alemap

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  1. alemap

    Wanda Landowska

    The only thing I can suggest outside of death records is befriending somebody polish to do a polish website search and see if anything you don't know turns up. She didn't move to the US until 1941 and won't show up in available census for 10 years so that option is out. Research at the Mormon's Family history library might find something. you can try www.familyhistory.org All information there has to be verified but it can be a good starting place. Don't forget spelling variations -- I have one family line that I have found spelt 40 different ways ( usually spelling errors from transcribing hand written records)and sometimes just an evolution of a name. For instance I found this record. No way of knowing the verity of the information without checking the actual file submission ( you can get them on microfilm) 05 JUL 1879 Warszawa, Warszawskiego, Poland Christening: Death: 16 AUG 1959 Burial: Parents: Father: MARIAN LANDOWSKI Family Mother: EWA LAUTENBERG Keep searching --eventually something will jump out at you. ~Pam
  2. 2 1/2 years..... No method really - started with Letourneau and did some Suzuki repertoire but haven't touched that for about a year. Handel E Major sonata -- here and there when we have time. Lots of short sight reading exercises in positions instead of etudes at the present moment. Toselli's Serenade for my year end solo all the 3 octave major and minor scales and arps Josephine Trott's melodious Double Stops tons of repertoire for ensemble and orchestra - something like 40 pages - groan !! ~Pam
  3. You can save your noteworthy file as a midi file. If its just for listening purposes you can upload the file to a website - provide a link and they can listen to it that way. You can email the file then to the person. If you need them to actually see the sheetmusic then they could download the free version of noteworthy and look at it from there. The only annoying thing about that is the free version prints a non registered copy version thing at the bottom of each line. Another way would be to print the music yourself - scan it and send it to the person. Hope that helps. ~Pam
  4. Its Friday -- my lesson day !! so recently I have been studying a lot of Emajor stuff -- scales major and E minor - Kreutzer 8 and Handel's E Major Sonata and a whole huge pile of other repertoire in various keys. I have only been playing for 2 years and a few months and one of my main problems have been the first to fourth finger reaches on the E string and A string -- the other two were always ok. Somehow while practicing the super big stretch on the G string to the D# and all the sharp third fingers on the G D and A my two string 1 4 reaches have amazingly resolved themselves.... I am so happy !! and to boot I made a D string shift from the low e up an octave and back down to F# on the same bow with a trill and nailed it today -- personally I think it was accidental but I got a small round of applause from my teacher. It was my first first to fifth shift I do so love leaping the hurdles !! Pam
  5. We also musn't forget Perlman has huge hands. If you watch the very opening part of the program just where Perlman starts to talk -- you can see that both his thumbs are quite curved out from the joint. I think because of the size of his hands this probably isn't a problem for him -- I found it quite noticeable in the shifts as well -- where in my small hand my thumb is way under at third and fourth -- he almost has to move his out of the way backwards it seems or he is too far away from the fingerboard. Pam
  6. Do a web search for the words pilates and bands. This is the link to the set I have -- I use the upper body portion of the work out for my warmup. Pilates can be done without bands as well -- all sorts of info on the net about it. http://www.innergifts.com/pages/ms_yoga/pi...workout-kit.htm Tai Chi could be worth looking into -- again do a websearch -- tons of information on the net about it.
  7. Well I can only answer 1 & 2 -- will leave the others for somebody else to chime in on 1. Yes I warm up for 15 minutes before I start practicing -- pilate's band stretches to be exact. 2. I am also very physically tense, you could try tai chi, yoga or possibly looking into Alexander Technique instruction. If you're like me a book won't do I need somebody to show me where I am tense. Pam
  8. Right I didn't think it was really gut core but you can see where the confusion comes in for sure. The label perpetuating the idea that they are gut.
  9. I was wondering about this as well as I just saw the cover package of one last Thursday and I am fairly certain it said Pirastro Olive Gold 'gut core' E on it.
  10. Thanks for posting the clip -- its great
  11. I would suggest you listen to Andrew Manze's or Rachel Podgers CD's and pick one from there based on the one you think you could do the most interpretative justice too. I can't personally suggest one because I really don't know the individual difficulties of each one but I do think there is lots of room to really do justice to the baroque style -- like somebody replied in another thread recently easy to play the notes not too easy to make them sound like what they were meant to sound like. Also search around on the net and see if you can find reviews and such to see what is thought about each of them. Pam
  12. Watch it again -- he's in there !! Interview segment in Russian.
  13. That's very fast progress -- the Handel D Major is definitely an intermediate level piece a tempo in the second and fourth movements. Pam
  14. I think Ms. Haendel still performs a few times a year -- I saw her recently here in Montreal. She was pretty impressive for someone in her late seventies. She was originally supposed to perform the Sibelius but the program was changed because the the Dutoit fiasco. I think most of her skill is still there -- she played the Bruch and I think she might have left a few double stops go but I doubt the general audience noticed. For her encore Ida played her own arrangement of the' notoriously difficult' cadenza and Danse Russe from Swan Lake. Good concert. Pam
  15. "It is simple as that. Mr Olivares projects better than that guy at the Emerson quartet." Right -- that's probably the semblance of the whole truth !!! ~Pam