uguntde

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Everything posted by uguntde

  1. uguntde

    Is there arising a crisis in the antique violins market ?

    It is of course a matter of taste. I heard Perlman once live in the Liederhalle in Stuttgart playing Brahms, and almost an hour worth of encores, and I listened to lots of his recordings. And I find his tone intriguing. I am not talking about projection, there is an edge to the tone of his violin, as if it was very rich in overtones. I hear this even now when he plays Schindler's list.
  2. uguntde

    Is there arising a crisis in the antique violins market ?

    Could you also send the aution link? Typically dealers add at least 100%. But they also risk sitting on the violin for a few years.
  3. uguntde

    Is there arising a crisis in the antique violins market ?

    If there is one Strad that I really think outperforms everything else in sound characteristics, it is the soil, at least in Perlman's hands. Why Menuhin sold it nobody knows. Maybe he got bored and liked another.
  4. uguntde

    UV Analysis of Varnish "Systems"

    You may have missed that I asked earlier about the content of the book further up and someone posted links to 3 articles, two of them in scientific journals. I made a statement about these articles that were quoted earlier and about what was stated in this forum (not sure what else you meant). Sorry, but in science work that has not stood up to critical peer review counts nothing. This is how a huge scientific community has operated well for decades. There is lots of non-scientific material with some value, but rigorous review definitely helps to improve quality. I assume that Greiner has done some systematic work, but so far I can't see what he has discovered, and he may not want to tell us because he wants to sell violins and books. I assume he studied UV images simlpy to see whether he can achieve the same fluorescent effects that are seen in Stradivari's varnishes using his own concoction.
  5. uguntde

    UV Analysis of Varnish "Systems"

    I don't have the book, only the summary posted above. Greiner is very smart and has probably worked with scientists who know what they are doing. But nothing is published in scientiic journals (peer reviewed). Can you give a hint of what the book says regarding assigbment of UV spectra or interpretation of UV spectra?
  6. uguntde

    UV Analysis of Varnish "Systems"

    Yes I am a scientist and I have no problem saying who I am, it seems that I left this out of my profile which I opened when I looked for some violin ID (my name is Ulrich Guenther). I guess, I skipped this because the violin world is leasure time enjoyment for me, but I now added my out of date University web to my profile. I am obviously interesed in NMR, and helped build the UK NMR facility in Birmingham since 2004. I do NMR mainly in a biomedical context. Violin varnishes would be material science of which I know not so much but would be quite interested to try. My interest in violins is a hobby, inspired by a remakable lady (whose name was Else Göhrum) about who few people now know, but who was a Flesch pupil and got me interested in violin playing, when I was a Chemistry PhD student in Tübingen. She also designed many new instruments when she was fobidden to play during the Nazi regime in Germany. With this she influenced my taste in tone and music massively, although I have developed since. One aspect of this is that she played a Strad for many years (unfortunately I don't know which one) which she never liked, but said it was much better after it was repared by Hamma. I am lucky to have a number of nice old and new instruments, I select very carefully what I buy. Reparied bows are included when the repair is exquisitly nice. I also play the violin, and now more viola than violin. I have seen many instruments as I travel to London for auctions and have friends who collect. When I have time I take a lesson from a CBSO violist and I play in an amatuer orchestra in Worcestershire where someone recently told me she knew Jacob Saunders (who I have never met in person) from school. And I met Martin socially before he became the UK's most inspiring violin dealer who can play and judge. When I walked into a violin shop in Italy many years ago I saw facsimiles of (old) varnish recipes which get me going to try my own. I have made many and some are very nice, which I pass on to a local violin maker. I travel a lot profesionally and usually visit the violin makers whereever I am. I am always polite, although I like some more than others. Now you have 20% of my life history, I guess I am an old man with and old man's hobby which a friend once called wooden toys, Holzspielzeug.
  7. uguntde

    My Linarol viola

    What did you like about Linarol's design? It is not what other people would copy. I guess the Storioni is also one you made. I like violins and violas that are not Strad and Guarneri copies. I am not sure I would have tried Linarol. These f-holes are definitely on the ugly side.
  8. uguntde

    Could this be Strnad?

