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kapellmeister

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  1. Ever had a problem with sound adjustments being thrown off, Lymond?
  2. SF- yeah, I thought it might be so...but you never want to presume sarcasm, in case the person is actually serious...boy, have I made mistake in the past doing that! :-D
  3. HS, perhaps I am confused- do you mean to place one of those big ebony practice mutes ON the bridge when putting it in the case? It seems like that would only increase the height, making for MORE contact with the top of the violin case, and with that, more pressure on the bridge/violin top. I'm probably misreading something somewhere...could you clarify what you meant? Thanks!
  4. Skiingfiddler, thanks for your response. I'm hunting for a Superleggero, but they seemed to have all disappeared! Anyway, I'm glad to know that that strip of padding does not reach the bridge. Knowing that, when I look at the picture, that extra two inches (or so) of padding that extends beyond the big square pad seem pointless now. I originally thought it might be there to serve as padding for the bridge, but since I now know that it doesn't, it seems like a rather odd detail. Oh well...maybe the padding on the other Musafia cases is squishy enough to avoid any real problems with the bridge. Anybody know anything about the other Musafia dart-shaped cases? I posted this topic in the Fingerboard Forum as well (sorry for double posting, admins- just wanted to get some opinions from the player-side, as well as the luthier-side). It seems like most people aren't TOO concerned, although I have to agree with one of the poster's concerns about the padding affecting sound-adjustments. Just watching the minute bridge adjustments that my luthier performs makes me antsy about breathing on the bridge, much less pressing it with a violin case top, padded or not. Well, I suppose any good knock on the case is enough to knock the bridge out of that oh-so-perfect alignment, too. Thanks for all the replies...and for any future ones!
  5. Skiingfiddler, if I may ask, where and when did you get your Musafia Superleggeros cases? Also, does your case look like this: http://www.musafia.com/S2012RbeigeB.jpg ? I notice that there is a piece of padding extending a few inches beyond the big square pad that touches the chinrest and hold the violin in place. I'm wondering if this piece of padding is not in your two cases, or if they are, if they just don't extend far enough to reach the bridge. From the picture, it seems like it would, but maybe not so...
  6. Having looked at many Musafia cases recently, I can't help but notice that every (used) case that I have seen always has a "bridge line" on the top padding, where the bridge has rubbed against the top half of the case. Now, from what I understand about "suspension" cases (the Musafia cases included), the point of the "suspension system" is to avoid impact directly on the back of the violin, if the bottom of the case is hit. The suspension system has padding (roughly) around the upper block and lower block of the violin, in an effort to keep the majority of violin back "suspended" above the actual case back. Getting to the million-dollar question: These suspension systems are designed to have the major contact points be around what I consider to be the "strong" parts of the violin. Now, suppose the violin case back is struck- theoretically, the suspension padding will transmit almost all of the impact to the two blocks and the areas where the padding touches the back of the violin. However, since the crucial, delicate areas (eg. the soundpost area) are not directly touching the back of the case, the impact should not be felt greatly in these areas (once again, theoretically-speaking). Now, since I have always noticed these "bridge lines" on the padding on the top half of the case (to be specific, the strip of padding that runs length-wise over the violin and carries the brass Musafia label), I assume that means that the top of the case directly touches the bridge. Quite firmly, too, if the bridge rubs hard enough through the blanket to create the "bridge line" impression on the padding. The million dollar question: The bridge, and where it touches on the violin top, are obviously very delicate parts of the violin. Now, since the bridge touches the top of the case, if the top of the case is struck, won't the bridge (and therefore, the soundpost/bass bar areas of the violn top) absorb the impact directly? I have been told that it is good to have the padding around the bridge, in order to protect it. But, given how the suspension system works to protect the back, it seems rather counterintuitive to have the top of the case be DIRECTLY touching the bridge for protection purposes. Am I being paranoid? Fellow violinists, have you ever had a problem with your bridges/soundposts area/etc being damaged in Musafia cases?
