l33tplaya

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About l33tplaya

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    SoCal, SoCool. Live Long and Prosper
  • Interests
    Diving, Hacking, WorldBeat, Jazz, Blues, Folk, Classical

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  1. Or when you do things for 3 or 4 lettter agencies that are not public knowledge.
  2. Bridge City Tool Works has their low angle mini block plane on sale for 40% off, https://bridgecitytools.com/collections/planes/products/hp-8-mini-block-plane and their dual angle block plane also on sale. They have depth skids too. I just rceived my mini plane today, it looks really sweet. https://bridgecitytools.com/collections/planes I haven't heard that brand mentioned here before, but it seems very precisely made, and so far. measures very flat. I was informed of this sale by the last SIMSCal meeting, https://www.simscal.com/ . What are your thoughts on their planes?
  3. l33tplaya

    case age?

    I remember seeing this style of case mid to late 1960's, so perhaps earlier than the 1970's? Definitely on student instruments - professionals at the time used the heavy Hill style cases. Note lack of suspension, though there appears to be some padding under the body cut out. By the early 1970's and beyond, at least Shar was selling suspension cases. I really wanted one like this when I was a micro dude - the outside was thermoplastic, though maybe this one is contact paper over wood? I figured the plastic would be completely waterproof, so no more putting my violin case in a big plastic bag when it rained... -
  4. In addition to all the discussion about bridges, both acoustically and shaping, never mind movement, we had a discussion about prepared bridge stamps. The advantage of this "stamp" is that one can easily change it as desired, and add crude graphics as well. Price has gone down and capabilities have gone up. This one at kickstarter has a few more days at intro price. It's a low priced laser engraver. Thoughts?
  5. How did you modify them? Do you have a picture of an unmodified one to compare?
  6. A really interesting article on why and how razor blades dull. https://www.wired.com/story/why-do-razor-blades-dull-so-quickly/ What relevance to knife sharpening, dullness, etc. in violin making? Is it the same or similar mechanism? This would explain relatively frequent required light honing, but not more intense methods required to return to sharpness. Perhaps it would also explain the characteristics of various blade material - PM-11 vs O or A types, etc.
  7. BFOM? Brothas From Otha Muthas? Baliga's Figure of Merit?
  8. Wow. Thread has progressed in interesting ways. I lived in Westwood for about 10 years in the early 80's to 90's, and had not heard of Westwood Music. I visited the Cremona Violin Shop, because it was in Westwood; the proprieter was a Mr. Watanabe.
  9. BTW, Georg Eittinger has been helpful to me. Years ago, before I joined MN, I showed him what turned out to be a misattributed violin, and he was the first to identify what it wasn't and make suggestions as to what I could do (why I joined MN). I didn't realize he is a Geigenbaumeisterbrief and worked for J & A Beare. He has moved from LA to San Marino (where the Huntington Library is, just outside Pasadena).
  10. https://www.latimes.com/entertainment-arts/business/story/2020-07-22/the-mystery-of-a-stolen-rare-cello-has-a-surprise-ending The image revealed the luthier’s label, visible through one of the curlicued f-holes. Across it was a note inscribed in the feathery pen of the master himself: Pour la petite Comtesse Marie 1834. “For the little Countess Marie.” “I could hardly believe it,” she recalled. The cello had been given to her as a child by her father; nearly 40 years earlier, it had been stolen. Custom-made for the daughter of a French aristocrat two centuries ago, it was a spectacular, rare one-eighth-size cello produced by Bernardel, protégé of Nicolas Lupot, violin maker to King Louis XVIII. Bernardel’s craftsmanship earned him renown as among the finest string instrument makers in France.....
  11. I don't think that was a Ceruti...
  12. 2 reactions: Son Terry (he was blind) and Brownie McGhee are my favorites. .. Sonny's squall is amazing. But.... Wow, in this day and age that scene does not translate. At all. Borderline or frankly racist. And I like Steve Martin too. I think he has a Whyte Laydie, amongst other banjos. True story, after the first few years together, Sonny and Brownie couldn't stand each other. They broke up, but people insisted on seeing the two of them together. So for the next 20 years or so (?), they didn't speak to each other. Still made some of the most amazing music.
  13. The review site is up, but apparently the database site has moved or is defunct.
  14. You are too funny. Or prescient. Seriously, it's usually 3rd party data processors, because the requirements to process securely are too onerous for smaller or even large companies, and no one wants to deal with it properly. 3rd parties are supposed to conform to regulatory standards as well as the hiring company standards. In my experience, over half do not, which is why some of us get paid to tell them what they are doing wrong. Now we have much stricter GDPR and CCPA (California does something right), as well as tough new standards in Maine, which is the first to require opt-in of consumer information sales, vs California and Nevada, et al, which are opt out. https://www.csoonline.com/article/3429608/11-new-state-privacy-and-security-laws-explained-is-your-business-ready.html
  15. The link: https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/liveauctioneers-reports-data-breach-after-user-records-sold-online/ The cause: "trusted" third party partner. Of course. Irresponsible.