uguntde

Members
  • Content count

    222
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by uguntde

  1. uguntde

    n+1 illegible bow brand

    He told me that he occasionally stamps a Paris. A bit too soft mine too, but excellent in tone. Brompton had a reserve of £1000. When he sold them in his workshop years ago he asked more than that.
  2. uguntde

    n+1 illegible bow brand

    I know Jacques and Monique Poullot as bow makers near Chamonix in the French alps. Some of Jacques Poullot's bows are stamped Poullot a Paris. He seems to be in Dijon now. Brompton had one recently which was in my humble opinion a good bow but did not sell. Here is a typical Jacques Poullot violin bow, its authenticity has been confirmed by the maker. Same style frog as the one shown above. All Poullot bows are numbered, this one is 9528. Without the number it is not genuine.
  3. uguntde

    To bid or not to bid?

    This is actually not Birdseye maple, it is a type of maple that grows in Asia. I don't know what it is called. I think it loks awful.
  4. uguntde

    Perry Violin?

    This is a Perry I recently saw and played. Much better work than the violin shown above. It also had a good tone.
  5. uguntde

    What could it be?

    A very beautiful one piece back, with two pins at the bottom. Long slim f-holes which could be French. Ribs cut too short,filled in with ebony, almost unfigured. Very difficult to identify. Could we see the epurfling in the corners? Where is the purfling joined together? How are the f-holes cut? Were the plate corners rounded after or before they were glued?
  6. uguntde

    Edward Herron-Allen ebook...

    Has anyone ever seen a Herron-Allen violin?
  7. uguntde

    Makers Survey, one-piece fronts grain orientation

    Certainly not. But has anyone tried it the other way round?
  8. uguntde

    Makers Survey, one-piece fronts grain orientation

    I have two old violins with one piece fronts (and backs), a Kloz and a Duke, both genuine and with a good sound. Both have the wider grain on the bass side.
  9. uguntde

    Speaking of strings

    Somewhat higher for violins: http://www.warchal.com/tension_chart_violin.html For viola they report them all as the same: http://www.warchal.com/tension_chart_viola.html
  10. uguntde

    Speaking of strings

    I tried the two on the viola and they are very similar, but different to the Karneol, the latter is somewhat softer in tone. They all have the same string tension. Between Brilliant and Amber I find not much difference. They are both good strings. Same for Amber vs Karneol on the violin where I haven't tried Brilliant. The Amber is excellent. I personally prefer their timbre to Evah-s, you get more warmth in the tone. I also find the Evah-s are very poignant in the beginning, but mellow down soon, ending up closer to Dominants. The Warchals change a little in the first few days and then maintain their timbre for a long time.
  11. uguntde

    The Value of a Violin as Art versus as a Tool

    You answered my point well, you take measurements at several levels along the grain. I assume your optical software pull out distances between grain lines that you then correlate with the reference data, or is the correlation done on original scans or pictures? I assume there is no reginoal data with Europe? Do you use any oft the publicly available softwares availabe or linked on http://web.utk.edu/~grissino/software.htm What I wondered was whether you use databases for different regions in Europe, for example The International Tree-Ring Data Bank seems to have regionally differentiated maps.
  12. uguntde

    The Value of a Violin as Art versus as a Tool

    For dendrochronological assessments, do you take photographs of the front of a violin or do you somehow scan the surface of the wood. How do you correct for the curvature arising from the arching, in particular for instruments with a high arching? I assume you use different locations on the plate for statistics - otherwise I can't imagine how you would do a t-test. Also, don't you use reference data for different regions of Europe, and with this make an assumption of where the instrument (or its wood) comes from?
  13. uguntde

    Iron Rosinate

    I don't think 3 carboxylic acids will yield a stable octagonal iron complex, the oxygens are too close. There is probably no proof for a rosinate metal ion coordination complex. In other words this is just the stoichiometric figure for some kind of a salt.
  14. uguntde

    Iron Rosinate

    You may be right, this was Michelman's idea, as rosin is mainly abietic acid. But considering that this is probably a very weak acid one may need a large excess of KOH. Michelman reports that he needs an 'acid number' of 160 to 170, I assume he refers to the excess of KOH needed. Fe(III) in FeCl3 is already Fe(H2O)6Cl3, a relatively stable complex, which is probably perfectly happy at high pH. Too much heating would convert this into ferric oxides which might precipitate. An iron(III) complex with abietic acid itself is unlikely, as it would not act as a complex or chelating agent. This might change if the double bond was hydrated, but this requires a metal catalyst, usually Pd (unlikely Fe would do the job). It would be worthwhile to dertermine the state of iron in these varnishes.
  15. uguntde

    c1800 Mittenwald with Whalebone purfling?

