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linuxviolin

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Everything posted by linuxviolin

  1. You've got to try it with piano to truly appreciate it- some of the stuff is really spectacular. I say it's a pity R. Clarke didn't write more stuff for violists to enjoy
  2. Yeah, I forgot about those, which I was going to do for my concert until I found out about Rebecca Clarke. I really don't like the idea of violinists stealing viola repertoire- esp. Marchenbilder- but let's add one more violist to the ranks that plays that wonderful piece.
  3. Arpeggione first and second mvts. are not hard at all. All they take is a nice tone and a Viennese style (which a good teacher should be able to help you with). I learned it in about 7 weeks with a break during week 5 while at camp two summers ago, and I find so many opportunities to play it... the same, unfortunately, cannot be said about Shostakovitch If you're unsure about Arpeggione, Bruch Romance is a great choice. If you want some easier twentieth century stuff, Hovhaness wrote some really pretty viola music. I'm playing "Chahagir" as the opening piece- my concert is a benefit to raise funds to record a Hovhaness four-hand piano concerto.
  4. How dangerous is it to play on a violin with a fairly open seam? My mother needs hers, so it's back to mine. The seam is located between the back and the ribs, directly underneath the button, and spreads for about an inch on each side. I can get it to a luthier tomorrow evening, but I have a lesson tomorrow afternoon that's my last until January.
  5. Agreed on that- it's going on my viola concert in Feb., along with Shosty Op. 147 and Rebecca Clarke- two works you might consider if you want something more modern.
  6. In my last orchestra (which I quit because I wanted my Monday nights back, they raised the rates yet again, and the drive was unfair to my mother), we did Eroica in four rehearsals and I didn't hear any complaints. If you've got three months, I don't see any problem.
  7. "Maybe less hours = less sleep needed = more time for life" Hmm.. my day exactly.. four hours of sleep last night, left soon after getting up, two stops to change clothes, and I got back a little while ago now. All I want for Christmas is a nice day of rest, without a lesson to prepare for the next Monday I guess the most painful gift most teachers have received is unprepared students
  8. Ahh... now I understand that Bach's handwriting is rather unpredictable- the '1' sure looks different in the Partita than the Sonata.
  9. No, the facsimile manuscript in the back of the Galamian/IMC edition says "Sonata G ma a Violino Solo senza Basso," which means "Sonata in g minor for violin solo without accompaniment," right?
  10. Hi, a sound post adjustment can certainly do many things to your instrument- including increase volume. Pirazzi's are nice and loud, and are relatively warm- not as warm as obligatos, though.
  11. Maybe I've had too many lessons- every time I go to the post office in the summer the postmistress says how much she enjoys hearing me play when she walks the dog during lunch (doesn't work in the winter because the windows are usually closed).
  12. It is odd, but the first chord of the Adagio is a g minor chord, and there are a good many e flat accidentals throughout- so the feeling is one of g minor, not of F Major or d minor. My Barenreiter edition says something interesting on accidentals: "The main divergence from the original notation is in the placing of accidentals, and here modern usage has been adopted. As against Bach's practice, accidentals are valid for the whole bar; non-essential ones have not been repeated within a bar, and only where confusion could arise (e.g. because of the melodic line or octave relationships) have such accidentals been kept." Also, maybe the rules weren't so finalized then as they are now.
  13. When I do metronome practice (which is actually quite often) I set it to beat at the beginning of the measure when my main point is to improve my understanding of the rhythm while playing at tempo. If I'm playing drastically slower (i.e. half tempo, quarter tempo, etc.) I'll have the metronome half the measure, quarter it, etc.
  14. well... my teacher said at a quartet coaching that he wears t-shirts with front pockets so that he could put pencils in there- I'm thinking of getting him a pocket protector
  15. Yep, I'm studying with James Stern now who's at Maryland- I can't stand the school, esp. the 75 mi. each way drive to it, but he's one of the greatest thinkers I've ever met, and I feel I've improved so much in the year and a half I've studied with him.
  16. I've studied with Charlie Castleman the past two summers at Quartet Program (his camp)... The lessons are just amazing- he's an extremely fast thinker so everything moves very quickly, and we got a lot accomplished in even an hour, and I always left wishing the lesson had lasted much, much longer. Now, for top teachers of beginners, I'll have to nominate my mother, who is quite an inspiration to all the little chilluns in her studio.
  17. If you aren't planning to do anything extremely fancy (i.e. roll your own pro recordings that you plan to sell commercially) you can get a Turtle Beach Santa Cruz for about 65 bucks. I payed about $75 last year for mine, and it's really stable, partially due to being out for quite a while. If you want to spend a bit more, I guess you could consider another consumer brand- Creative's Audigy2- but I wouldn't touch them with a ten-foot pole just because I don't really care for Creative's stability that much. And I have made CD's for sale with my Santa Cruz.
  18. I used boxwood for a while, and kept having to have the pegs refitted. My violin sounds just fine with rosewood, so you might try that.
  19. How to cook a conductor: The ingredients: 1 conductor or two assistant conductors (avoid conductors laureate- they're too old and tough), 2 large cloves of garlic, 1 tub lard or vegetable shortening, 1 keg cheap wine, 2 lbs assorted vegetables, and 4 lbs tofu. Upon capture, remove the tail and horns. Carefully separate the large ego and refrigerate for the sauce. Discard any batons, scores, pencils, etc. Clean the conductor as you would a squid. After removing the slime and the inner organs (mostly large intestines), tenderize it on a rock witha strong pounding motion. Marinate it in a bathtub using half a keg of cheap wine. (No point in wasting the good stuff). Exception: conductors from France or Italy. Also, Canadian, German, and Australian conductors tend to have a beery aroma. Use your own discretion when choosing how to marinate them. When sufficiently soaked, remove the outside clothing and rub the complete surface area with garlic. Apply all of the lard over the whole body. Place in a pan with the vegetables surrounding it. Cover and cook on high until lightly flamed. When done, invite all members of the orchestra over for dinner and serve with the remaining wine. Sauce: combine the ego, seasonings, and lots of ketchup in a blender and puree until liquified. Heat and serve.
  20. The Audio Technica AT822 is about $220 from B&H (I haven't done any price comparison, but they've always been good to me), uses a mini connector- so you can just connect it to your computer's mic-in (or MD mic-in, etc.), and it's really high quality.
  21. yeah, should have known you'd say Szeryng/Rubenstein. And here's me unable to produce a single recording of it- though I do have four recordings of Kreisler and Rachmaninoff playing Op. 30 No. 3 (no. 8)- I have a feeling that two are the same, but two of them are on the same CD. I did hear the Kreutzer sonata live with Anne-Sophie Mutter a few years ago, and have heard recordings of it (and probably live, not to mention looked over the music) fairly recently.
  22. Yes, it is. So, have you been playing it, or do you have a really good recording you'd like to share the name of?
  23. There's Audacity And Goldwave is free if you don't mind pop-ups after 150 commands, then you have to restart the program again.
  24. I'm just assuming it's the most expensive violin I've played, and it was the Zimbalist Guarneri, but I can't remember how it compares.
  25. You forgot one important group- ambidextrous
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