MarkBouquet

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About MarkBouquet

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    Enthusiast

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    mlbouquet@msn.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    San Francisco Peninsula, CA USA
  • Interests
    Music, violin playing/making, woodworking/furniture design/making, bicycling, I'm owned by a dog,

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  1. Don't forget that you'll need a dust collector, and hearing protection.
  2. This discussion makes me like my hypoallergenic Wittner chinrests even more.
  3. Your Ibanez has "humbucker" pickups, characteristic on Les Pauls and their clones, while the Squire undoubtedly had single coil pickups, characteristic of Fender guitars and their clones. Humbuckers, as the name suggests, have less hum, but single coils have a more visceral, penetrating tone. When you're rocking the arena that hum hardly matters. I've had my Shih-Tsu going on six years now. When I got her at the shelter they estimated that she was four. It's amazing how much I've adapted my life to her idiosyncrasies. She can be a real pain in the a$$, and was a really bad financial investment too. But no one loves you like your dog, and I have no regrets. She has no regrets either.
  4. Wow! That very fiddle was on a Stones album! I think it should have it's own guard detail when it travels, like Il Canone. Bruce Carlsen, are you looking after this one too?
  5. Like Minnie Pearl leaving the price tags hanging from her hats, I'd think whoever buys this stuff would want to do likewise.
  6. I'm not a bow expert but I'm thinking that just because your screw doesn't fit the one imperial and one metric eyelets that you have doesn't necessarily prove that it's not some other imperial or metric size/pitch. I'd get out my screw thread pitch gages and try to find a match, and my calipers to look for a rationale for the screw diameter. That would be a start, at least.
  7. I didn't mean to be sarcastic or dismissive of your opinion when I said "don't drop them." We have to handle delicate tools and objects all day, everyday. Like violins themselves, or bows. Should we only have cheap bows because if we drop one it's likely toast, so it might as well be a cheap one? (For some people, and I don't mean you, that might be the best way.) I've spent what is now, alas, most of my life collecting tools, and I've never been willing to compromise on their quality, or in those few cases where I did I inevitably regretted it. Result: I have a workshop full (too full) of beautiful, reliable tools that someone else someday will appreciate acquiring too. So I sincerely meant that. Buy good tools and don't drop them. You can do it.
  8. You could say that about a lot of tools, so just don't drop them.
  9. And the problem these Tormek users are having with CBN wheels seems to be related to the fact that they're running the CBN wheels on Tormeks, in a water bath. There's no reason to run a CBN wheel in a water bath.
  10. The Arizona Woodturner's Association needs a knowledgeable proof reader. CBN wheels are for hardened steel, whether it's HSS or not.
  11. Adrian, you have to get a 30 degree (or maybe a little less) angle at the edge. There's just no getting around that. Back to work.
  12. 25", that's tight. But I guess if it works for you....... Here's my shop space. Big enough for now, anyway. https://www.pastheritage.org/HangarOne.html
  13. I, too, cringe at the thought of using a bench grinder to shape a knife blade. I use diamond honing plates by "Dia-Sharp" and "DMT" to carry out those tasks. I have a 120 mesh (grit) that cuts so efficiently that it really is a practical substitute for a bench grinder for many tasks. And no burning tempers ever. At the other end of the spectrum is my 8000 mesh diamond plate which polishes an edge indistinguishable from my 8000 grit water stone, at least to my eyes, but cuts so much faster that it requires far fewer strokes, and therefore offers fewer opportunities to roll the edge over. My water stones seem increasingly impractical.
  14. 30 degrees on each side adds up to 60 degrees for the whole edge. Is that what you're doing (?), because if it is that's way too blunt. A knife like that should be beveled about 15 degrees per side, for a total of 30 degrees at the edge.
  15. Wouldn't a relative humidity drop also cause the pegbox to shrink, possibly causing the pegs to become tighter?