Mark Norfleet

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About Mark Norfleet

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  1. To be clear, some of the things being mentioned here are not transparent dyes or even soluble in alcohol, but are pigments or colorants that are easily dispersed in alcohol based varnishes.
  2. Agreed. I don’t know that I’ve ever used “lamp black”, but I’ve been using the same 2 ounce container of “ivory black” for at least 30 years. I think I have about 30 years worth left...
  3. It was the quick inventory he did before leaving a room he had been in for a while. As I said, he was a fascinating character...
  4. He was always a generous, supportive and fascinating character. Watch, wallet, testicles, spectacles.
  5. I've never heard David claim that he has lucky wood.
  6. To distill some other thoughts that were in my head when I posted yesterday, "crash , bang wallop" making likely leaves many areas of impediment to an instrument sounding as well as it could. There is a great deal of information available regarding arching and graduations. Those experiments have been done by many for a few hundred years... There's no good reason to re-do them unless one has something quite aberrant in mind to experiment with. My opinion is that it's best to work toward refining as many skills as possible at once. If a maker is not certain what they want to do with graduat
  7. Excellent points! There's an awful lot of learning and experience behind each hand movement. I still remember vividly watching one of my teachers bending, fitting and gluing the purfling into a cello back all at once. To be more clear, he was bending and fitting the corners AFTER having put the glue in the channel.
  8. Probably. It doesn’t have a label. It’s part of a collection that the University of Michigan owns. I was asked to make it playable a few weeks ago and one of the violin profs will apparently be doing some recording with it.
  9. Yes, that varnish is minimally damaged. You -might- find this useful...
  10. I think you have to ask Monsanto.
  11. At violin making school I learned that despite all of my prior experience, coffee can really be rather good. That led me into a bottomless portafilter rabbit hole. I also learned while interacting with fellow students, the instructors at the school, and colleagues I've spent time with in the decades after, that there was a wealth of information, opinions about how the final results should look, and many methods to choose from to get there while I made instruments and did other violin related work. That in person observation, exposure to others and hands on experience in their presence was
  12. The jacks get trashed, but if they’re made of bass wood/linden they’re strong enough to do the job and are easily cut away. The pillars I can often re-use. Depending on where they are and access, I either saw them off or use a diagonal cutter I’ve modified to have more acute jaws. It’s not obvious, but if you look closely at the photo you can see that the grain of the pillars is parallel to that of the top, so they split off fairly easily.
  13. I don’t think that’s a pin on the eyelet. It’s what a machinist would refer to as a ”tit”. It’s simply a result of the last bit of metal breaking when the part was being cut off from the stock.