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rufviol

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Everything posted by rufviol

  1. 1)Daily practice and preparation for next class. 2)More money!
  2. quote: Originally posted by: nickia Hello I've found out that I've using too much to pressure from my right hand because the middle joint of my index finger becomes red literally after a playing session. I think i've read from somewhere that no pressure should be injected from the index finger when playing anything other than Forte. So I try to lighten up the bow arm by relaxing the hand but the bow just glide through the string especially near the tip. ..... How long have you been playing? It appears you can only do two extremes right now - press too much to make sound, till it hurts, or when trying to relax, put too little pressure and the bow goes all over. Which is very normal for beginers. With experience you'll figure out the correct amount of pressure. But your teacher should have helped you with this bow problem from your first month, even before any sight reading, or any other significant progress with your violin materials. It is OK initially if you can't sight read well, something too much emplasis is often placed on, but you're simply not a violinist if you can't make a good sound from your bow. The left hand can be worked on later. Learing to bow on open strings, with the right pressure is such a basic but boring and difficult exercise for most, that usually not much work is done there. Just bow open strings, try to regulate volume by bow speed/pressure until you find a good clean sound that you're happy with - this will be the basis of 'your sound'. It is not that hard, but needs a lot of work before you can, at will, play loud, play soft and be happy with your good clean tone. You can/should hold off on moving forward with repertoire, since it makes no sense to progress, in my opinion, without a decent sound that you can comfortably produce.
  3. quote: Originally posted by: Gray Violiner... If you doubt this in any way, go to your kitchen, get an egg out of the fridge and try keeping it intact with your current bow holding death grip. Messy, huh?
  4. Hmmm....you have yourself a huge problem here... one many parents would love to have! Get him a cello quick, any color he wants All the best!
  5. quote: Originally posted by: KOF Old people just learning will never be as good as young people because they have fewer brain cells and reflexes, and smarts Unfortunately true, they tend to use up a lot of those 'fewer' (as you suggest) brain cells while struggling to maintain internet and general social etiquette! Maybe it's time to look for your designated driver
  6. quote: Originally posted by: kathyk I would guess fewer adults quit than kids, especially if kids have the choice & not parentally enforced lessons. Absolutely true! People tend to forget this when proclaiming that learning violin is not for adults. In spite of this parental pressure, while I don't have numbers to support, I'd bet the 'failure rate' is higher for kids compared with adults. Some may argue that pressure is not necessary, often detrimental, but I'm not sure how many kids, especially with today's distractions would choose violin over electric guitar, more likely, an xbox over both!
  7. quote: Originally posted by: skiingfiddler ...it's a good idea to think about performing not as an act in which you display yourself to others ( a rather self centered approach, which most of us suffer from), but as an act of sharing something you like (music, in general, and certain music, specifically) with others. In this act of sharing, you are not the main attraction... Absolutely, and well said! It affects me to an extent when I'm presenting and a often still a little nervous perhaps, until I'm completely immersed in the content of my presentation, from where on my posture, my tie doesn't matter at all. Helps to realize that most audiences, want to have a good experience, they want you to succeed, they're secretly wishing you well, so just go ahead and do your thing!
  8. Majority of the human population cannot perform, (public speaking for example) in front of people. Lots of suggestions are available from 'just relax' (whatever that is) to picturing the audience in their underwear, to medication. I believe all are extremely questionable and don't help at all. I realize that people sufficiently medicated will disagree with me. Only real solution is practice, practice, practice with any and all audiences, family, your dog/cat, siblings, parents, friends, relatives, in spite of all those nervous screw ups, anxiety, whatever. You just have to live thru that hell, somehow get past it. It is not easy, but can and will only get better, especially if you don't dwell to much on the last negative experience and look forward to your next. Easier said than done of course, but you just need to somehow do it. Experience and sound preparation gives come confidence that always helps. (Hence the suggestion to others, be kind to younger people since all that high-school personality bashing, what seems liks 'kids just foolin around' severly affects confidence later on.)
  9. Allegro, GV, that's what I'm talking about! Just a little public interaction goes a long way towards keeping everyone interested in the classical music performing scene, or getting the younger ones into it!
  10. quote: Originally posted by: fmfischer...Also nice: A team of 2-4 technical assistants who change strings between the movements, re-rosin the bow hair: good teamwork!
  11. FMF, I'm not sure if you got from my initial post, that I was very pleased with you daughter's performance and public manner - I have two signed CDs from her, both presented with a smile to my daughter who wants to be just like her (watch out) Besides I think if F1 racing drivers can meet the public before and after a high concentration high stakes effort, surely musicians also can. If heart surgeons can meet the family before and after a four hour multiple bypass, surely musicians also can. I most certainly appreciate their PR efforts. I also have several Mutter CDs and two of her DVDs. I can always enjoy the music in the comfort of my home and even though many can't stand her interpretations, I welcome the diversity of expression. It is the complete lack of public acknowledgement at times, and not just by her, that gets me. Don't much care for the performer simply walking up playing, then disappearing for good. Everyone can play their part, not just lament about the declining influence of classical music on our youth of today!
