difrangia

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About difrangia

  • Rank
    Member
  • Birthday 06/05/1948

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  • Gender
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  • Location
    OKlahoma
  • Interests
    violin/fiddle refurbishment, vintage microcars, military sidearms, local history (manager of local museum)
  1. Interesting read. https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/samuel-stochek-violins?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=atlas-page
  2. I have a Taig micro-lathe that I'll be setting up with a taper attachment to turn pegs.
  3. As FiddleDoug posted above, First skills need to be sharpening, adjusting, & fine tuning the various tools used in the craft. One can view the effort as a task or, preferably, as an opportunity to become intimately acquainted with the tools needed to accomplish desired goals. I actually get more satisfaction from building, rebuilding, zeroing in, and building a relationship with the tools that I use in violin repair or any of the other endeavors that I undertake. As with many things in life, tools can be allies or foes. Steve
  4. Maybe something in here would be of use nt. http://www.maestronet.com/forum/index.php?/topic/325816-burning-bridges/?hl=branding#entry538818
  5. Addendum to previous post: Made from bits & pieces laying about the shop. Brass ink-pen tube & spring & a piece of piano wire. Short piece of steel tubing for spring seat and a clip of heat-shrink tubing to keep the post-claw captured in the tube. The knob is a piece of plastic rod scrap. Works well enough for me that I plan on a few possible design changes when I get some spare time. Steve
  6. A couple of photos of my 'country boy tinkerer' remedy for the frustrations of mastering the conventional postsetter. Also used to retrieve the post from the violin body. I use the heavy conventional setter (Herdim, I think) to hammer, push, & pull the post around once it's standing. Steve
  7. Craig, I'd guess that what probably intrigues me to a great degree is how early this is in the lineage of the violin as we know it. Also, it appears that from what is on the Cozio site, the instrument has not been very accessible for inspection over time which, along with its travels over the centuries, adds to the mystery for me. Something akin to the lore of the Hubermann, Messiah, and Red Diamond Stradavari instruments. Maybe it's just eye candy to a novice, and not so impressive to more experienced violinistas, but I've always been enamored of the Brescian double-purfle instruments. Steve
  8. I've always been intrigued by the carving on the Gasparo Da Salo 'Jewel Room' violin. Photos from Cozio. http://www.cozio.com/Instrument.aspx?id=243 Steve
  9. Looks like a tied up roast. Reminds me of my optometrist telling me about one of his tours in Europe. He works on vintage clocks as a hobby. Takes an occasional pipe organ tour in Europe on which historic organs are visited, played by professionals, and by the tour participants. He said he visited a site dedicated to Mendelsshon. Maybe a residence of the composer? The story was that in hard times the original hand written manuscripts of Mendelsshon's compositions were being used to wrap meat at a butcher shop. At least some of the ones rescued were displayed at the memorial location. Imagine getting your roast home, unwrapping it to cook, and there on your supper is the reconstituted ink of timeless classical music; in reverse. Try playing summa that. Steve
  10. Anytime I pick up an older instrument (50+ years old), even before an eye scan, a quick nose scan of the 'F' holes is mandatory. Another sample is taken at various stages of a refurbishment. An old German Da Salo copy of mine, and one of my favorites, has the most entrancing aroma of any that I've experienced. Not for everyone. Steve
  11. I first made up the wood peg rounder after thinking the process out a bit wanting to speed up the process a little. Built the wooden one first and used the tapered peg reamer inserted through the hole in the end opposite the end with the beveled outside diameter to ream a taper to seat the peg in. Then glued the dowel rod in to spin the contraption with. Slip the peg into the taper through the side slot and press into the taper with the end protruding after the excess is trimmed close to finish length. Then support the jig close to the protruding peg with one hand and spin the jig by the dowel with the other hand while rocking the peg end against the 1" wide belt sander. Attain finish length and radius, then finish with several increasingly finer grades of sandpaper laid on the thigh or mousepad if preferred. Finish on the buffing wheel with compound. After a bit of tinkering and a decent degree of satisfaction with the procedure, I could see the limitation in that the variation in peg diameters between instruments would necessitate having a range of these jigs with varying tapers, so I came up with the PVC contraption. There is a soft rubber bushing in the end that the peg protrudes from. The inner sleeve compresses the bushing when the knurled knob above the body is tightened griping the peg and centering it. The rounding process is the same as for the wooden rounding jig. May seem like a complicated process for a simple task, but after the pegs are cut to a pretty close finish length, I can round and polish a set of four pegs in ten minutes or less. That includes loading in and out of the jig several times for each peg to get to the exact length. Works for Planetarys too. Photo included of finished and installed pegs. Steve
  12. I first made up the wood peg rounder after thinking the process out a bit wanting to speed up the process a little. Built the wooden one first and used the tapered peg reamer inserted through the hole in the end opposite the end with the beveled outside diameter to ream a taper to seat the peg in. Then glued the dowel rod in to spin the contraption with. Slip the peg into the taper through the side slot and press into the taper with the end protruding after the excess is trimmed close to finish length. Then support the jig close to the protruding peg with one hand and spin the jig by the dowel with the other hand while rocking the peg end against the 1" wide belt sander. Attain finish length and radius, then finish with several increasingly finer grades of sandpaper laid on the thigh or mousepad if preferred. Finish on the buffing wheel with compound. After a bit of tinkering and a decent degree of satisfaction with the procedure, I could see the limitation in that the variation in peg diameters between instruments would necessitate having a range of these jigs with varying tapers, so I came up with the PVC contraption. There is a soft rubber bushing in the end that the peg protrudes from. The inner sleeve compresses the bushing when the knurled knob above the body is tightened griping the peg and centering it. The rounding process is the same as for the wooden rounding jig. May seem like a complicated process for a simple task, but after the pegs are cut to a pretty close finish length, I can round and polish a set of four pegs in ten minutes or less. That includes loading in and out of the jig several times for each peg to get to the exact length. Works for Planetarys too. Photo included of finished and installed pegs. Steve
  13. BINGO !!! Lots of sinister stuff going on behind the curtain and a bit over half the populace is mesmerized by the flash & dazzle on the illuminated side of the curtain; re.Survivor, Idol, DWTS, sh1tcoms, etc, ad-naseum. Nuff o' that blather. Back to the instruments. Always an escape there.
  14. In case anyone might be interested. http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/08/06/gibson-guitar-settles-claim-over-imported-ebony/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0 http://www.americanthinker.com/printpage/?url=http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2014/02/what_gibson_guitars_did_with_the_wood_the_government_returned.html Steve