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brontosaurous

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Everything posted by brontosaurous

  1. Would it be as dark as the SAS walnut? http://www.viva-sas.com/images/large_chin2.jpg From the pictures on Dov's site, tetul appears a little more reddish-brown. Does the actual product look similar to this? http://www.dov-music.com/proddetail.asp?prod=7206 Google tells me tetul is the Bengali translation for tamarind.
  2. Hi everyone, I am looking around for a good set of fittings to replace the ebony ones I currently have on my violin. Having more or less ruled out the likes of Bois d'Harmonie and B&C for reasons of cost, I think I'll go with the ones made by Dov Schmidt. His catalogue is available at http://www.dov-music.com/catalog.asp. He's got a couple of interesting wood species which we don't see around too often - tetul and crabwood. Does anyone know how these woods are aesthetically and acoustically? The tetul looks tremendously attractive - quite like pernambuco actually; it's also harder than ebony. At this point, I'm tossing up between boxwood and tetul, so it'd be good to hear what you all know about tetul. As for the crabwood, I'm inclined to think it's the equivalent of the datewood that is often used in the place of boxwood on many lower-end fiddles. He tells me the wood is from the Himalayan mountains. I'm not really considering crabwood at all. I must admit these fittings of his do look very nice, and they're reasonably priced. He tells me they're handmade by a good maker from India. Hear soon! Cheers, Keith
  3. I'm not sure if this is the article you were talking about, but a Google search has just revealed a few paragraphs on Peter Purich! Sounds interesting to me. Go to http://members.aol.com/julielyonn/violinist3.html Then, press Ctrl+F and find "purich".
  4. This sounds awfully interesting. I'd be keen to know!
  5. I am definitely no expert in lutherie, but I have heard that Peresson's violins tend to be prone to this. Now that might be a wrong view of these fiddles, but this is simply what I have heard from what are actually some rather influential players indeed. Never personally heard or played one, though, so I am far from qualified to make any sort of judgement. Just me 2 cents worth.
  6. Oh, doesn't music have lots of these? =) Gewandehaus is one that baffles many. I understand it's meant to be pronounced as Ge-van-da-house (van as in car and not can, if you know what I'm trying to say)! Before I heard it being mentioned on television, I'd always thought it was something like Goo-ven-house or Gay-ven-house. 'Tis strange!
  7. I personally reckon that Beethoven's greatest symphony is the 7th. It's just so elegant and cheerful. Not the most popular, perhaps (although it does have its own faithful following), but certainly one of THE most beautiful pieces in all of music.
  8. brontosaurous

    Tarisio

    The list isn't too comprehensive in May, is it?
  9. Yep, the cost is unbearable for me. I was hugely interested in them for a while, and then I heard how much they'd cost!
  10. Imagine if it was real! Aren't Lupots the most expensive French violins? Some resource I was looking at said so, though I'd always thought Vuillaumes were more valuable. I'd certainly choose a good Vuillaume del Gesu copy over a Lupot, but hey I'd take either any day.
  11. I find the one on the left, the older one, so thoughtful and poignant. To me, that is a beautiful image of a musician living his music through and through!
  12. I don't mind good contemporary music that has at least a thematic melody to present. Corigliano's Red Violin stuff was very good, for instance. There is a particular tendency to do lots of repetition however, especially in contemporary orchestral works. I hate that! As far as solo music for the violin goes, I think Corigliano has to be the best. There is also an Australian work by Ross Edwards that is wonderful - the Maninyas Violin Concerto.
  13. You'd have to wait a fine period for one of Zygmuntowicz's fiddles, though!
  14. On the contrary, I feel a case SHOULD have ample storage space, as that's incredibly useful for music scores, your metronome, a shoulder rest (if you use one), etc. How much one uses should be entirely up to the individual, but you'd want a case with lots of pocket space.
  15. Incidentally, I have heard some talk before that Peresson's violins often had overthin tops, and while they sounded absolutely phenomenal in their first few years, they really dropped back severely after that. How true is that, and if so, why are Peressons still commanding their fairly hefty price tag? By the way, these comments came from some very illustrious violinists that were in the very highest echelons of the London orchestral scene back when Peresson lived ~ in the 1970s. Any comments, folks?
  16. Yes, I find the entire situation a bit beyond me, really.
  17. You know, I hate to say this since someone did pay that hefty an amount for this violin, but I reckon nobody would actually place anywhere near that much for the fiddle if it had just been placed on auction along with a description like "Good violin from 1920s". I wonder how many of those people who bid such high amounts for it actually contacted the seller to try the violin out.
  18. Whereabouts in Australia, mate? You can get in touch with me privately by email, if that's going to be more convenient.
  19. Is there ever some sort of violin show, or at least an auction or a tour or something, that occurs here in Sydney or in other parts of Australia? Somehow, I doubt it, and that's just plain disappointing! If only Tarisio would come down here for a bit...
  20. I believe that's one of those Playonair rests in action there. Great pic!
  21. I use Teka and have a huge "violin hickey"! Still like it, though. I find it sets my chin at just where I would like it to be. I'll live with anything, so long as I keep producing decent music!
  22. I'm not sure if I'm the best person to comment on Gringolts' playing, but I really wouldn't take Bach like Paganini. To me, Bach is about creating that secondary atmosphere that you don't quite get with many other works. It should be soulful and almost prayer-like. That's what Bach represents for me, and I try to convey that to any audience to whom I'm playing.
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