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DonLeister

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Everything posted by DonLeister

  1. Just for one hot sunny day?
  2. This has worked for me. Carefully put a few drops of alcohol in the jar of varnish, put a flame to it, light it and quickly screw the lid on.
  3. I assume when you say 'people' you mean violin makers, correct?
  4. I have enjoyed your book! Thank you for sharing your work! And also for the measurements down load, i was dreading having to copy them off the website!
  5. That is the first time I used it. At first the saddle tilted back a little but I pushed the lower jaw in a bit and the saddle seated itself. There is no 'slop' between the jaws, the clamp has no barrel nuts like the bigger wooden kind. Originally it had 2 identical plastic jaws. I think it is good to make the endpin jaw a little small so it can go in and out as needed.
  6. In recent years my backs are usually in the 100 to 105 range at about those thicknesses or a little less (and plus or minus 5 grams). It's the tops that I have to work at to get the weights down usually. I'd rather not make suggestions and cloud the subject but keep asking questions instead. I know about enough to cause trouble.
  7. Next question is, is the arching that approaches the channels concave, flat or convex? And for very far? This helps me to picture and characterize your arching.
  8. Can you say how high the arch is, how thick the edges are? Is the channel bottom thickness right next to the inside line of the purfling or is it further away from the purfling?
  9. Are measurements of the bridges in the book?
  10. Can you indicate the height of the lines too? And thickness of the edges? Thanks!
  11. Hi Jeff, I used to use smaller spools of thread and so they would be held on the end there with a carriage bolt. Then I was given that big sample spool from Coates and Clark manufactures, at least a mile long, that you see there. It was too big to fit on the holder so it sits under the bench and I pull the thread through the clamp as needed.
  12. https://sawyer.com/products/permethrin-insect-repellent-treatment/ I have used this for years on many cases on Johnson Strings recommendation. It is water-based and will not foul bow hair.
  13. You said it Joe! Thanks for being straight. There are so many characters and caricatures here it is tiring to sort out the bunch.
  14. You said it Joe! Thanks for being straight. There are so many characters and caricatures here it is tiring to sort out the bunch.
  15. You said it Joe! Thanks for being straight. There are so many characters and caricatures here it is tiring to sort out the bunch.
  16. You said it Joe! Thanks for being straight. There are so many characters and caricatures here it is tiring to sort out the bunch.
  17. You said it Joe! Thanks for being straight. There are so many characters and caricatures here it is tiring to sort out the bunch.
  18. I made one batch of Fulton varnish 25 yrs ago. It is pale amber color and dries hard. Not chippy hard, more like plastic hard. I don't think it will chip, it is so tough. Rubbing out a final polish is difficult because it's like polishing plastic. Alcohol would not dissolve it or even soften it. I did not have any problem mixing the oil with the aged turps (cooked the turps and added it crushed to the hot oil). It dissolved easily with regular fresh turpentine after it cooled some. Used as a ground it's toughness and reflectivity is what I like it for. I still use it as a ground but not as a varnish. Especially if I don't want too much color in the wood. It can soak in a lot so you need to rub it off well and keeping rubbing it with chalk and rubbing that off until the rag looks clean. End grain areas need more chalking and rubbing out than other areas. It will feel practically dry at that point and will be perfectly sealed in one coat. It needs UV to dry of course.
  19. Thanks for explaining that, I can picture it now. That's an interesting experiment!
  20. Can you help me understand this Michael? If I understand correctly the string tied around the violin increased the break angle which means going from 156 down to 155 (more downward string pressure). How did you get the string around the violin to lessen the break angle and produce less downward force? It seems like increasing the angle to 180 would mean no downward force, right?
  21. What was your source for rosin? There are many ways it is produced and also from many differing trees.
  22. That's good to know. For some reason they can get better with more time according to a quick google on the subject. Also if you view them on youtube instead of the window here you can pause it without ads blocking half of it.
  23. Another side view of the 1711 Strad.
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