  12. quote: Originally posted by: Melving My guess is that players like great athletes have to establish a special mindset to play at their peak...'get in the zone' so to speak.....Being 'in the zone' a state of deep focus and concentration and being personable might not always be possible for some people and transforming between the two states of mind might be a faster process for some than others. I think an audience should respect this, also that a musician should be allowed some space after a performance if they might need it. As for the green room...I could be wrong but I do think admitance should be by invitation only. Regards, M You do bring up a good point, thanks!
  13. quote: Originally posted by: Erika Have you tried the "green room"? Artists who don't come out to the main lobby are usually available back that way. It's much quieter and less frenzied than the main lobby. I never have, yet. But thanks for the suggestion Erika. If it is possible at all, I'll give it a shot. Although I was also commenting on the bigger picture regarding general performer PR...
  14. quote: Originally posted by: Ken Nielsen Hilary Hahn, obviously the result of a proper upbringing said, to a praising compliment, 'there are so many wonderful violinists.' Humility always has a way of placing a compliment back onto the originator. Hillary Hahn is very special!
  15. quote: Originally posted by: MrLucky ... still, as i said before, got to be good to be lucky. "Poppycock"! As Stradivarius demostrated, 'lucky' means squat, it is skill that consistently triumphs in the end
  16. Sure, took some 'luck' to turn this into a troll thread
  17. quote: Originally posted by: MrLucky i stand corrected. that's right...humility and martha. ...maybe MrNotSoLucky would better grasp the concept
  18. quote: Originally posted by: MrLucky that's right,,, humility and donald. You do realize I was using Trump as an example of the opposite...
  19. The recent reference to an article on Ann Sophie Mutter's poor performing attitude had me thinking.. I've somehow been avoiding performers who don't do encores or interact with the audience in anyway, sign CDs etc. Which is why I've thoroughly enjoyed performances by Nadia Salerno, Hillary Hahn, Julia Fischer(yes Dad, you can be proud)... I should add, I do a lot of this for my daughter. Believe me. While I've enjoyed witnessing for example the career of racing driver Michael Schumacher and attended Formula 1 races all over the world, I've never left my seat(except for or because of excess beer) for his autograph - or anyone else's. Julia seemed so eager to sign CDs, Hillary I've pestered so many times, recognizes me now either in the audience or in the line outside and doesn't even ask my daughter's name anymore, just starts writing On the other hand I've kind of had it with not just bland performances, but otherwise insipid behaviour. Can't make the time to smile at the audience, utter a humorous word or two, do an encore, sign a CD - why would I bother going, I probably already have their work on CD, or Heifetz's version I won't name names here. I'm not in the know about their professional contractual obligations to music labels, but pray someone tell me why an artist won't do more to engage the audience. Do the major music labels agressively strive to control all of the performer-public interaction, merchandising channels?
  20. quote: Originally posted by: Hank Schutz ...I think this is true, but largely culturally determined... ...These two great teachers probably account for our own estimation of humility as a virtue. .. You and others do have a valid point. I guess one can distinguish between a fond appreciation of and an appreciation without constraint. Probably explains to an extent why Trump's 'Apprentice' program is going strong, while Martha's tanked
  21. I sometimes get terribly depressed, even hostile, when I don't get enough credit for my Suzuki either. So I'm supposed to buy a Harley now? "Poppycock" I say. ...or maybe I'll quietly work on my Suzuki maintenance certification and show'em....
  22. A certain rather unpopular(or maybe popular) recent post, extolling some of the virtues of 'real musicians' over non, got me thinking about what we as humans look up to. Over a period of hundreds of years, one common trait appears to be a measure of humility that characterizes human greatness artistic or otherwise. This of course is a generalization, however, while in every profession one finds top performers, their appeal is more often than not boosted by an ostensible acceptance of their humble position in the grand scheme of things. An appreciation not only of their peers, but also of their counterparts in other professions, is clear as evidenced in many of the biggest names from Einstein to Perlman. Your opinions...
  23. quote: Originally posted by: falstaff Perhaps we should ask a few questions before offering up advice. I, for one, am a little unclear about the real scenario. So I would ask the following: 1) how old was the boy when he began Suzuki? 2) how soon after starting violin did he ask to stop? how long did he play under duress before stopping? 3) how old when he was allowed to stop and take up guitar? 4) how old was he when the "deal" was made to spend at least his Freshman year in high school in the orchestra? Thanks for asking some relevant questions before rushing with solutions...
  24. I always caution parents, to research and be aware of the difference, between violin players and real violin teachers.
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