uguntde

Members
  • Content Count

    345
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Posts posted by uguntde

  1. On 09/03/2018 at 4:32 PM, sospiri said:

    I don't think that craquel is intentional, and I don't like it.  It's the only part of the violin I don't like the look of.

    Did they use less shellac and more gum in that technique to give a better sound than with the mostly shellac method?

    The op's violin is in very good conditon, would that be a tough varnish? I can see it hasn't been played much.

     

    To get some craquel they would have used 25-30% shellac. On this fiddle it probably is a mix of craquel and sweat.

  2. 1 hour ago, sospiri said:

    Did Charles Bailly pick the nicest ones he could find from all over France?

    I don't know. I misunderstood your response:

      But I found this one on your website

    5020chipot-violin-label1.jpg

    Is this oil varnish or shellac?

    endbutton.JPG

    This is a spirit varnish, but not just shellac. They used a mix of tree rosins (gum elemi, gum mastic, hum benzoin, venetian turp, ...) mixed with 20-25% of shellac shellac that gives a nice craquel. Most of the 20th centure French makers used spirit varnishes, and the same for many of the Italians (Oddone, Fagnola). If you really want to know, used some alcohol to test, carefully though.

    An oil varnish will actually polymerise and turn very hard, spirit varnishes can stay very soft.

     

  3. Nice wood, front and back, I personally really like French workmanship, red varnish with a yellow ground. For me this would be an excellent trade instrument if it sounds. Leon Bernardel are usually somewhat more expensive than JTL often for no good reason.

    A proper Bernardel is of course preferable, and in a different price range, but many don't like the style and sound of those (Gand & Bernardel) instruments either. Colorful spirit varnishes are now not so much in fashion.

     

  4. 19 hours ago, Ratcliffiddles said:

    Certainly English not far from Peter Wamsley or follower, with a new head. ffs not quite  Wamsley, Are the ribs unusually high?

    Thanks, I think you are really close. The scroll until 9, almost without chamfer, round button, even the f holes are not far away.

  5. 8 hours ago, ClefLover said:

    My son just said, “dad, you’re an idiot.  That looks like nothing like a Didier cello.”  He’s right.  

    It can't be French. But thanks anyway.

  6. Can you help me to identify what this cello is.  Scratched in purfling, blocked and lined. Rather nice scroll, too nice for a cheap German. It might be English. The f-holes and varnish might go with Forster school, certainly not the scroll. Lockey Hill scratched in purfling but is scrolls are quite different.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    received_10160042254635383.jpeg

    received_10160042255290383.jpeg

    received_10160042257515383.jpeg

    received_10160042261365383.jpeg

    received_10160042277605383.jpeg

    received_10160042278395383.jpeg

    received_10160042250505383.jpeg

    received_10160042251445383.jpeg

    received_10160042252245383.jpeg

    received_10160042253445383.jpeg

    received_10160042245565383.jpeg

    received_10160042246535383.jpeg

    received_10160042247960383.jpeg

    received_10160042248295383.jpeg

    received_10159952202690383.jpeg

    received_10160042242550383.jpeg

    received_10160042243340383.jpeg

    received_10160042245005383.jpeg

    received_10160042246535383(2).jpeg

    received_10160042246535383(2).jpeg

    received_10160042254635383.jpeg

    received_10160042255290383.jpeg

    received_10160042257515383.jpeg

    received_10160042261365383.jpeg

    received_10160042277605383.jpeg

    received_10160042278395383.jpeg

    received_10160042250505383.jpeg

    received_10160042251445383.jpeg

    received_10160042252245383.jpeg

    received_10160042253445383.jpeg

    received_10160042245565383.jpeg

    received_10160042246535383.jpeg

    received_10160042247960383.jpeg

    received_10160042248295383.jpeg

    received_10159952202690383.jpeg

    received_10160042242550383.jpeg

    received_10160042243340383.jpeg

    received_10160042245005383.jpeg

  7. 10 hours ago, martin swan said:

    To be honest will all this kind of stuff the pricing seems to relate more to the spurious name on the label than the quality of the instrument. Every violin shop these days seems to have a "special relationship" with some spurious Budapest maker or otherwise unknown luthier, but these generally seem to be no more than brand names for factory instruments bought in the white by the bag-load.

    In general I think people would be much better off buying a Jay Haide.

    I agree

  8. Just now, martin swan said:

    I agree - the wood is quite plain for a Chinese instrument, and the workmanship and varnish likewise.

    But it's a trade instrument of some sort. I wonder if it isn't a Bubenreuth kit. i've come across a few things like this where an amateur luthier has made something out of parts, glued it all together, varnished it after a fashion and produced a label.

    So in this case the seller would not be committing any kind of fraud by selling it as an "Alan Charles", just over-pricing it by around 100%. If the seller isn't that knowledgeable about instruments, it could be an honest mistake.

    I think it is an honest mistale, just in case someone googles the dealer. They are not dishonest.

    I agree that Bubenreuth is more likely than Chinese. The difference is mainly in the finish as a modern Bubenreuth kit may also be imported from China in the white.

  9. The dealer thinks it is an English instrument, it is being sold on comission. A friend who has it on approval showed this to me and asked for some advice. It is well-built and sounds good, but the price is too high.

    It seems that in the violin trade almost anything goes these days.

  10. There is a cello on sale by a Alan Charles (1994), made in England. I can't find any maker with this name and I am increasingly convinced it is Chinese, probably imported in the white, varnished with shellac varnish, somewhere in Europe.

