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khunsakee

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  1. @Joseph posted a question (April, 1998) about a G.A.Fischer violin, with an Albert Fischer bow. More recently (March, 2018,) @Tiki O'Riley had questions about a G.A.F. violin, with a number inside, with a reply/question from about their, G.A.F. branded, Ficker ,instrument. Then, in December, 2020 @Manny considered buying a very expensive one, Today I noticed a G.A.Ficker violin, being offered on ebay: https://www.ebay.com/itm/203605122277?hash=item2f67cf9ce5:g:7ikAAOSwduhhQPo5 With the ebay offering, for the first time, I get to see a photo of the G.A. Ficker "G.A.F." brand. Now, I wonder, is this the same maker, using the same brand, to make instruments, using different labels, in order, to supply the same instrument to two different marketers? I have a Georg Albert Fischer violin that came with an Albert Fischer bow, similar to how @Joseph described his outfit. Mine is the only one I've seen, thus far, that is undated and has Mittenwald marked out. . ...and I noticed, while making this post, there seems to be a similar defect to the letter "G," on both brands.
  2. I used to have a real Skylark violin (1/2 sized.) It was made by the old man, himself, when he was making them in China.
  3. Thanks, I'll be sure to check with you first; next time.
  4. Whenever I create(or change) an ID/Password, I do it on a spreadsheet then, copy and paste to the website, to keep everything correct. But, when you've got a user ID/password and they request email address/password, it gets a little confusing. I was logged onto Tarisio but, was unable to logon to T2, when attempting to bid. I tried all combinations of Tarisio/T2 email/password and user ID/password. I assumed that, I was good to go, after they did the $1 bank account withdrawal thing. According to T2, it has been fixed. I'll just have to keep my fingers crossed.
  5. I hate it, when wrong but, I’m big enough of a man to admit it when that happens. I argued that my 1923 Ernst Heinrich Roth violin was a phony that, the label and brand were faked, added to deceive. After building up enough courage, I sent several, high detail, photos to the EHRoth firm and, even though, I included them with the photos, Mr. Roth did not address my five "...cons, to this being an authentic Roth..." this was his reply: I was wrong, I admit it, it is not a fake. I don’t understand why people hate eating crow, mine tastes delicious.
  6. Also, I just changed my password, I can now (still) login and, still cannot enter a bid.
  7. After I saw a post about, todays, upcoming T2 auction, I registered. I already had an account but, I updated it to include bidding on auction; or, so I thought. I just made several, unsuccessful, attempts to place a Proxy Bid on this violin https://t2-auctions.com/auctions/lot/?csid=2199502848&cpid=3741171712&filter_key= The seller lost out on the chance to sell for, up to, 152% more, had my bid been accepted, I hope they see this post. T2 has some questions to answer and/or some procedures to clarify and/or correct.
  8. First off, I'd like to apologize to @Violadamore, for supplying the links and quotes, to her. If I had enough Maestronet points and, been able to make more than 2 posts per day, perhaps the, obviously, RedBull induced, attack would have directly at me, the obvious target. I was only trying to ADD to the conversation. Apparently, some sort of very, very, raw nerve has been touched. Or, does Maestronet have a Fox, OANN or other equivalent outrage based, competitor forum some members are trying to audition, for? Reading the condensed history, from the family Roth, could leave anyone to believe that the events of moving to America and the founding of S&R were closer in time than they were. However, pointing out that, one may have misconstrued information has never, in my experience, provoked such a vile and uncalled for response. Such is life. Here is the, exact source (as I relayed to @Violadamore) of the, unmitigated bullshit, of my confusion: http://www.roth-violins.de/index_eng.htm "...Albert followed in his father`s footsteps as a violin-maker while Ernst Heinrich Roth II received a training in commercial life. In 1921 at the age of nineteen, her moved to America. Along with his friend Alban Scherl the company Roth and Scherl was founded. Thus Roth instruments and other products came on the North American market..." https://www.conn-selmer.com/en-us/our-brands/scherl-and-roth "...Heinrich Roth was a seventh-generation violin maker who worked with his father, Ernst Heinrich Roth, and his brother, Albert, in the family shop in Markneukirchen, Germany. During the early 20th century, the family had built a reputation for making fine string instruments and sold many to visiting Americans. In 1922, Heinrich was persuaded by his American customers and friends to come to the United States, bringing the experience and reputation of Roth instruments with him..." