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miles

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Everything posted by miles

  1. I sometimes does that because I wanted to know the highest price the current winner placed. Although I am not a shill-bidder, some may. Regardless, I think when buying something, it is always wise to cap the bid at the amount that your bank account can afford. In regard to comments on Jesse, although I have not met him in person, I have always benefitted from his posts and PM (maestronet or eBay). I believe his honesty and generosity. But then again, no one is perfect (applicable to both the seller and the buyer), and his return policy should rectify any faults (or no faults) that one might have in the transaction.
  2. I feel sorry for myself for being too late in finding this post--The photos are gone. Is it possible to post them for learning purposes? Many thanks in advance.
  3. I wonder how a custom official/staff knew that Ms. Horigome had an expensive instrument that she alleged to owe taxes on. Equally perplexing is that he (or she) knew exactly how much taxes Ms. Horigome had alleged evaded. Is this a simple case as reported or is it just a tip of an iceberg? In any event, wow (in a negative way)!
  4. Hmm, I actually downloaded a fingerboard chart in 2000 for about $14, which breaks down by GDAE and then some. Sorry I don't have it handy and cannot tell you more about it. I think I was still using it in 2006. Another one I had is a sticker, which I put it on a violin I used exclusively for my lesson. The sticker was a life saver for me because my violin teacher is Japanese, who often made me so nervous that I forgot what was what.
  5. I've got quite a few decent violins on eBay and almost equal amount of bad violins there through my early years as well. I don't know whether I have the best one, but one of the good violins I got was a master Roth, which I outbid knorr by either one or ten dollars. The worst one I will definitely say the one which the seller described as ready to play. However, the violin arrived my door with NO soundpost and an ugly re-varnished job. I emailed the seller inquiring the missing soundpost, and he replied that not all violins come with a soundpost, and that if I wanted one, I needed to send him the violin back with $100 for him to put one in. By the way, I received a negative feedback on eBay from such seller for sharing my experience.
  6. I've got quite a few decent violins on eBay and almost equal amount of bad violins there through my early years as well. I don't know whether I have the best one, but one of the good violins I got was a master Roth, which I outbid knorr by either one or ten dollars. The worst one I will definitely say the one which the seller described as ready to play. However, the violin arrived my door with NO soundpost and an ugly re-varnished job. I emailed the seller inquiring the missing soundpost, and he replied that not all violins come with a soundpost, and that if I wanted one, I needed to send him the violin back with $100 for him to put one in. By the way, I received a negative feedback on eBay from such seller for sharing my experience.
  7. While I totally agree with Bob A's argument on due diligence, I found such position incomplete, which, I believe, can be complemented by Option 1's position. I might be wrong, but Bob's posts reads to me that if you perform due diligence, you will not fall for any fraud. In reality, believe or it, due diligence may not always be feasible due to special circumstances or lack of information (especially, not reports, records or policing available). Take for example, the church land theft case in Chicago, first reported by Ray Gibson/Robert Beck of Chicago Tribune in May 21, 2006. One could only wonder what is real and what is illusion. Attached please find the first story of the series. 20060521_Who_Took_the_Land_from_Churches.pdf
  8. Interesting. Somehow I was under an impression that Vuillumes started copying master's work as well.
  9. I wonder why this fellow used his son's violin (1/2) to illustrate how to hold the violin and bow. I like Professor V's lessons on youtube, and also a few others: (1) Michael Hegeman: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=michae...amp;view=videos (it seems that Hegeman removed his instruction videos, but he listed his website). (2) LSO master class: (only the first lesson so far)(3) Roy Sonne: Have a great holiday season!
  10. Finally, I finished this thread and the threads on V.com. According to Dov Schmidt, Gammunto appears to be a maker of ability, ability to make violins from scratch (as opposed to remake so-called white violins) since Gammunto has purchased tone wood from him over the years. So I would think that his best defense is not a lawyer, but a video documenting his work from A to Z. I remember Matt did that before on his website, and, therefore, it is not technically impossible. In addition, such video documentary can also serve as marketing/promotion of his violins as well--"Catching" two birds with one stone, which Mr. Gammunto has nothing to lose but everything to win.
