FenwickG

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  1. To fill the chip and not have it as shiny as a repair using ebony dust (which I never use) and ca glue, I use an ebony crumble. The crumble I use with good results is made from the shavings left over from shaping a peg . Over fill the chip with ebony crumble, cover it with a bit of cling wrap, apply finger pressure to the wrap and crumble and soak it with ca glue. Now you can file the repair to shape and finish the repair. With crumble you get more wood product in the chip and not as much ca glue as you get using dust which makes it shine. The crack can be glued together by pressing it together and using a good quality ca glue after removing the pearl slide. For both repairs clean the chip and crack with acetone to remove any oils or waxes.
  2. Take a small scraping from the bottom of the mortise, put it in a few drops of water. If the water turns pink you likely have pernambuco.
  3. I prefer #1. The grain seems more dense on the head than #2.
  4. I just had two taps made to fit the coarse threads on many of the old German trade bows. Taylor tools manufactured them, a M3x80 and a 5x30. They weren't cheap but I seem to run into a lot of these threads enough to warrent the expense.
  5. Acetone will dissolve the ca glue.
  6. I have dismantled a piano. Far too much work for the usable wood harvested. The soundboard spruce is too thin to be of much use, but the braces on the soundboard would make nice bass bars. The 3x3 wood used on the frame was full of knots under the finish, but I have seen nice clear wood used on newer pianos for these parts. The only wood that was usable to me was the board that went across the back for lifting turned out to be willow. And the metal harp and strings are heavy and a pain to get rid of.
  7. There is Baxter's database that catalogs a whole host of makers. I see that you can get it on Amazon. The person (Baxter ?) used to post here as Fubbi2.
  8. It is called the Alberti Frog Eyelet Fixture and the cost for a violin, cello,and bass fixture with all the drills and bushings is $385.00.
  9. Alberti Design has a tool for installing and repairing broken eyelets. It makes both jobs easier and very precise.
  10. In a small pill cup put a few drops of water. Take a narrow chisel and scrape a very minute shaving from the bottom of the mortise. It only needs to be about one to one and a half mm by 1/4mm and drop it in the water. Pernambuco will turn the water pink shortly, other woods that I have tried have had no effect or at best turn it a yellowish tint.
  11. It is called a butt lap. (no snickering please). To keep the balance about the same use a very thin piece of leather. The stuff I use is from some sort of sea snake. I glue a piece of scotch tape that just covers the brand to protect it and use Titebond glue on the leather.
  12. This is an interesting project. Since I play a washtub bass, which by the way is a lot of fun, one problem I see is that your bridge is located next to the rim instead of in the center where the most resonance is. I think your sound is going to be thin and bright, not full. Perhaps eliminate the tailpiece and bridge and attach your strings to the center of the tub. My bass has only one string but there is no reason that you can't attach them in an arc to duplicate the bridge.
  13. I think you are right David. Wiping off the edge of the tip should remove them.
  14. This is a bone tip plate and some bone can be quite porous. I coat bone tip plates with super glue to fill the pores when I am finishing them, otherwise I get black specks like these when I am polishing them with micro mesh.