to the Sivori and Leon Pique brands that were often sold with Roth outfits. I have never seen a gold-mounted EHR bow before. Nice!

    Too bad the EHR firm does not have records of where they bought their bows. It is very unlikely that EHR I was making bows himself.

  9. 12 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

    you did

    Ah, I see. That is a misunderstanding.

    The expression "Hang one's hat" has nothing to do with democratic processes or voting.

    "Hang one's hat" is an American English idiom that infers "To settle or take up residence somewhere." In this case, I was using the expression to say that people are free to choose whatever individual opinion they settle on. 

    I hope that clears that up.

  10. 2 hours ago, martin swan said:

    As Jacob says, violins are not identified by a democratic voting process.

    Having looked at some additional pictures from the OP in PMs, I agree with the consensus that the rib joins appear pinched, and the violin is likely of Saxon origin.

    I don't think that anybody here proposed that violin identification is a democratic voting process.

    Obviously we all find it interesting to read about and discuss violins that are posted on MN, and opinions will differ, even expert opinions. Civil discussions sharing ideas and observations are how we all learn. At least that is how I learn, anyway.

  11. It's violin with mixed signals. If the linings are let-in, that is pretty much definitive that it is not Saxon. We can't tell for certain, but the tapered linings going into the blocks are an indication to me that they are let-in, plus the OPs description that the blocks are asymmetric. Also, the purfling is very close to edge, and the bottom rib appears to have been originally one piece, two more indications of a Mittenwald box.

    So one can choose to think that the "notch" (which could have easily been added when the ribs and saddle were modified) and the grafted scroll (which may not even be original) are stronger signals of the origin than the features OP and I have pointed out. Nothing wrong with difference of opinions. Everybody gets to hang their hat where they choose. :)

     

  12. 11 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

    Well, you're wrong then

    Why? If you look closely at the linings, they taper before meeting the corner blocks suggesting strongly that they are inserted into the blocks. We can't know for sure without taking off the top, but if the linings are inserted and the bottom rib started life as one piece, it isn't likely a Saxon box. Plus, that purfling...

  13. 2 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

    If you are using my old “quiz for Addie” (RIP) instructions, you should take it a bit more literally. Scroll fluting going “to the bitter end” means exactly that, and not 8 o’clockish. The rib joint ends seem to me to have the joints more or less centrally, and at the end block, you have the typical Saxon notch in the back, marking the centre line. Altogether hardly controversial to call the fiddle Saxon

    The bottom rib looks like it may have been one-piece originally, and the saddle once was set into the rib. The rib joins are ambiguous, but on-the-whole look mitered to me. From the description of the OP, the corner blocks are consistant with inserted linings, and the linings look like they taper-in before meeting the blocks. The purfling is very close to the edge. There also appear to be tooth-plane marks in the back interior.

    On the other hand, it is hard for me to tell from the picture if there is a delta at the base of the scroll, and I can't see how deep the fluting goes from the pictures. There is what appears to be a  notch on the bottom plate, typical of Markneukirchen violins.

    I am leaning toward mid-19c. Mittenwald.

     

  14. Follow-up:

    I received this bow back from @Josh Henry who did a magnificent restoration on it. It is a fine bow by Johann Christian Suess. All the original parts of the frog were retained, and only the minimum amount of wood was replaced. And, importantly, Josh was a great person to work with.

    The "Before cleaning" pictures are at the beginning of the thread. Here are some Before-After restoration pictures:

     

    Frog_Before.jpg

    frog_after.jpg

    frog_after2.jpg

    Frog&Head_Small.jpg

  15. 1 hour ago, Matthias Lange said:

    It seems that whatever caused it to break, also moved the bridge several millimeters towards the bass side. It must have been a quite strong impact. 

    Please put the bridge back into the correct position and check your violin for cracks and other damage.

    I am not sure how it was playable with the G-string almost off the fingerboard! 

    But, yes, get thee to a lutherie!

  16. I am not a luthier, but I am curious as to why nobody has suggested an inside cheek after closing the crack followed by insertion of a carbon-fiber bushing if the peg hole isn't too big. This repair can be very close to invisible.

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