  11. Hmm, David, that would certainly give it away, wouldn't it?
  12. I certainly agree that one should be careful in making a statement when it might affect another person's ability to bring home bacon. But up to this point, I have not seen that you provided any evidence to make a case for Gammunto violin(s). Do you expect us, potential buyers, to take your words for it? Then again, do we know you? The other Gammuto violin owner's long post regarding Chinese violins certainly doesn't do my Chinese violins justice. Among my Chinese violins, I have Eastman master line (Ling Wang 605, 905), Scott Cao 850, a few of SM Zhang and one by an unknown maker (bird eye). As voiced by other posters, I don't think it is possible to generalize Chinese violins with a few "syndromes". What if Mr. Gammunto remade a Chinese violin, which is not covered in the owner poster's classification of Chinese violins?
  13. I have two violins with oil varnish, one of which, made in 2004 in the US, the varnish never seems to dry at all, especially in the summer if I leave it in the case. The other made in 2005 in Bulgaria, but the weather doesn't seem to have any impact on its varnish--completely dry. I don't know whether there is any difference in what was in the oil varnish or how they were applied differently. I now stick to spirit varnish.
  14. Hmm, I thought it was the bio-liquid (urine, that is) that made Strad and del Gesu violins so darn good.
  15. Thanks for the article, Priya. If I remember correctly, richietman, like Jesse, offers unconditional refund (minus shipping). As long as the refund part is guaranteed, I don't have problems buying online.
  16. quote: Originally posted by: Allan Speers quote: "He bought the violin for $2,000 in 1985 ...... And now it's worth $100K? Who told me violins are not good for investment?
  17. quote: Originally posted by: Andrew Victor Check this out: ">http://p078.ezboard.com/fcello...376.topic&index=2 BUT - it is also possible that your OHIO rehair has put more hair in your bow than it should have - this will result in a mushy response. When that has happened to me, I trim some hairs away untill I get the behavior I want... Andy, Could this also be a reason not to use a viola/cello bow to play on the violin? I am curious about why violinists don't use a viola bow (or a cello bow for that matter). Thank you.
  18. I don't know much about other Cao's model, but I have his 850 model. It is easy to play and sounds great, and I like it better than my Eastman Strings Ling Wang 905. Cao 750 for under $500 is a steal!
  19. $550K-$750K for a real dG these days sounds like a bargain. :-)
  20. quote: Originally posted by: Cytorrak I'm sorry to all. I belatedly just did a search on him on previous threads and found out that there has been quite an animated discussion about him already and that there has actually been some controversy about him and the Amati Foundation. Thus, I will not be surprised anymore if there are not much replies as so much has already been exchanged about him. In any case, I do have a Soloist version done by him (or Zheng Quan or Chan Chong if I got the names right from the previous threads) that is uspported by a certificate and I am very happy with it despite having tried so many other violins. Hi Cytorrak, Sorry for the belated response; this is the first time I visited any forum since January. In any event, I have a couple of violins by/from Zhang & his workshop. For the price I paid, I think I've got great deal/great value. Hi yuen, Nice picture! I'm now convinced you were a handsome looking young lad as you claimed. I disagree, however, with the statement "knowledge without power is a pusscat"--power is within oneself! All the best! from exceedingly happy miles...
  21. Not to take anything away from Banzai's contribution in making "the missing link" (which I doubt anyone is able to), I would like to point out that Paul Hawken was already mentioned by Bean_fidhleir, whose intellectual capacity sparkles and speaks volume for himself throughout this thread. The issues presented in this thread, with a doubt in my mind, open up our little self-world to our place as a species in space and time echoing Darwin's landmark works albeit on a smaller scale. quote: Originally posted by: bean_fidhleir FinProf, Miles can speak for herself of course, but my impression was that she was criticising capitalism wherever it's located, and the US only because it is the "apex (capitalist) predator". Capitalism as practiced is based on the belief that the world is both an inexaustible garden and an uncloggable sewer. As Paul Hawken among others has illuminated, capitalism refuses to account for all its costs. The costs expressed as pollution are ignored, but pollution cleanup is considered a positive value, which is crazy! But Earth tallies up the costs accurately even if the accountants don't, and she's made it increasingly obvious that she's going to get rid of us completely unless we get our act together SOON. Yet we show every sign of still not listening. We have intelligent, mentally healthy professionals like yourself, with kids and grandkids who will bear the brunt of Earth's displeasure, still apparently not tuned in. Paul Ehrlich remarked in an interview that every scientist he knows is "scared sh****ss" right now, and it's not hard to see why. Happy New Year (I hope) to all!
