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Hempel

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Everything posted by Hempel

  1. My notes have links to original archival material, so what? Here are a brief sampling of "my notes" regarding Homolka: (Eduard Emanuel's Homolka's baptismal entry, last entry on page:) http://katalog.ahmp.cz/pragapublica/permalink?xid=D227E4A1D3DA4E84B1E32061236FCA0F&scan=267#scan267 (Eduard, son of Eduard Emanuel H.'s baptismal entry, last entry on page:) http://katalog.ahmp.cz/pragapublica/permalink?xid=A11B00A0A9114DD591DC4236B29E8B83&scan=586#scan586 The collection of documents on this thread provide a good sampling of handwriting from the relevant period (including E.E. Homolka's own handwriting and autograph on his own stationary in the very first post), and anyone who'd mistake the three "Homolka" labels presented on the other thread, which barely rises to a cartoonish level as authentic, should not be taken seriously. That includes Jalovec specimen #192! If you can't understand why those labels on that other thread are spurious then you can only blame your own failed observational powers. (Hint: stroke width varies due to directionality because of the period writing implement used.) We can rubbish your pretentious claims to "objectivity" and "misplaced confidence" too.
  2. Similarly, for E. E. Homolka's father, Ferdinand August Vincenz, who lived in Staré Město in Prague before relocating to its second district, Nové Město. E. E.'s mother's maiden (Germanized) name was Marie Kobertsch. The conscription records show that F.A. Homolka and his wife moved to Vinohrady in 1887, and later in 1905 Eduard Emanual's family joined them at the same residence. Date, cadastral parcel, current derived (approximate) address 1858, 105, Opletalova 27 5/12/1865, 139, Senovážné nám. 980 4/22/1866, 104, Opletalova 27 2/24/1871, 457, Náměstí Republiky 1 1/4/1873, 231, Na Poříčí 1757 6/20/1878, 454, Na Poříčí 1071
  3. A recent thread on false E.E. Homolka labels has prompted me to review my notes. Below is the conscription (residence) record for E. E. Homolka. It shows where the Homolka family resided at various times in Vinohrady. Date, Cadastral parcel, present address (derived*) 11/10/1889, 379, Bělehradská 120 5/20/1891, 565, Slezská 2033/11 11/27/1897, 140, Americká 227 11/15/1904, 482, Not found 12/30/1905, 699, Francouzská 17 *derived addresses are found using: https://www.geoportalpraha.cz/cs/mapy/mapa-online and google maps. The cadastral map below shows that the Homolka family never lived further than 3 blocks from the Saint Ludmila Church while in Vinohrady. The conscription record shows E.E. Homolka's wife was Marie Lomberska, and they had two children named Eduard and Emma. The younger Eduard was also trained as a violin maker, but was tragically killed in WWI.
  4. What makes you think the Jalovec label #192 specimen is any more reliable reference than the photo of the label you posted earlier? What objective evidence do you have that Jalovec label #192 is authentic? Had you bothered to spend time in the Czech archives and tried to verify Jalovec's biographical entries, you would have realized Jalovec's compendium on Czech makers is rife with errors. And that's objective fact. And plenty of objective evidence has been presented on this thread, you're simply ignoring them.
  5. Hempel

    Modern Italian?

    Paul de Wit's "Zeitschrift für Instrumentenbau" is quite a remarkable resource on mass production from 1880-1940 for German-speaking countries (but not exclusively those). I find information there to be much more complete than any book. There's even a series in there on Prague makers written by Homolka which was almost certainly the source for Lütgendorff. Even Wikipedia is effusive in its praise for ZfI: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeitschrift_für_Instrumentenbau
  6. The OP's label is as fake as a US$3 bill and can be spotted a mile away. Relying on random photos off the internet as reference material is a fool's game. The label you posted is fake too, although the faker did a better job on that one. "Vinia(e)" and "Vinea(e)" are alternate spellings and mean "vineyard" in Latin. And Homolka wouldn't have got his Latin conjugation wrong. The name of the fiddle maker in question is "Edvard Emanuel Homolka" so you better have a good explanation why he signed your label "Eman. E. Homolka," switching the ordering. If you spend time in the archives (including indisputably authentic handwriting from EE. Homolka) you can quickly glean what authentic handwriting of the period should look like, including writing implements used. Neither the OP or your label fit in that category.
  7. Just looked up the Latin name for Vinohrady and it's "Viniae." (Latin for "vineyard")
  8. For what it's worth the Homolka family lived in the Vinohrady ("Vineyard") district in Prague. Can't recall the Latin name for it ATM. But the repair label is still fake.
  9. Hempel

