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robertdo

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Everything posted by robertdo

  1. It's true that guitars are mostly individual intruments, but I am pretty sure they are older than violins
  2. I think, but of course it's only an opinion, that selling 1/32 "advanced" violins for 1-3 years old children is like selling an "advanced" low speed electron collider to lay people in the hope that one of them will discover a new physic law think that most of the greatest violin players started taking violin lesson between 5 and 7, probably with no less than a 1/4 violin (or even larger)...
  3. robertdo

    violin id?

    there is also a Francois fourier Nicolas (from a family of luthiers) who was a french luthier for the royal school. He was born in Mirecourt in 1758 and died in Paris in 1816. He was a Luthier at the "rue Croix des Petits Champs around 1800. I read that some of his violins had the inscription "Nicolas a Paris" burnt on the lower bout rib near the button on the bass side. In any case it's a very nice looking violin, with flowing curves, and although I am no expert it seems as old as many other violins shown here. 200 years is not that old all else considered.
  4. I guess most adults comfortably play violin with a standard size bow and don't even ask themselves if they could do with shorter (or indeed longer) one.
  5. One should also remember that the size of the arms is not exactly correlated to the total size.
  6. the late genius M. Petrucciani was indeed playing a "demi-queue" piano, about 2m instead of about 3m for a standard size one. Many adults also need a 7/8 violin, and I guess there is no reason not to use slightly shorter bow if necessary.
  7. robertdo

    violin id?

    I suppose it's a copy of a Nicolas Lupot violin, although I have just read that N. Lupot founded the school at this address only in 1806.
  8. robertdo

    Center join

    that is right of course. You can indeed make many measurements and get an average thickness at microns level. What I meant really was that if you make your measurements and get one value, it's difficult for someone else to use another meachine (vernier against micrometer for exemple) make several measurements and get an average to compare with yours. I agree with Craig that having as thin shavings as one can reliably get is probably what you can ask for. to come back a second on the "piece of paper" behind the blade, is it a piece of paper/cushion that you put under the blade so that when you pass the wood on the blade it doesn't move back against the mouth of the plane? A little bit like something you put behind a door to prevent it from hitting the wall behind?
  9. robertdo

    Center join

    I don't think you can precisely measure a difference of 2 or 3 microns (that is 0.002mm) with a vernier, especially on a wood stripe. Imagine that 2 microns is more or less the size of a bacterium.
  10. Would'nt this mean that few thousands pianos will be destroyed?
  11. I think also that the "exaggerated" arching of the top (over 20mm?) might be a clue. A clue of what, I don't know, but I am certain JSaunders will tell you soon...
  12. Since I am no expert I won't tell you what it is, but indeed it doesn't look anything like the real Stainer violins one can see on the web. What makes you think it is a very old violin?
  13. robertdo

    Center join

    What I don't understand is how you can get such a curve along the piece of wood other than getting a sligthly curve sole of the plane? If the blade itself if convexe (or concave) what you should have is a convexe or concave wood but from one edge to the other (across the width), while being perfectly flat from one side to the other?
  14. robertdo

    Center join

    Why do you think the wooden one would not do the job? It seems to me to be the best suited of the three for making the center joint.
  15. robertdo

    Center join

    Of course there is always the solution to use only one piece backs...
  16. robertdo

    Center join

    that's a nice video, but I would be curious to see the same with a piece of maple. For the violin I never found the spruce planing to be problematique. It's smooth and you don't really need to push to hard to slice into it like in butter. But each time you come across a flame on a piece of maple it means the grain changes direction. And of course this makes a difference. I find it more athletic...
  17. robertdo

    Center join

    together with a shooting board like the one Craig is using (and since I also found it could be hard to push a well figured maple piece of wood against the plane simply by hand) I just made a simple "bed" (in fact a flat plank with three sides, one of which becomes a handle) to put the wood inside. It get much easier to push the wood regularly that way.
  18. there was a mini crash today or yesterday because China closed one of its bitcoin exchange platform. But it's not the first time it happens and curiously the bitcoin value seems to increase each time even more rapidly. Go figure... Edit. I hadn't seen Bernie's post .
  19. robertdo

    Center join

    Even without the consideration about the center joint moving if both plates are planed at the same time, I can imagine planing a 5cm thick spruce piece of wood along the length, but a 5cm thick maple one seems pretty hard job, no?
  20. Maybe it's wood coming from a very "twisted" part of a tree, like a root?
  21. robertdo

    Center join

    Rubbing and no clamp is ok and easy for the top spruce, but is it the same for the back maple?
  22. robertdo

    Center join

    But I guess it takes 2 person to rub the joint?
  23. robertdo

    Center join

    Most likely with a plane well sharpened and honed, and hide glue. Given that woodworkers can make perfectly matching center joints simply holding the plane in their hands (I still can't believe they can do that) I suppose violin makers of that time were trained to do the same.
  24. Given that the soundpost is usually positionned relative to the bridge, is it ok to move the bridge 0.5mm north, south east or west to see the effect moving the soundpost would have if moved the same way (or rather a symmetrical way?) So for minimal move, is it possible to simply move the bridge?
  25. Again, I am still not sure of what we are discussing about here. Any possibility to get a sound clip? For example I am not sure a E string (that is a high tension steel string) can ring as freely as a lower fat perlon wounded G string. If it's only a power problem, you can still use a metal A string.
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