    One of the best sounding violins I have ever heard was a Strnad, played by a LSO violinist - at least this is what he thought it was. Strnad's scroll is very narrow from button to button compared to Kloz family, edges seem to be more rasied. The varnish completely different to what is shown above.
  9. uguntde

    UV Analysis of Varnish "Systems"

    They talk about IR and GCMS, but not about UV. Forgive me, but to say 'shellac turns our pink' is like saying 'the violin seems to be made of wood'. UV spectra are really hard to interpret and it only makes sense if one knows what to look for. IR (includes FTIR) gives you infromation about vibrations and rotations in molecules. This is what the police uses when they find a reasonably pure white powder. For mixtures it is rubbish. UV and fluorescence tells us about the electronic structure: double bonds, conjugated double bonds, metals. Polymerisation of oil varnish reduces conjugated double bonds by Diels-Alder cross-linking. SO will potentially change something but hard to assign what causes the change. Age will, as the polymer structure changes. GCMS is great for small compounds, unpolymerised, linseed oil, abietic acid (rosin), maybe even shellac (thats a mixture of many things). The only systematic method that would lead further is solid state NMR, comparing new and old varnish samples. Only recently it has been possible to work with tiny samples. But even those are hard to come by. If you have a Strad and are willing to scratch of a few mg, please let me know. I am an analytical chemist and would be happy to engage in a project.
  10. uguntde

    UV Analysis of Varnish "Systems"

    I am a fan of nice spirit varnishes altogether. Many of the 20th century Italians used it, Oddone, Ganola, Bisiach and m any others. The Vettory family has a nice spirit varnish, their violins look really nice. It is more elastic, not as chippy as oil varnish. Spirit varnishes are much harder to apply though, and one needs a good recipe, but it is all just mixing tree resins and shellac.
  11. uguntde

    loss of value in bow after spline

    A violin does not loose value from a neck graft, bushed pegs, repairs to the edge etc, and the older it is, the less from a sound post patch. I have violins where little pieces of purfling have been replaced and the repairs are of such quality that nobody would consider lowering the value. I would not be astonished if good quality splines did not devalue bows at some point in the future, especially when done well using modern glues. These may not be collector items any more but still good bows for playing. This changes with market forces, and the current auction culture accelerates these markets.
  12. uguntde

    UV Analysis of Varnish "Systems"

    I don't have this book. What do they attibute the absorption to? Metals or conjugated double bonds?
  13. uguntde

    UV Analysis of Varnish "Systems"

    UV spectrometry is commonly used in chemistry and biochemistry. What you typically see is transitions in metals and conjugated organic systems (as you would have in fused varnishes, although particularly in the parts that have not polymerised). If Vuillaumes varnish absorbs UV light this may just mean that he used metal pigments. In fact, a spirit varnish consisting just of a mix of resins would not absorb UV except if some of the resins had lots of aromatic substances or conjugated bonds. On the other hand an unpolymerised oil varnish (abietic acid or linoleic acid) have the type of conjugated bonds that would absorb UV light. The method used for these pictures is crude. because the light was probbaly notmonochromatic (a fixed frequency or small frequency range). Modern UV spectrometers, and this could be implemented for photography, use a monochromator after a mercury lamp and sweep the frequency of the monochromator to see absorption frequencies. From such an approach one can certainly make some smart guesses of what is in the varnish. But I honestly think there are better methods. WIth modern solid state NMR you can look at tiny samples. a few milligrams of varnish and you can make some proper assignments. I thought occasinoally about applying for money to undertake such a study but the impact is too low to find a funder. Only the Wellcome Trust may pick something like this up.
  14. uguntde

    loss of value in bow after spline

    I am sorry, but I am not a 'dumpster surfer'. I also don't call you a dumster repairer becasue you have to deal with lots of cheap German factory violins. And I am also sufficiently stupid to buy a repaired bow for value or as a collectible. I bought this once to play and never regretted it. If it ever brakes again I had a cheap bow for a number years, so what. I also know quite a few players (even professional players in the UK, where salaries in the music industry are quite low) who went for a repaired instrument or bow to something that is good to play. I also know collectors with sizeable collections who include repaired bows. On the other side I really appreciate nice repairs, whether on violins or bows. And well-done splines are from a technical point of view not a good reason to reduce the value of a bow, especially in times of superglue, even though the market sees this differently at the moment. Lesser so for sound post patches, which are increasingly just accepted as almost inevitable on old instruments.
  15. uguntde