  22. Thank you, Banzai. Your post pretty much answered my tedious questions, and provided the so-called the missing link. Through marketing and propaganda (incidentally poorly distributed school funding methods?), we have been attuned to consume/stock a great deal of goods or luxurious items we do not (ever) need. As a consequence, there seems to be a vicious circle, that traps us inside a so-called rat race, a race which exhausts ourselves and our environment to death in the end. I don't recall that I debuked you or anyone for writing lengthy posts. If I did, I am now rebuking myself for rebuking your lengthy posts. Are you going to write an even longer one now? Just kidding.
  23. Dear dfxlr, I believe I had addressed your points to my best ability with honest. Thank you very much for your kindness. Life has been very kind to me, and I am grateful for the opportunities I've been given. May life be good to you, too. [edited] dfxlr, RE: I think my post was in support of GM, not answering to him You misread/missed "Hi jimbow", which appears on the 4th line of the body of the quote. Therefore, you ascribed the following statement was for you. Nope, it was not for you. Please check again before you jump to conclusion.
  24. quote: Originally posted by: dfxlr I believe I was one of the first (in reply to a certain person) to point out that it is dangerous to take sentences out of context. As such, I had left this part of the board in hopes that it'd be cooled down when I got back. It hasn't. Dear dfxlr, If I recall correctly, you are the one who wrote in the whole post, "It is culture that bound women's feet. -- Said by me, a Chinese American" What is the frame of context you took the "culture" from? In addition, it appears that you forgot to read Bean_fidhleir's post and GM22's subsequent post responding to Bean's, which GM apparently changed his mind or position: "It may be acceptable or even desirable to read, but it is exeedingly difficult and fruitless to answer." If I read the statement correctly, the problem has been shifted from "style of quoting" to "practicality of answering questions". Therefore, the accusation of my taking things out of context should, in this thread at least, be exonerated. Please read responses more thoroughly lest you might also violate what you were preaching. Thank you and Happy New Year to you, too!
  25. Hi FinProf, Thank you very much for answering my quesitons. First of, I think you might have mixed the posters' statements. When you stated my premise about capitalism, Allan's post came to my mind. Secondly, when I first mentioned capitalism, I was responding to posters, who stated explicitly how intelligent humans were (as I explained to your first post addressed to me), I just saw no intelligence in a lot of things humans do, . In addition, my expressed view on capitalism in this thread is not what you thought it was although I would not disagree with such view by and large. Thirdly, my reason for asking the "tedious" 9 questions was to provoke some thoughts--What does capitalism have done to/with our brain? Having lived in the US for near 2 decades and travelled in most cities, even if I don't have the first hand experience you described, I most likely heard of it before. My point is, take education for example, why does the quality of your schools in the US have to differ greatly from one district to another? Think about it. Yes, it is probably safe to say that all of us, human beings, have contributed to environmental problems one way or another. But my interest is in the reason why the environment has degraded so much and so rapidly in such short period of time (relative in terms of history or evolution). If one put the environmental issues alongside with social evolution, the answer seems to be quite obvious to me. Lastly, believe it or not. I still remember you mentioned that your wife was from Taiwan from other thread, and I figured that you were college bound. But when I write or speak, I don't have "a person" in my mind. That means, I only look at what they said, not who they are. I may misunderstand or my knowledge stand to be corrected, but my remarks don't usually aim as personal attack. That's why I prefer to quote the points/statements I want to dispute in a point-by-point fashion. If the statement or point to be debated is not made explicit, I don't know how other people can follow. "I believe that ignoring social costs is endemic in human behavior and certainly not a product of the capitalistic system." I agree with the first part, but not the second part. "This is a rather depressing thought for those of you who believe that socialism will cure all of the world's ills." I have not gotten the sense in other posts, but I can only speak for myself. "Please note that I didn't ask any questions and refrained from quoting any previous posts. I hope my position and yours are very clear." Just saw this statement, please allow me to at least quote Allan's post. quote: Originally posted by: Allan Speers quote: Originally posted by: bean_fidhleir Capitalism as practiced is based on the belief that the world is both an inexaustible garden and an uncloggable sewer. Nah, Capitalism as practiced is based on the belief (of the CEO, etc) that they will die before the garden runs out and the sewer backs up. OR: Capitalism as practiced is based on the belief that someone else will fix the problem.
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