    Isn't this shape of scroll and the purfling quite typical for Jacbos? AN example of Jacobs work althou in b/w is found here: http://www.thestrad.com/gallery/from-the-archive-a-violin-by-hendrik-jacobs-1704-4/
  16. uguntde

    Iron Rosinate

    So your rosinate part is at very high pH. The iron chloride was probably yellow, and turned into a nice red brown in solution with the rosin at high pH. I assume you never neutralised the potassium hydroxide. I assume that Fe(III) probably undergoes a complexation with the rosin and such complexes are very stable. Michelman showed by simple stoichiometric analysis that such complexes are formed. Their stability may be pH dependent. If this was the case you would see a change by adding some acid to neutralise the potassium hydroxide. I wonder whether the high pH varnish causes any problems for the wood. I though Michelman somehow neutralised the rosinate at some stage.
  17. I am getting increasingly interested in 17th and 18th century English violins. Some instruments of Duke have a fabulous sound and are built like Amatis. He seems to have influenced others. Here is a London violin which is possibly what the label says, Charles and Samuel Thompson. It is reminiscent of Duke, although somewhat more tardy. Tarisio tells us that they sold on the work by other makers http://tarisio.com/cozio-archive/browse-the-archive/makers/maker/?Maker_ID=748. This one has some unfortunate and awful repairs to the scroll, probably after worm damage. Interesting features are a nice one piece front and back, one piece top and bottom ribs, interestingly chamfered linings, probably the original pegs, nice purfling and edgework. Do you think this fiddle is what it says it is? After it has been repaired, what do you think the value of such an instrument should be?
  18. uguntde

    Interesting 18th century English violin

    Thanks. Looks ike they were made by the same maker, same block, same style of lining, the nail.
  19. uguntde

    Interesting 18th century English violin

    Maybe a fake neck graft. Someone tried to work on the scroll and peg box, unfortunately.
  20. uguntde

    Interesting 18th century English violin

    The neck is nailed, yes. And the ribs that are one piece from C-bouts corner to C-bouts corner. Very nice work. The finger board was previously raised, and is now being replaced after a neck graft.
  21. uguntde

    European Sycamore vs American Maple

    Sychamore is just the English common name for maple. I have seen sychamore trees next to each other in England, one showing ripples, the next one not. This makes me think it is not a genetic feature. There is plenty of nice sychamore in England now. I see lots every time I walk through Green Park in London, all nicely figured as you can see from the ripples in the bark. The park web site however claims they are Acer saccharinum and they are not up for grabs.
  22. uguntde

    The Value of a Violin as Art versus as a Tool

    I remember a Guarneri with a Hamma certificate that didn't pass dendrochronology, and some instruments by the Foller brothers that were long believed to be genuine.
  23. An €800million concert hall will certainly be a driver for culture in Germany and beyond - well exemplified by the opening concert which included an Uraufführung by a piece by Wolfgang Rihm. Their first concert season is already sold out. Simon Rattle is trying to convince Britain to invest on a similar level in London, interesting to read the Guardian article with respect to this https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/jan/12/why-germany-is-proud-of-hamburg-elbphilharmonie-and-why-britain-should-care-about-that .
  24. uguntde

    Collin-Mezin cello?

    The signature is not bad, although not perfect. This is what it is to be. I have two 1888 at the moment. No cello though.
  25. uguntde

    Collin-Mezin cello?

    The maker is an excellent copyist, you need to give him credit fir this. Whoever gets this cello for below £2000 got an amazing deal if it sounds. If I was a maker, I would copy those, the Hels and the like, and not the Strads. I would certainly not put in new Chinese pegs to spoil it all in the end. It almost seems intentional.