Kallie

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About Kallie

  • Rank
    Enthusiast
  • Birthday 08/06/1993

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    South-Africa
  • Interests
    Violin, Piano, Violin making and repair, Music, etc.

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5435 profile views
  1. My fingernails are always as short as they can possibly be without bleeding So definitely not that. Thanks for all the explanations and suggestions though. Don Noon's explanation on the mechanical side sums it up well.
  2. Fair enough. Although interestingly, now that you mention it being the most used, I've had the same problem on my viola, again on the A String even though the A string on a viola receives less use than D or G would.
  3. Hi, I'm wondering if there is any specific reason why the A-String always seems to be the first string that wears out. I always have the problem that it unravels on the 3rd finger in 1st position (The note D). Ive had this problem with literally all the strings I've used. Evah Pirazzi Gold, Evah Pirazzi, Thomastik Dominant, Warchal, etc. The ones which have lasted the longest was the Warchal Brilliant, and the Evah Pirazzi Gold. The one which lasted the shortest, was the Dominant. All the other strings (G, D and E) are fine even after the same amount of use, as I always replace the whole set rather than individual strings. The case I use doesn't require a strap to keep the violin secure. So it can be ruled out that the strap (which fastens around the same place) is what's damaging the string. Also it's worth noting that I'm not the only person with this problem. Most if not all of the violinists I've spoken to about this issue also have the same problem specifically on the A String. Obviously I don't expect strings to last forever, but it is certainly curious as to why the A string usually causes problems first, while the other strings are perfectly fine still. (Photo below is of my current set, the Evah Pirazzi Gold strings). Looking forward to hearing some responses. Thanks.
  4. The market value on these "cheap factory" instruments depends on where you live and how easily the instruments are obtainable. I generally sell these for about 300$, which includes Dominant strings or similar (already about 80$), a new bridge, re-fitted pegs, a new tailpiece and new soundpost.
  5. Some of the pictures won't upload. Keep getting "-200" error.
  6. No signs of a rebuilt neck heel. Only 2 small wedges on both sides.
  7. Sorry, neck graft.
  8. Hi, Would I be correct in saying this violin was made in Mittenwald, probably around late 1800s? No signs of a scroll graft. No label. Thanks in advance.
  9. I put mine in the case like shown in the picture. Just put a cloth over the scroll and pegs like shown in the picture and it won't scratch the wood.
  10. Will give it a try. Thanks.
  11. Correct me if I'm wrong, but according to the catalog, aren't the Brazilwood bows only stamped with "Knoll". Without the * stars, or the name Alfred?
  12. Thank you for the link to that file. It looks to be similar to this one.
  13. Hi, I found this bow in a box full of old bows I have. Is it possible to tell from the photos what wood it is, and if it's worth a rehair? Thanks in advance.
  14. Well she has 10 Million subscribers. She's sorted for life.