finnfinnviolin

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About finnfinnviolin

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  1. I have had great results with Georgia pine. I have cooked both light varnishes, and very dark. I particularly like how it reacts when removing varnish for antiquing. The same company also make fantastic turpentine
  2. I actually have one of these, but never got on with it after using one of those fancy French Arno ones I realized that a smaller radius was a huge advantage. If you you really want to buy a fantastic burnisher, then this for me is the Rolls Royce. https://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/arno-burnisher-the-one-true-no-fail-burnisher/
  3. This is so true, if you use something with a small radius it takes very little pressure to create a fine cutting edge.
  4. Nice scraper! Where did you get that? Nice and thick, would do an excellent job of preparing peg hole bushings for retouch.
  5. As far as technique for creating a bur, I only use the really hard pressure when the scraper is sat face down on the bench. The turning of the ends is done with very light pressure so there is little risk. I also put a concave bend in the steel with my thumb whilst I turn the edge, meaning that when it’s released the burr is under tension. If that makes sense?
  6. Well whatever it is, it works really well! Not serated but You do have to smooth out the edges otherwise it is a little rough.
  7. yes, that can work. But having something really really hard like tungsten carbide really does make the difference. In my opinion
  8. definitely not pretty! But it is Tungsten Carbide.
  9. Hi everyone, Just wanted to show people these little carbide burnishers. I think they are made for sharpening garden tools. At $6 its an absolute winner! The corners are a little sharp when you first get it, but if you round them slightly with some 600grit wet and dry its fantastic burnisher! easily as good as the fancy french ones. $6- home depot.