    Old viola

    Any rib inserts, bulges etc. are due to width, not length changes in the plates. As for slab cut, you can look up the wood movement coefficients yourself. Length changes are still neglible compared to width. On fiddles with slab cut backs even heavily distorted ones, you don't see ribs splitting apart any more compared to quarter cut back fiddles. You're the one resorting to ad hominem like "suck eggs" and I'm the troll?
  10. Hempel

    Old viola

    In case you still don't get the point regarding LOB, any lengthwise changes in the plates will be negligible, not to mention any lengthwise changes should be equal on both bass and treble sides. Rib lengths changes are also negligible, because otherwise ribs on fiddles will tear themselves apart from shear. Put simply, and length changes (if any), plates and ribs, on the fiddle are uniform. The story is completely different when it comes to width. Those shrinkages will be significant. Fundamental wood properties and engineering principles which you have no understanding.
  11. Hempel

    Old viola

    Any "pushing and shoving" on an old repair is due to width shrinkage, not length is the point. And celli are significantly longer than violas. On the OP's viola there's no evidence transverse compromise in the rib garland either, something you'd expect to see if there was differential shrinkage between the plates.
  12. Hempel

    Old viola

    One has to wonder why LOB of fiddles get measured and remains stable over time. The 0.01% longitudinal movement coefficient figure given earlier is for "green" wood. In contrast, the radial (cross grain) movement coefficient of seasoned maple is around 4.5%. There's no way the corners would have moved lengthwise in such a significant manner, even if the fiddle took an extended swim in the ocean like the Red Diamond. And since no wood was added or subtracted that would have resulted in a length change in the plates, the "taken to bits" argument holds no water either.
  13. Hempel

    Old viola

    The "shrinkage/taken to bits argument" is bullshit, because there would be (mostly) uniform shrinkage on both the bass and treble sides (across the grain). If "shrinkage/taken to bits" was the proper explanation you'd expect the bass and treble sides to exhibit similar corner displacement, but they do not. That said, I do agree with you that BOB ribs would be mitered differently at the corner.
  14. Hempel

    Old viola

    Even a woodworking acolyte can tell you that wood shrinkage is minimal longitudinally (0.01%!) along the grain vs across the grain. So you better explain how the top corner got longitudinally displaced so much from the lower corner due to "shrinkage."
  15. Hempel

    Old viola

    Perhaps the OP can furnish us with a photo sighting straight down the bass side, from the endpin to the scroll. I'm reasonably certain that such a view will show wonky alignment between the upper and lower bouts. I have difficulty thinking the use of an internal mold would have resulted in such wonky rib alignment.
  16. Hempel

    Old viola

    The lines aren't anywhere close to parallel:
  17. Hempel

    Old viola

    I'm confused. The out of square corners, especially noticable from the bass side view, indicates built on the back construction. Excluding Füssen and perhaps "rural," doesn't this indicate the viola would not have originated from South Germany or Austria?
  18. Hempel

    Violin Id

    Let's just say I'd be careful and avoid using Tarisio photo archive as indisputable reference material.
  19. Hempel