  7. Having looked at many Musafia cases recently, I can't help but notice that every (used) case that I have seen always has a "bridge line" on the top padding, where the bridge has rubbed against the top half of the case. Now, from what I understand about "suspension" cases (the Musafia cases included), the point of the "suspension system" is to avoid impact directly on the back of the violin, if the bottom of the case is hit. The suspension system has padding (roughly) around the upper block and lower block of the violin, in an effort to keep the majority of violin back "suspended" above the actual case back. Getting to the million-dollar question: These suspension systems are designed to have the major contact points be around what I consider to be the "strong" parts of the violin. Now, suppose the violin case back is struck- theoretically, the suspension padding will transmit almost all of the impact to the two blocks and the areas where the padding touches the back of the violin. However, since the crucial, delicate areas (eg. the soundpost area) are not directly touching the back of the case, the impact should not be felt greatly in these areas (once again, theoretically-speaking). Now, since I have always noticed these "bridge lines" on the padding on the top half of the case (to be specific, the strip of padding that runs length-wise over the violin and carries the brass Musafia label), I assume that means that the top of the case directly touches the bridge. Quite firmly, too, if the bridge rubs hard enough through the blanket to create the "bridge line" impression on the padding. The million dollar question: The bridge, and where it touches on the violin top, are obviously very delicate parts of the violin. Now, since the bridge touches the top of the case, if the top of the case is struck, won't the bridge (and therefore, the soundpost/bass bar areas of the violn top) absorb the impact directly? I have been told that it is good to have the padding around the bridge, in order to protect it. But, given how the suspension system works to protect the back, it seems rather counterintuitive to have the top of the case be DIRECTLY touching the bridge for protection purposes. Am I being paranoid? Luthiers, is the bridge touching the top of the case a big concern for Musafia cases?
  8. Anybody out there study with (or have any experiences with) this teacher/violin soloist? I know he's a pretty big thing at New England Conservatory, and I'm thinking about studying him this summer or next year. I'm hoping that somebody on this board will be able to offer a few comments or general advice about him-particularly about his nature as a teacher. Thanks-KM
  9. Just wondering-anybody out there have any experience with this string? Does it actually prevent whistling? Or is it a cop-out answer for poor bow control ? Please post if you've tried it out/know anything about it. Thanks- KM
  10. Pablo Casals made some lovely noises on his own recordings, actually. I've heard his Schumann where he basically moans in the introduction...must have been quite exciting for him.
  11. With regards to deStaunton's comments: Yes, a violin by Michael Darnton, or any priced violin, for that matter, could be adequate for a professional. However, I tend to agree with Roman on his statement that a "professional violin is more than 10K". Perhaps a better way to phrase this, would be to say that a great number of professionals play instruments greater than 10K. I'm not bashing modern violins, or violins under 10K, by no means, but I think it wouldn't be a stretch to say that the majority of professionals play >10K violins. With regards to Maxtheviolinist's original dilemma: I would recommend recording yourself playing, and listening afterwards. Perhaps what you would consider "airy" or even "scratchy" is a better tone than you though, at a distance. Or, you could find out by listening what aspect really suffers, be it scratchy bow changes, or just over-pressure, in general. My 2 cents! Thanks- KM
  12. I believe that the ex-Kubelik Strad was never owned by Stern...someone correct me if I am wrong, please! At least, the Kubelik Strad presented by Tarisio is not part of Stern's estate. It is being sold on behalf of "a North American university", to quote Tarisio's website. To my best knowledge, Stern was one of those "Guarneri" soloists...hence his Zyg copies of the Vicomte de Panette and Ysaye, both of which he owned (and presently are being presented by Tarisio). My two cents! Thanks- KM
  13. A couple ideas: for the fingers, have him play with a octagonal pencil. He should practice just holding it with the tips of his fingers (fingers fully extended), and then lifting it up vertically, bending the knuckles and finger joints only, without moving his wrist. It's hard to explain well, but if you would like further clarification, I can try to explain it better. On the subject of listening, perhaps you should ask him to record himself while practicing, and listen later. I know that it's not the same as listening while playing, but it's a start on the right path. My 2 cents, thanks! - KM
  14. The fifth section of the Lalo may be more difficult technically than the Mendelssohn, but I personally think the Mendelssohn is harder in general. Certainly musically, but also technically speaking. It's harder to play the Mendelssohn cleanly than many people believe. My suggestion is the Conus concerto, or maybe Wieniawski 2. Wieniawski 2 might be a stretch, but it's definitely a romantic concerto, and it has many plusses. My 2 cents! Thanks- KM
  15. Just wondering...How did the Storioni and Gagliano sound? -KM
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