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernst_Heinrich_Roth "...Ernst Heinrich Roth had two sons: Gustav Albert and Ernst Heinrich II. Albert Roth learnt the luthier trade from his father. Ernst Heinrich Roth II, on the other hand, received a training in commerce and in 1921 settled in the United States, where he founded a trading company, Scherl & Roth. It is through this company that many Roth instruments, bows and other merchandise came onto the North American market, where quite a number of them, from different periods and of very uneven quality, can be found to this day..." https://www.ifshinviolins.com/Instruments/Detail/ProductName/ernst-heinrich-roth-16582 "...These fine violins were so popular in America that Ernst Heinrich sent his son Ernst Heinrich II (1890-1961) to this country to represent the firm..." Ernst Heinrich Roth - a rediscovered master "...Ernst Heinrich Roth's son Ernst Heinrich Roth II emigrated to the US in 1921 and became one of the leading instrument dealers in North America with his company, Scherl & Roth. His brother Gustav Albert Roth stayed in Germany, learned the art of violin making and took over the family business after their father died in 1948..." http://www.roth-violins.de/index_eng.htm Roth I's son, Ernst II, and Albert's son , Wilhelm, in front of portrait. Ernst II (photo) Albert (photo) Ernst I (painting) Roth I's father (photo) ?? (photo) Albert's son (standing) Ernst II (standing)
  9. These repairs make me feel like a savant. I have always loved the beauty of wood and, was reasonably adept at woodworking. Then, I fell in love with the beauty of the luthiers art and thought, "Hey, I'd like to do that." So, In 2010, I was practicing on a, throw away 3/4 violin top. I took out the integral bass bar, put in a new one, did what I thought was an acceptable sound post patch(about 2 weeks later learned how sound post patches should be done,) threw in some patches(?) for the blocks and wing-crack, some tiny, tiny, cleats(from old cedar shingles), extracted and applied a solution from amber pea gravel, and learned that I'd never, ever, be able to do any actual repairs, without in-person instruction. A few years later, sudden-onset hearing loss accompanied by tinnitus, dashed any thoughts of a second career of instrument repair. You can't fix a musical instrument with 3 or 4 different ring tones playing, constantly, in your head. Until, I saw the photos, above, I was too ashamed to show anyone what I had done:
  10. This is great! It clearly has a rectangular MOP slide and, so, adds a sub-category to the Type-1 designation to my hypothesis. It leads me to believe that, either, the rectangles are later or, were used on the bows with less than two stars. Not that I'm obsessive but, I've added them to my list. Thnx!
  11. The one mark "German," do you recall what the MOP looked like? i know that's not an important detail but, I'm trying, probably in vane, to narrow down time frames and, any in details (like "GERMANY" stamped/branded on the side facet) may become helpful. Thanks to duane88, who graciously shared some pages from his 1940 catalog, I've learned that, Roth used the German-Gothic font through 1940. Unfortunately, in the images for the 1936/40 catalogs (same catalog, different dates,) are inconclusive. Can't be sure if the MOPs are cut, straight in a rectangle shape or, angled in a trapezoid shape; looks straight, to me. Also, you reminded me that, I never mentioned weights and measures for my bows. My gold bow weighs 60.2gm and 29 5/16" (tip-to-end of adjuster) the silver, 61.0gm and 29 7/16".
  12. Here you go PhilipKT (it's all in the search perimeters.) I ran across this after, I had purchased my silver Roth bow. When it was too late, to be able, to view the photos. Once, I saw a violin on eBay, being auctioned as a Roth (from a Texas seller who, has offered several questionable, "Roth," instruments.) A crafty counterfeiter had made a, somewhat, large brand from the "Roth" part of his signature, complete with underline, I can't recall if there was a label, too; but, I think not. The Roth firm, in response to a query, confirmed that it was not on of their brands.
