Swing Monkey 1

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About Swing Monkey 1

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    Junior Member
  • Birthday 06/21/1954

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    Male
  • Location
    Oakland, Ca.

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  1. I have had both the Luis & Clark violin and the German Mezzo-Forte. I just wanted to try something different and bought the L&C and thought it would be a good "outside" violin. This was to be a secondary instrument and not in any way to replace my primary fiddle. IMHO the L&C was a much better sounding instrument than the MF. In fact my main objection to keeping the L&C was I really disliked the carbon fiber fingerboard and neck. I sold the L&C and bought a MF, choosing the one with the wood finger board. It was RIDDLED with wolf and false tones, in all of the registers. A total deal breaker. I returned it and had to jump through many hoops to get my money back.
  2. " Virtuosos of present and past ". Stephane Grappelli. Not really a classical, but a relaxed player, who know his way around the fingerboard and played without a shoulder rest.
  3. The wall of a dumpster?
  4. I have a 1943 J.R. Carlisle, # 1142, with a completely handmade label with thumbprint. It is a very formidable violin, a deep reddish orange, one piece back and is the Guarneri model. It is incredibly resonate and has a deep and very focused sound. IMHO I think this is one of the 75 or so masterpieces and completely made by his hand. So far this has been my favorite instrument, even more than some more illustrious and expensive fiddles.
  5. I had a high end Arcus and it was too light and flimsy for me and I sold it. I have a Berg Bow now, which I believe is some kind of composite. for me, personally, I like it better than the Arcus, it handles great, but stiill does not sound as good as my two pernambuco bows. It is a great dependable, practice, travel bow though.
  6. I am one who appreciates the price of a violin up front. It seems that in matters of business the details should be as transparent as possible.
  7. I have a 1943 J.R. Carlisle, # 1142, with a completely handmade label with thumbprint. It is a very formidable violin, a deep reddish orange, one piece back and is the Guarneri model. It is incredibly resonate and has a deep and very focused sound. IMHO I think this is one of the 75 or so masterpieces and completely made by his hand.
  8. This would seem to go down the path towards the common place/Facebook and such. Please keep the integrity of the Site, without "popular opinion" and such measures.
  9. Heifetz kept a full glass of water in the cabinet in his studio where he kept his violin.
  10. IMHO this is a ridiculously, hideous looking fiddle. But, then everyone has their own tastes.
  11. Dean said, "I've had, and still have Dominants that are 5+ YO, I don't notice any problems." I notice you live in the S.F. Bay area where I live. I agree that isn't as much as an issue in the environment here with very, very low humidity, where strings tend to last longer. When I am back east in Ohio, strings are impacted more detrimentally by the wicked summer humidity and seasonal changes, on violins in play and also strings in storage. I am sure strings last a lot longer in Phoenix than in New York.
  12. You could always place your thumb print on the label like James Reynold Carlisle, from Cincinnati.
  13. All of the above violinist are indeed worthy, however if they all played the same work, how many people could tell who was who? Heifetz stood apart with his own sound. I think Stephane Grappelli should be considered due to his creativity, uniqueness, and being instantly recognizable. Even Menuhin admired his talent.
  14. It seems Stephane Grappelli continued to became more refined as he aged. His peak IMO, in his mid seventy's..