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Ron1

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Everything posted by Ron1

  1. Ron1

    Mystery Violin

    It's not that I don't want to see a graft- it's just that it looks like the graining runs through the "graft lines". Maybe it's just a super job of grafting, but the top photo doesn't show that great of a job. Maybe, like you said, he used the same piece of wood, and was able to match the graining perfectly..
  2. Ron1

    Mystery Violin

    If the picture still isn't there, & you have the patience, this should work: http://mysite.verizon.net/maunesha/
  3. Ron1

    Mystery Violin

    Ooops... there's my photo uploading expertise showing again. I'll try this again-
  4. Ron1

    Mystery Violin

    Here's an early 20th century original graft, done to attach a pear-wood head. I think it's a very [image]mysite.verizon.net/maunesha/[/image] nicely done graft, but at least it can be seen!
  5. Ron1

    Mystery Violin

    Tyler- I appreciate the additional picture for my benefit, but frankly there is still nothing there to make me suspect it's a real graft, other than variation in the varnish/color. Thomas.
  6. Ron1

    Mystery Violin

    The absence of a graft may actually be more important than the presence of one- it could be of some help in determinating or estimating the age of an instrument. While it's true the existence of a graft doesn't prove anything by itself, I think it's fair to say that as a part of a body of information, it could have some importance.
  7. Ron1

    Mystery Violin

    Tyler, I know you're holding the instrument & looking at it in your hand, but I have to agree with falstaff's observation. I find it very difficult to believe that's really a grafted scroll. I've seen grafted joints that look much better (more difficult to see), but never that good a match of woods & grain.
  8. A couple of early guesses- not based on knowledge, but rather by comparing with a few known outlines. The first seems like Goffriller; the second, a Strad (or at least modelled after); the third has the most distinctive outline & probably should be readily identifiable, but I don't have a clue. Ron.
  9. Don't know if this is a system glitch or just me (as usual), but after I post a message, I'm returned to the forum, as promised, but I am unable to proceed from there- I always end-up back at my post. In order to get back, I always have to go back to "main index" & then click "peg-box", etc. ???
  10. I AM serious about this. Is it Vee ohm'; Vill ohm'; Vill awm'; Vill aw may'; OR WHAT?
  11. I just learned that pernambuco is pronounced per'nam boo" ko; now could someone please show me how to pronounce "Vuillaume"? This is the problem with getting info from a computer instead of via face-to-face discussions. Anyone else need help with any problem words/names, or know of some that are frequently pronounced wrong?
  12. A search on this forum for the thread "To spray or not to spray" will reveal more info on airbrushes, including my 2-cents, which I won't repeat here.
  13. Yeah, you're right about that- some of the "ex's" were mediocre players (relatively speaking). Thanks for the insights, Seth an Michael.
  14. Your comments regarding the Hill's originating some of the 'Ex-owners' makes sense- although it flys-in-the-face of the comment Michael got about it being an American thing. I recently obtained an instrument that I believe belonged to a noteworthy person; if it turns out I'm correct, I wondered if I could make such a designation.
  15. So, are you saying it's the "owner" who is/was well known, rather than the instrument? And anyone can use this 'sales tool"? (If it's true, of course).
  16. Can only an instrument by a 'famous' maker be so designated? Or is it the "ex-owner" that has to be, or have been 'famous'? Or both? Who can determine if such a designation may be used?
  17. Lupot- do you have any clues at all regarding the age or origin of the violin? Any distinguishing marks not visible on the photos? Ron.
  18. O.K., I went back & looked really good at those scrolls- I see what you're talking about, #2 IS much nicer looking when the whole is viewed. I think I'm learning. Are we getting off-subject here? Ron.
  19. The artist has put much more effort in the "portrait" part of the painting- quite obviously meant to be a likeness of the subject. The remainder of the painting appears to be "filled in", although I imagine the sitter did have/play a guitar. The filled-in body, etc., could also explain the strange head-to-body configuration. Ron.
  20. I have to agree with Jimbow- to me, #1 & #2 don't hold a candle to #3. The only possible "flaw" is as you mentioned, the space in the "throat" maybe a little much, but I think still looks better than the other "pinched" two. And the 4th pic. you put up is the same in that regard to #3, but nowhere near the craftsmanship. do I just not get it? Ron.
  21. Again, quite limited experience & knowledge, guessing: #1 possibly older, say 19th century; #2 & #3 both strike me as newer instruments that have "antiqued" finishes, rather than showing normal wear.
  22. I've compared my limited photos- #1 looks like a Strad/copy; #2 I can't i.d. with Strad, Stainer, or Guarneri; #3 seems like a Stainer/copy. ???
  23. Ron1

    stamp

    Hi Fiddlecollector- I know of an American maker who on occasion, at least, stamped his name in the flutes at the top of the scroll (the small part of the fluting). Ron1
  24. Occasionally this forum gets a little stagnant, and some threads fail to "grab" my interest. I enjoy being amused as well as learning from this forum (as a matter of fact, I learn something WHILE I'm being entertained or amused). I just went back 20 pages (I think I have 20 thread topics per page), and tallied-up those threads with the highest number of "Views" & "Replies" (Views being a measure of interest, & Replies a measure of participation). If ISOC is credited with 50% of the response from the thread "INTERIOR OF BACK" by Fiddlecollector (I believe half of that thread resulted from his input & the ensuing discussion), the top view/response generators are as follows: ISOC- 3,211 views, 121 responses; Dean Lapinel- 2,762/105; Ispirati- 1,575/116; Mark Hoffman- 1,424/68; Yuen- 1,248/34. If the forum was faster-paced, I might feel different, but all things considered, I feel ISOC's contributions definitely have some value to this forum. It's hard to deny that his threads contribute measurably to the interest and participation of forum members. Ron1
  25. How have you determined the approximate age & Norwegian origin? The Norwegian Hardanger fiddles usually were decorated with shell, ivory, and/or inked designs under the varnish. The Hardanger fiddles have 4 or more "sympathetic" strings under the fingerboard, in addition to the 4 strings above, and instead of a scroll, an animal head, often with a crown. If yours is a Hardanger fiddle, I could recommend an expert in that field. Ron.
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