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LilHobbit

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  1. That's rather unfortunate. Regardless of whether it's from the Nurnberger shop or not, it's still an awesome playing bow. Was it common to etch the West Germany, East Germany or just Germany into the bow in that location behind the frog by the shop itself? It could also be that I'm seeing it incorrectly (it is time for another eye exam!)
  2. I recently picked up this Nurnberger Violin bow that plays quite nicely. It's stamped Albert Nurnberger with an engraving beside the frog that I believe reads "W Germany". Given the West Germany stamp, would anyone be able to give an idea of when it was made? No stars next to the name either.
  3. I just purchased a better instrument. And yes, it came with good fittings but that doesn't mean I like them. Some people have preferences as to whether they want rosewood, boxwood, ebony, etc on their violin or even fittings from a specific maker. I really like the quality/look of Bogaro & Clemente fittings and would like to put them on this violin at some point.
  4. I'm not planning on removing the silver as it's still in really good shape. The only issue I have is with the leather which I'll swap out for the same thing. As far as the violin fittings, I have two really good luthiers in my area that I know will fit pegs properly without destroying the pegbox. I'm contemplating swapping the current fittings with a nice set from Bogaro & Clemente!
  5. The winding is fine and I have no need to replace that. The leather on the other hand seems to be wearing out. More specifically, the underside of the leather where your thumb rests seems is driving me crazy. It’s particularly squishy at this spot and flattens completely when bowing.
  6. I recently purchased a Nurnberger Violin Bow - labeled Albert Nurnberger, W Germany. I’m not a huge fan of the bow grip and would like to get it replaced. Considering I’ve never had a bow grip replaced, much less on a decent violin bow, does it matter what I have it replaced with in order to preserve the quality/value of the bow? Would a different bow grip change the sound or feel of the bow itself? Should I use something that would have been traditional to a Nurnberger bow or does it really matter? What is your preference on material for bow grip? Have you found that you prefer ce
  7. Thanks for the info! This is one of my two finalist violins at the moment. I’ve already order a set of Evah Golds for whichever violin I end up purchasing!
  8. I'm guessing it's not original setup. Honestly, I'm not a huge fan of the light colored finishings. If I purchase, I may have them redo finishings in rosewood at one point.
  9. Sorry, should have clarified. That confirmation came directly from the Roth firm.
  10. Thanks for the heads up on it. If i do end up purchasing it, I will definitely address those issues with the shop first.
  11. I did get confirmation that it is a Roth VII-R made in 1930 with Ernst Heinrich Roth I as the Luthier of the violin with original varnish.
  12. Many commented on another violin I was looking at, a supposed Paul Mangenot. Seems it was kind of suspicious as to maker/ quality and so I went to another local shop to check out some other instruments. I came across this Roth violin, circa 1930. It has the Ernst Heinrich Roth stamped into the bottom with the Serial Number D478 and it appears the label was removed at one point. Where the label should be, I can see pencil marks that state VII-R. I have little doubt that this is a genuine EH Roth violin and it has a beautiful, crisp, clean sound to it. It’s also a gorgeous looking violin.
  13. Thanks! I'm completely unfamiliar with vanishing techniques and methods so wasn't sure if that was normal.
  14. I was looking at a violin I've been contemplating purchasing and having a closer look at the viokin itself, I have a question about the varnish. It looks like this violin has a medium brown varnish on it as well as a darker brown varnish. I'm beginning to wonder if the darker varnish came long afterwards? There are many spots in which it goes over top of the purfling and looks kind of "messy". Is this something that was done by makers on purpose? Or was it more likely that this was someone years after the fact that "re-varnished" it in an attempt to fix or update it? If it was the latte
  15. After all the discussion here, I’m second guessing this violin. It has a beautiful sound but I am concerned about the crack. I already contacted the shop and they said they would absolutely repair it. I had no doubt that they would. I looked at my other local shop today and have found a Roth violin that I’m quite intrigued by. Only bad thing is that since it’s not the shop I purchased my current violin from, I’d lose a bit of money on the trade in. Currently, I have an Elias Guasti bow that plays quite nicely. Upgrading the bow is not out of the question though.
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