Resophonic

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About Resophonic

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  1. This apears to be a pretty nice violin. The person that owns it says her grandfather aquired it in the nineteen-teens. Can anyone identify the country of origin or possible attribution to a maker? No label or marks inside. I posted this already at the Fiddle Hangout, please see the images there. http://www.fiddlehangout.com/topic/45313 Thanks!
  2. If you frequent flea markets or resale shops, go through the ladies leather purses. Your likely to find one two that can harvested for suitable grip leather. Old leather gloves may be worth looking at too.
  3. It's already been done, it's called a pencil.
  4. Know any potters? If they are making any Raku firings they will take all the wood shavings you can give them.
  5. Yes, I'm quite familiar with Poplar and have enough on hand for thousands of plugs and wedges. Right now, I'm comfortable with Basswood for spreaders and will stick with that for now. Thanks.
  6. Acually, I have been using an Exact-A-Knifer for exacting chippertation and spreadulization. OK. You better tell Jerry too.
  7. Thanks to the responders. I have been happy with the Basswood for the spreader wedge but not so much with it for the frog and tip. Poplar sounds interesting, kind of in between the hardness of Basswood and Maple.
  8. I am relatively new to bow re-hairing, up to 29 now to date. I have been using Basswood to make my wedges out of but most of the bows I have re-done have had Maple wedges. On one hand, the Basswood is soft enough that cuts easily and there is some squish, much less chance of bow damage if the fit isn't perfect. On the other hand, the Basswood wedge is pretty much a one time use item whereas a good fitting Maple one can be re-used a few times. Pluses, minuses? What are others using and why?
  9. http://woodworker.com/woodtek-patternmakers-vise-mssu-801-802.asp I use one of these pattern maker vices, also brilliant for everything and cheaper. Line the jaws with thick cork.