    loss of value in bow after spline

    Sorry, I had this wrong - it is Joseph Curtin who advertises soundpost veneers on his web page. https://josephcurtinstudios.com/instruments/bridge-and-post-veneers/
  16. uguntde

    loss of value in bow after spline

    I don't know. I have many bows, bought in different places, one of them I bought in a shop.
  17. uguntde

    loss of value in bow after spline

    I bought a gold mounted Nürnbergera few years ago with a good head spline repair. I still paid a fair amount at an auction (I forgot but between £1000 and 1200) - Martin knows the bow. I may have paid too much, but there were other bidders interested, and in the end that's what determines market value. Nürnbergers can of course not loose so much money as they are not as sought after as Sartories. Still, 10% would be more in the few hundred range. Although I have many bows, this continues to be my favourite violin bow and this amount of money is not really that much. If the repair is well done the head may be more stable than without the spline. I often wondered why bow makers don't add a spline with the grain rectangular in the first place, similar to what David Burgess does with his hardwood soundpost and bridge support patches. This could also be done in carbon fibre and we would not see as many broken heads.
  18. uguntde

    12-20K Viola Suggestions

    I play a modern viola with a warm powerful sound. But I realise that a lot of makers go for a rather nasal sound that you find in many older violas - I don't like these nasal instruments at all. Modern makers often know how to generate this fuller clearer sound. This is what people like Hiroshi Iizuka achieve with novel shapes, it is also what Tertis wanted, There may be a change in taste as the viola is just gradually being discovered in its full value. There seems to be a change in paradigma regarding the viola sound and there is no largely agreed sound quality that is to be achieved. One needs to choose what one wants. And for this you have to play lots.
  19. uguntde

    Violin I/D

    Does the ;abel read easily as Georg Christoph Meinel? A Klingenthal maker. It may well be original to the fiddle.
  20. uguntde

    English violin ID

    Interesting to read that Joseph Hill used this label more often: http://www.wrightviolins.com/joseph-hill/ I also didn't know that Richard Duke and Josph Hill lived next door to each other near High Holborn.
  21. uguntde

    English violin ID

    I presume with the title that the violin shown here is English. I assume it is from the aura of Richard Duke. I am pretty much convinced that it is all from the same hand, although the front and back purfling is not identical. It has a peculiar label which is largely illegible except for the last name (Hieronymus) and the year (there seem to be 4 names). It has had some very well done repairs including a neck graft, strangely with a very low neck angle, and it needs more work. Can anyone make sense out of this instrument? or the label?
  22. uguntde

    English violin ID

    Got the idea, thanks
  23. uguntde

    English violin ID

    What do mitred inside mould rib joints look like?
  24. uguntde

    English violin ID

    Thanks for ths advice. I don't have the violin with me but can look this up next week. I am adding a picture of the corner. What you describe as "built on the back construction with symmetrical corner blocks and rib joints, sometimes the ribs in a groove of the bottom" I have seen with some instruments, especially a Pamphillon owned by a friend. However, my Duke doesn't show this or I don't know how to identify it (how do I see when it is built on the bottom?). Considering that the bottom round holes of the f-holes are quite small it is hard to see the inside, it seemed that the lining is extemely narrow (3mm) and square shaped I added a few more pictures and can take a few more next week. The violin also needs to be opened and I will have more pictures from the inside in a few weeks.
  25. uguntde

    English violin ID

    Why I assume it is English: I am in England and we always go for English first if it could also be German :). But also: The purfling, max 3mm from the edge, very narrow linings. I have a Duke with exactly these features. But I know, Mittenwald is the other option, and a Duke scroll looks different. On the other hand it is also not the typical Kloz scroll (if you look at it from the back it is too broad towards the top, sideways widening continually where almost all Kloz scrolls have a distinct discontinuity).