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joerobson

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About joerobson

  • Birthday 06/18/1950

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    http://www.violinvarnish.com
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    Trumansburg, NY

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  1. Christian, I checked the picture on my wife's iPad. Looked the same to me...but I have no claim to technical savvy. My intent here is to show the depth and detail of the silking in the spruce. This surface is nearly ready for varnishing. I am not a fan of "dark" at this point. on we go,, Joe
  2. Peter, Thanks. New phone + tripod. on we go, Joe
  3. Spruce in the morning light. Almost ready for color varnish.
  4. A bit of help if you would. I have a client looking for some decent pictures or video of the Lord Wilton. Thanks. on we go, Joe
  5. Wash oil in a plastic water bottle. Allow oil and water to separate. Put bottle in freezer. When the water is frozen, pour off the oil. Repeat as necessary.
  6. Black is not so easy. If this was my project I would use shellac. Get some blonde flake in about a 3 pound solution...thick enough to carry the color but not too thick to brush. Get some pigment that is used in the print industry...like Cosmic Black....which will wet well in alcohol solution. Add a touch of castor oil for flow....just a few drops. Paint. Between each coat rub out ALL the brush marks. Many coats. Have patience. Many coats. Have fun. on we go, Joe Oh yeah....I did a sunburst this way centuries ago.
  7. This maple begins to remind me of the Bergonzi Cramer Heath. The quarter cut figure competes and sometimes overcomes the flame.
  8. No....but the potassium is provided by the corrosive action of the lye.
  9. Potassium silicate. There are references in old cabinetmaker"s documents about horsetail as a polishing tool. It was not used flat like sandpaper. The reeds were bundled like a small broom. The ends of the reeds were scored and frayed with a knife. The bundle was the soaked in "weak barber's acid". Then the broom was used to polish bare wood. Barber's acid is a weak lye solution. Silicate from the horsetail + potassium from the lye solution = potassium silicate. on we go Joe
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