    Violin Id

    There's little doubt that the fiddle on the right looks like a twin of the fiddle on the left. What's the original source for photos of the putative Jombar fiddle on the left? But we have to be extremely careful here. Jombar previously had a shop on 20 Rue de Rochechouart, which is actually closer to where Valot resided. From Valot's marriage we know he resided at Rue Fbg. Poissonniere in 1920 but he could have resided there earlier. (unfortunately no Paris census available prior to 1926) In any case, there's no doubt in my mind that Valot had ample opportunity to pick up fiddles from any of the violin makers right next to the Conservatoire de Paris (not just on Rue Fbg. Poissonniere.) I don't even doubt Valot may have been Jombar's customer. My understanding was E. L'Humbert may have been supplying fiddles to Jombar even prior to 1921. In fact even L'Humbert lived in the Conservatoire neighborhood at a point in time.
  20. Hempel

    Violin Id

    Given all this information that has now been uncovered, I have to wonder why Valot had to resort to making his own label. I will begin by stating that the Valots apparently had no children and were sufficiently well off to afford their own live-in housekeeper. If we take the label at face value, why didn't Valot go to Lucien L'Humbert to get a replacement label and any required repair work done c. 1934? I'm also having a bit of trouble believing that a bookkeeper turned amateur painter would have any wood finishing experience. Frédéric Boyer was a pupil of Charles Enel. E. L'Humbert and Enel were apparently close. So I suppose FB was in a good position to know where exactly Jombar's instruments from 1921 to 1926 came from. It would be interesting to find out if Serge Boyer shares his father's assessment regarding Jombar.
  21. The grandaddy of such shows is BBC's "Antiques Roadshow," which has aired since 1979. You can tell the Germans are new to this since one of the examiners didn't know the label is supposed to be on the bass side of the fiddle.
  22. Hempel

    Violin Id

    Yes, I was waiting to see who would catch on to the fact that Georges Valot, at the time of his marriage, lived on the same street close to a number of established violin shops on Rue du Faubourg Poissonniere.
  23. Hempel

    Violin Id

    Jean Francois Georges Valot was born on 7/19/1865 in Paris. On 4/10/1920 he married Louise Aubrun. Witnesses were Marie Terver née Souchard and Maria Chabernaud née Plard. Valot lived at 136 Faubourg Poissonniere. Witnesses lived 86 Rue Faubourg Saint Denis and 10 Rue de Valenciennes respectively. Valot's signature: 34 Rue de Passy (16eme Arron.) where E. L'Humbert had his shop, was about 8km away. Mme. M. V. L'Humbert was still alive at the time of her husband's death so any theories on disposal of the estate must be taken with a grain of salt.
  24. Hempel

    Violin Id

    I don't think this materially changes anything, but here's more info on Georges Valot. No connection with the trade uncovered so far. Georges Jean Valot was born in Paris 1865. His wife Louise was born Charroux 1873. It was already obvious that he was an amateur artist but the census listing confirms it. He was alive as late as 1945, still a member of L'Union des Artistes.
  25. IIRC, Berggren moved from Worcester to Malden just before 1903. While in Malden he had three addresses. And as we know his daughter Ebba died of TB in 1904. Berggren himself would come down with TB by 1908. Between the moving instability and disease I have a difficult time understanding how he might have carved out a back, never mind make a fiddle. Berggren stay in Worcester was longer than that in Malden, and there was only evidence of two addresses in Worcester. That's not to say you don't have a point about Malden and its proximity to Boston. Having lived in Cambridge myself I'm well aware Worcester isn't considered part of the greater Boston area. I'm curious who you think might have influenced Berggren and Henning, as well as Llewellen Rhines (car mechanic by trade). They all got similar ideas regarding the wonky corners from somewhere, and I don't think it was from Ira White. I will also point out that Henning was most likely (immigration) sponsored by another Swedish immigrant who also worked at the Chickering piano factory. His sponsor appears as a witness on his naturalization application. So I don't think Henning would have had the opportunity to learn violin making before 1905 while he was at the piano factory. Henning hung his own shingle in 1905, and split his time between carpentry and learning violin making, on his own time. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chickering_%26_Sons#/media/File:1895_Chickering_factory_TremontSt_Boston.png
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