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GK

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Everything posted by GK

  1. I live in an apartment and practice all the time with the heavy solid metal mute the folks here are talking about. Yes after 7 months of use I can see a little wear on the bridge, however I bet I'll still get a few years out of the bridge before I'll need to replace it. The trick is to put it on gently without slamming it down hard on to the bridge. The metal mute really, really cuts the volume. It is the only way I can practice late at night. I've also tried the Yamaha electric "silent" violin. And to be honest, it is cool in some ways, but leaves quite a bit to be desired. Elderly Instruments (517) 372-7890 has the big metal mutes for $8.75 via mail order. Part #VM50
  2. I've played guitar for 28 years, taught it for 20. Went and saw the movie "The Red Violin" last July and went out the next week and bought a violin and started taking lessons. Up until that point I had never even held one under my chin. Bluegrass interests me the most. My teacher started me on "Cripple Creek", now I'm up to "Jerusalem Ridge". It is great fun and also helps my guitar teaching by knowing what it feels like to be a beginner, again...
  3. I own what people tell me is a 100 year old Schweitzer (copy) with a solid moderately flamed back. This one has been regraduated at some point, and people comment that it is much warmer and more open then most of the breed. Some people say most of them are on the bright side. This one is not. It seems to be a good bluegrass instrument. The high E seems a little out of balance (ie: loud) however at least it has a flute like tone on the E. Mine seems to be quite sensitive to changes in setup and hardware, and even temporarily lost it's tone and sounded very choked after soaking up too much humidity at an outdoor bluegrass event. A few days later the tone came back. I am curious also as to what makes it a "Schweitzer" and how many German makers copied this type of fiddle.
  4. Previous posts convince me that if I only have $200 to spend on a bow the Glasser Carbon Graphite (Fiber) is the way to go. I'm ready to shop...Any tips on a good mail order source for one of these?
  5. GK

    Insurance

    If one needs "commercial use" coverage for musical instruments, at a good price, try Clarion Insurance 1-800-VIVALDI
  6. I'll preface this with the fact that I'm new at this, at 7 months... I seem to have much better intonation with my cheap Glasser bow, that I think has synthetic nylon bow hair, than with my nicer wood bow, with the real horse stuff. I have a cheap but suprisingly good feeling Chinese bow that everyone that's tried it thinks it's a $300-400 bow (it was $115)and it weighs about 60 grams. Anyway it has its original 7 month old hair, and it has always seemed a bit rough. If you don't really keep it moving sometimes the note will drop in pitch slightly as it catches the string. I know this is normal to a point, however my Glasser beginner bow barely ever does this, even with its extra weight and frumpy feel, the notes stay stable in pitch, almost down to a crawl. I've tried washing the bow hair, and even sanding the hair lightly, which actually helps for a day or so. Maybe these lower priced bows come with cheap rough hair??? It has done this since day one. I'm playing mainly bluegrass, and have used Helicore strings, however now I'm trying dominants, and I use the dark Hill Rosin. THANKS!!!
  7. After fiddling for about 5 hours tonight in my apartment, I recieved my first complaint... To be expected, the combination of 10pm and my lack of experience (playing 7 months) probably didn't win over any music fans...Anyway, I've looked at the Yamaha silent violin, and to be honest it seems pretty cheap, and I've noticed that japanese electric guitars seem to always have problems in time, mainly with the cheap quality of the switches, pots, and jacks. Anyway I've yet to actually hear one of these in action, and it would serve it's purpose for night owl practice sessions. Any comments on it's tone??? And build quality? I have a respectable 100 year old german fiddle, with a nice warm tone, and I have a couple of different mutes, but that gets old quick. I play mainly bluegrass, and I need practice, practice, practice... THANKS!
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