Davide Sora

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About Davide Sora

  • Rank
    Enthusiast
  • Birthday 01/07/1964

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    http://www.davidesora.it

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Cremona, Italy
  • Interests
    Violin making

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  1. Davide Sora

    Who do retouch thicknesses from outside ?

    Some of those scans were published here, just an image of the supposed soundpost crack. http://www.cremonabooks.com/eng/shop_dettaglio.php?id=3103
  2. Davide Sora

    "Supplemental ringing" of tap tones

  3. Davide Sora

    Light color varnish examples?

    A pale color which is convincing (not too bright yellow) I think it's the most difficult to reach, everything depends on the color of the wood and the ground. Anyway, all the Amatis works are a must.
  4. Davide Sora

    "Supplemental ringing" of tap tones

    Will this coupling betwen modes remain even after gluing? I bet no, at least in my experience trying to verify this with the ribs glued. I do not know if it is worth looking for this octaves tuning, but I could easily be wrong. Just a thought.
  5. Davide Sora

    "Supplemental ringing" of tap tones

    I am a bit confused with your description..... For getting a clue, what frequency is it the main tap tone you hear? Is the bassbar there or not? If it is the case may be an overlapping between M5 and M6 if frequency is around 350 to 380 hz (more or less). Trying to isolate the two modes holding the plate in different position along nodal lines may help to get a clue.
  6. Davide Sora

    Who do retouch thicknesses from outside ?

    Ok, I'm sorry. I had seemed to read something between the lines that evidently was not there. My bad.
  7. Davide Sora

    Who do retouch thicknesses from outside ?

    I personally do not think that working on the finished instrument is wrong, on the contrary I think it can work to a certain extent to improve results. But I think it's basically a matter of choices, it's not the only way to get good results and I do not think we need to argue that those who do not do it are wrong, which is often the message that creeps into this kind of discussion. Regarding your point : 6) If this is so great, how come your instruments don't sound like a Strad? does this mean that working from outside all the violins will sound like the Strads? I'm sorry, but I do not see evidence of this. I have never had the opportunity to listen to your instruments and I have no reason to doubt their quality, but really, do your violins sound like a Strad?
  8. Davide Sora

    Function of central thickness of back plate

    I do not think that this is necessarily to attribute to a later regraduation, but it could have been done directly by the author. I think that the central pin was a fairly standard starting point, used as a center for a compass to trace the circles where to measure thicknesses, but then during working the point of maximum thickness could be moved according to the needs. I usually start with a standard reverse diapason as max thickness point, but only rarely remains there at the end, usually it always lowers towards the bridge. As Andreas Preuss, I do not think it is important the exact center of maximum thickness, but rather the size of the area of relative high thickness that will determine the stiffness of the central area.
  9. Davide Sora

    Tap tuning a violin back

    All the rest, understanding wood properties during working and making the right choices to take out the best instrument from a given wood. This is usually what good makers do, I don't know the study you mention, but I think that experienced makers are able at least to avoid buying wood with irremediably bad acoustic properties, unless they are blind, deaf and with numb hands
  10. Davide Sora

    Tap tuning a violin back

    All these numbers and percentages seem unreliable like tuning the modes of the free plates, completely inconsistent and not verifiable. For a modern maker, given the decidedly superior competition in terms of quality from other luthiers than at the time of Stradivari, I think it's a better strategy to produce less, with better accuracy and with less randomness of results. Unless one is satisfied that his instruments are appreciated only after his death....
  11. Davide Sora

    Tap tuning a violin back

    http://www.stewmac.com/Materials_and_Supplies/Instrument_Kits/Violin_Kits/Fiddle_Kit.html But Kavakos plays a Stradivari, though......
  12. Davide Sora

    Tap tuning a violin back

    Fortune always help, bad luck does not allow to achieve excellent results
  13. Davide Sora

    Tap tuning a violin back

    Pigments and naturally colored resins. Alcohol varnish, expecially the pigmented layers, are rather thinned with solvent (at least mine), I need about 15 layers of pigmented varnish to get the color intensity I like, the rest is golden yellow varnish and without pigments but increase color saturation. Also with my colophony oil varnish the thickness is quite similar, but of course the number of layers applied is much less because I use a very little diluted varnish in this case (fingers application). Also the weight estimate is very similar between the two. My estimate of the 0.1 mm thickness is not measured with precision instruments, but applying the varnish on a glass plate and measuring with a decimal thickness gauge. In any case I never heard of a thickness greater than 100 microns (0.1 mm) in scientific measurements of Stradivari varnishes.
  14. Davide Sora

    Tap tuning a violin back

    I reach a 0.1 varnish thickness with more then thirty layers of alcool linoxyn varnish, quite intense in color if I like.
  15. Davide Sora

    Tap tuning a violin back

    No, 0.1 mm is more realistic.