  13. I remember reading the MN post about that (I assume it was yours,) and would love to see the photos. I, too, think these were by the same craftsman, each frog fit perfectly on the other stick. The screw on gold frog's adjuster was, maybe, 1/32" too long to fit the 3-starred stick. I wanted to switch them so, I filed it down and, was roundly chastised by my luthier, for that; I learned my lesson. As for the signature, it's a brand not, a stamp. Once that iron touches the wood, there's not too much you can do, to adjust it. If it's not straight or, not hot enough, there's little to do but, live with it. I don't think anybody's going to trash a bow over a crooked stamp but, maybe that's why there's only two stars on the one. I've always thought it odd that somebody would spend extra money for gold fittings, to save $5 on a cheaper stick. The 1924 catalog doesn't list bows but, they offer them. On the last page it states, "...The trimmings of these bows vary from sterling silver to fourteen karat gold, and their prices differ accordingly." In a 1936 brochure, from G.Schirmer, Inc.,43rd Street, New York, gold is not offered as an option.
  14. I am not a player, maker or dealer. I fell in love with the beauty of the luthier’s art after the first of my children joined 6th grade orchestra, in 2002. In Dec., 2015, I purchased a silver mounted Ernst Heinrich Roth 3-star violin bow, on eBay ($382); 14 months later, a gold mounted, 2-star bow ($447). Searching the internet, I have been unable to find any information about who might have, actually, made them or, the time frame. I understand that, most people consider Roth bows to be pedestrian, factory “shop" bows; not always. The frogs on these bows are, so very distinctive that, I should think an expert in German bows would be able to identify the maker from across the room. Although, I’ve seen other MOP slides cut in the shape of isosceles trapezoids, never any which, were cut at such an acute angle. Also, the angle remains constant, from the underslide, through the large and small heelplates, to the ferrule. The MOP used on these bows is of exceptional quality. Looking straight-on, they both appear to match their corresponding linings. Silver MOP on, silver trim and gold MOP on, gold trim. When looking, at an angle, the way the light is refracted, from tip-to-frog, the silver MOP turns to an iridescent pink; the gold MOP, a neon turquoise. From frog -to-tip, the silver looks like fire opal; the gold, like black opal. I believe, this quality is neither accidental nor common. I have recently contacted Mr. Wilhelm Roth, to try and learn the approximate age of these bows. The only information he could give me was the model numbers. Later, I sent more detailed photos, to which, he responded, “… It looks very special. We think it is not a shop bow. Maybe from the hand from our grand father Ernst Heinrich Roth I himself from Markneukirchen..." I am hoping that, with the combined experience and knowledge, of the Maestronet Community, the gaps can be filled. My Hypothesis Roth used (at least) three distinctly different stamps, I’ll call: Type-1; Type-2; Type-3. (see photos.) Type-1 uses a German Gothic-ish font, similar to the early and current Roth labels, uses upper and lowercase letters. The stars used on the Type-1 are, 6-point and 8-point, asterisks. The 6-point asterisks being straight lines arrayed about the center. The 8-point asterisks being straight lines with little dots on each end, arrayed about a slightly larger dot in the center. Type-1, are the earliest bows and are rarely offered, for sale, online. Type-2 uses a plain font with uppercase letters. E, H and R being larger than the other letters. The stars on type-2 stamps are 5-point stars with open centers. Type-2 is more commonly seen, online. Type-3 uses a plain font, all uppercase letters of the same size. This type uses 5-point, closed, stars, which appear to be impressed with a die that contains both name and stars. These appear to be of a much lower quality than the others. Type-4 bows are regularly offered, on eBay, often selling for only a couple of hundred dollars. My bows: My Hypothesis (Roth used, at least, three distinctly different stamps, I’ll call them: Type-1; Type-2; Type-3.) Type-1 uses a German Gothic-ish font, similar to the early and current Roth labels, uses upper and lowercase letters. The stars used on the Type-1 are, 6-point and 8-point, asterisks. The 6-point asterisks being straight lines arrayed about the center. The 8-point asterisks being straight lines with little dots on each end, arrayed about a slightly larger dot in the center. Type-1, are the earliest bows and are rarely offered, for sale, online. Type-2 uses a plain font with uppercase letters. E, H and R being larger than the other letters. The stars on type-2 stamps are 5-point stars with open centers. Type-2 is more commonly seen, online. Type-3 uses a plain font, all uppercase letters of the same size. This type uses 5-point, closed, stars, which appear to be impressed with a die that contains both name and stars. These appear to be of a much lower quality than the others. Type-4 bows are regularly offered, on eBay, often selling for only a couple of hundred dollars. Type-1 Roth Stamp: : Type-2 Roth Stamp: Type-3 Roth Stamp:
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