    The label bright white paper with some logo, Alan Charles written by pencil.

    What are your thoughts?  

    Cello Alan Charles Back SCROLL.jpg

    Cello Alan Charles FR SCROLL.jpg

    Cello Alan Charles L Scroll.jpg

    Cello Alan CharlesBack Det.jpg

    Cello Alan CharlesDET FR.jpg

    Cello Alan Charles BACK.jpg

    Cello Alan Charles FRONT.jpg

  11. On 02/01/2018 at 2:13 PM, jacobsaunders said:

    The Fuchs Taxe is a book, now in it's 17th. Edition which lists the realistic retail price of many violin/bow makers, in the opinion of a committee of experts. You can (and often will) disagree with it, but it is sometimes a useful second opinion,

    http://www.holfter.com/Shop/main_bigware_3.php?search_in_description=1&keywords=Fuchs+Taxe&bigwareCsid=a22e6bceb190984c8dea76659b629ab3&x=6&y=11

    PS. I am the last to criticise spelling, just I found "puke violin and viola" funny

    Last edition is more than ten years old. I read somewhere that Koestler, Guillaume, Grünke and I think Eckstein are working on a new version.

  12. I agree that the attribution to Buchstetter is not convincing, at least not compared to all the other Buchstetter violins. One would need more examples of that early Buchstetter model. The label also was not Buchstetter. How Schröder got the idea of Buchstetter I do not know.

    What speaks against an early Buchstetter is that it is very refined work.  Rainer Leonhardt described the inside as typical for Klotz school:

    "Ja es handelt sich um eine sehr frühe Buchstetter.
    Die Klotz Form deutet auch auf Innenform hin habe aber keine Bilder von innen,
    der Gegenschwung ist auch bei dieser Geige vorhanden."

    One of these instruments that will probably never be identified with any degree of certainty.

  13. 3 hours ago, Blank face said:

    This is IMO a highly interesting somehow unusual violin, but I can't imagine, too, that it has something to do with what we kow as Buchstetter - except that it's a sort of unknown "Frühwerk"?

    See you next Year!

    It made it around the world with this attribution and is now on sale as Buchstetter in Japan: http://www.tatsunoya.co.jp/instruments/1154/

    When I communicated with Rainer Leonhardt he took the view that it is a very early Buchstetter, and I assume that this was Schröder's opinion, too. I would certainly take their view seriously. 

  14. 1 hour ago, jacobsaunders said:

    You seem to have got things mixed up. I can’t imagine for a second that Ben Schröder ascribed that to Buchstetter.

    I have a copy of the Certificate with picture of the instrument but not sure I can post this here as it was not on Leonhardt's web page. The reason I didn't buy it was simply that I was also not convinced. 

  15. Leonhardt in Mittenwald had a violin described as Buchstetter for sale 2-3 years ago which I played and considered to buy for a while. It was on their web page for a long time despite a relatively low asking price. It had a beautiful and powerful tone and I often regret not having bought this instrument.

    I kept pictures from their web page which I attach below. Regarding authenticity it had a Schröder certificate, and a wrong label (Florinus Guidantus). I believed Schröder's certificate, but the other pictures of Buchstetter violins that I have never show a plain back.

    buchstetter_gabr_55539d64c9f80.jpg

    buchstetter-1-img_7634.jpg

    buchstetter-2-img_7620.jpg

    buchstetter-5-img_7637.jpg

    id-2-jpg55539d8e6d73b.jpg

    id-1-jpg55539d84c0aef.jpg

  16. 4 hours ago, hungrycanine said:

    Thanks for all these helpful replies. The original ad that VDA ferreted out is from a local site in Victoria, BC, where folks hope to sell unwanted dog kennels, out-grown hockey skates, and occasional musical instruments to local buyers. It is not at all an EBay sort of place, where sellers are expecting or willing to prepare items for shipping. The seller seems to be a very straightforward and honest fellow, and a pretty good fiddler, but not much interested in the pedigrees of instruments. The price seems very good for a decently built fiddle that, as John_London says, is setup and ready to go -- in fact, the seller says he's been playing it for 20 years and someone gave it to him when it first came into his possession. I guess what I need to decide is whether I need yet ANOTHER trade fiddle! It doesn't seem likely though, from the discussion here, that the instrument pre-dates 1931, but it does seem likely that it has been around for a while and has been well cared for. Thanks again for the help.   :)

    For $270 you can't do much wrong if it sounds OK. The priceis just do low. Just don't expect too muchin authenticity.

  17. First, I like it, it looks really nice, I like the edgework, the way the purfling is done. Most super-wide-grained violins I have seen had a very soft sound.

    I think this violin is brand new, made by a maker who copied something very specific. The pegs fit exactly, there are no 'real' marks or scratches.  It may have a neck graft, hard to see, but I know makers who would do this on a new instrument.

    Can I ask where you picked it up? They may have an idea where it is from.

  18. This weekend I saw an interesting violin and wonder whether you think it is genuine. It is stamped 'Young Aberdeen', and could very well be from this maker. It has a very low neck angle which probably needs to be changed but is otherwise in good condition and has a nice tone. Auction values don't seem to be very high, but there are not many examples. Has anyone seen his work before?

    20171202_143638.jpg

    20171202_143649.jpg

    20171202_143649.jpg

    20171202_143654.jpg

    20171202_143705.jpg

    20171202_143717.jpg

    20171202_144037.jpg

    20171202_144204.jpg

    20171202_144210.jpg

    20171202_144219.jpg

    20171202_144223.jpg