MatthewThomas

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About MatthewThomas

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  1. Duane, In what little I have read about Count Cozio I took his role as more of a connoisseur, potentially the first violin aficionado. I didn't get the feeling that he was particularly business-oriented due to his station in life. They have his Carteggio at the library. I will try to view that one too. Vuillaume is such a different character. I am certain he would have been interesting to know, but I think he viewed existence with a much wider grey area than most people do. I wasn't aware that A. Gagliano had been 100% established as a non-Amati/Stradivari pupil. Has the riddle of his apprenticeship been solved?
  2. Mr. Carlson, Thanks for the thought! Found it 20 miles away. Now if only they had some violins to look at there... They do! Now that's a library.
  3. Duane88, I don't understand why G.B. conveying it to Cozio isn't considered to have more weight. Cozio certainly knew plenty of other people in the violin world. I would expect that someone along the way would have pointed out to him that Lorenzo wasn't a maker. G.B. and Cozio had a falling out. I don't expect that Cozio would perpetuate that lie IF G.B was bold enough to create the mythology. I would think that the label swap would have occurred the other way around if Lorenzo made violins and they had any resemblance to G.B.'s. If a Stainer was worth 80 - 100, a Stradivarius worth 50-60, a G.B. 20 - 30, a Lorenzo wouldn't have been worth more than 10 (can't remember the currency, I think the numbers I guessmembered are from The Social History...). I would expect a Lorenzo to be relabeled as a G.B. in the ensuing 300 years. I would expect them to be relabeled as anything other than Lorenzo to increase their value in the last 300 years. Paolo was familiar with G.B. and comfortable enough with him as the intermediary for all the shop bits. That says a lot to me. The innkeeper as a profession is interesting. I would be curious as to how busy an innkeeper in Piacenza would be year round. He would have space and free time as opposed to if he were farming a 20 - 100 acre farm.
  4. Mr. Burgess, I would only play the violin partially naked in front of a courthouse. Mr. Holmes, Sometimes people write [redacted] and they just be so wordy and so self-absorbed. I am not a fan of books. I would never want a book's autograph. I am a proud non-reader of books. - Kanye Bothered isn't the right word. $400 is a pretty steep entrance price and I am pretty sure that I don't know anyone who has a copy.
  5. My only problem with this debate is that the "new" version is more contentious than the previously accepted version. With all due respect, I mean that sincerely, for G.B. to have to be moved into the category of "pathological liar" in order to be discredited is somewhat absurd. As everyone here attests he was at the pinnacle of his profession. He didn't have a need for his father to be elevated to maker for his work to be accepted as excellent. If he said his father made violins, his father probably made violins. I don't have a problem if G.B. said he was born in Cremona or Piacenza. He wouldn't remember, his parents would. I was born 15 miles outside a city and went to school in that city. No one has heard of my hometown. When anyone asks where I was born or grew up, I just reference the nearby city. If there is an after-life and Lorenzo made violins and is reading this thread. He's annoyed. All of the resources I have stumbled upon list Lorenzo as being born in 1694/95. He was born around 1680. If you are looking for him you need to start there.
  6. I have a delicious unlabeled Schoenbach (maybe I need to post pics of that one to get 100% confirmation) and a couple of lilting and labeled Czech violins. This violin doesn't look like it was made on the same planet as them.
  7. Thanks for all the replies particularly palousian for kicking it off. This forum is awesome. It is funny, because the responses regarding aesthetics are so distant from my own opinion. I printed a picture of the back and placed it on my desk and find myself staring at it often. Flipping pictures of it up here almost feels like I am showing pictures of me lady and everyone collectively gasping in horror. If anyone else straggles through to comment, could you confirm that it is not sacrilegious for me to take the top off when it is in my hands and perform the belly repair myself (i.e. not harming something that should be left to better hands). I am relatively competent, but not a luthier (although I do own the Johnson and Courtnall book and will be bidding on Mr. Hargrave's note-filled Sacconni when he decides to sell it on eBay) and know my limits. Can someone tell me what is going on with the button? Did someone hammer nails through it into the block?
  8. The back looks like a lot of furniture I have seen and I find it very attractive.
  9. Are you referring to the belly and the back or just the belly? Looking at the back, I would say that it hasn't been touched. The belly, could have been, but may have been done that way (or later retouched) to match the back closely. I t would have been odd to have an orange yellow belly on such a dark back. I was wondering if the back was done with the horse digestion product varnish that Mr. Hargrave references in his Double Bass thread.
  10. Thanks for the responses! By "Füssen Diaspora" I meant someone who apprenticed in or was trained by someone who apprenticed in Füssen. Could be a Füssen Proper violin (?). I was wondering if the top had been French polished. The chinrest area has horizontal micro-abrasions (cross-grain) that could have been caused by a beard. The pegbox walls are ridiculously thin (2 - 3mm thick in areas). Why would someone do that?
  11. Another question, it doesn't appear that it has any belly repairs or back repairs (it needs some belly repairs). Does it look like the top has ever been off before? The button looks a bit messy and I can't figure out what is going on there.
  12. MatthewThomas

    Writing

    Yes. Why did you put a new neck on? In Post #10 is the first picture old neck and the second picture new neck? If yes to the succession of old pic/ new pic, I am wondering why the scroll/neck graft as they are the from the same continuous piece of wood (grain is a perfect match). Graft to make it seem older?
  13. MatthewThomas

    Writing

    Not sure if it is just your photo, but the neck looks recent. Old scroll, new neck? I didn't look back at the old links Rue posted thoroughly, but I would assume all the answers are there.
  14. MatthewThomas

    Writing

    The corners on the one Rue posted look Mittenwald-ish. If your corners look the same, it would be Mittenwald-ish too!
  15. MatthewThomas

    Writing

    Grand Imperial Russia Catherine II Roman Montagna in Cremona 1741 I am making an assumption on the rom for Roman. Montagna was based out of Venice, so not sure about the Cremona connection. Catherine II was coronated in 1762 (known as Catherine the Great now and probably post 1762). Montagna died in 1750. The dates sort of line up. She would have been 12 in 1741.