Julian Cossmann Cooke

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About Julian Cossmann Cooke

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    Enthusiast
  • Birthday 10/19/1955

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    http://www.cossmannviolins.com
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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Austin, TX
  • Interests
    Making; restoration; psychoacoustics; grounds and varnishes; aesthetic and tonal development of the violin family instruments form

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  1. Jeff is a cyborg. He'll be doing this until the end comes. And just before that, he will blast off in what he has disguised as his cabin and take up residence -- along with Maestronet -- on another habitable planet where the native species sports two heads, allowing a single virtuoso to play both parts of Bach's D minor concerto to an audience twice the size of what a hall normally would accommodate because every one has four ears. I may have a future as a futurist.
  2. FWIW at this point in the thread, this is precisely the method I used on an instrument made by one of our MN colleagues -- a beautiful instrument, I might add. It was an oil varnish and between the micromesh and the spirit/oil on a rag, the imprint leveled nicely and took the polish to the point where the spot was gone and the varnish matched the rest of the instrument.
  3. Although I have found him to be very unshelfish about sharing his knowledge.
  4. Go with the pros. A lot of folks use Joe Robson's system or Eugene Holtier's. I make my own, but if I didn't, I'd probably use one of theirs. Or both and alternate! This is not a paid endorsement. That said, I do have a lot of respect for the extensive, hard-earned knowledge they bring to their work.
  5. The reference would not have been for your benefit -- you need no buttressing (no pun intended) on that front -- but for that of the assembled multitude. I will follow your lead, O Cloak-ed One.
  6. Anyone familiar with this book? I am particularly intrigued by the promise of previously unpublished notes written in the course of working on 17th and 18th century Italian instruments.
  7. Reminds me of an old PA Dutch expression: The hurrier I go, the behinder I get.
  8. Ha! I do use Everclear rather than denatured alcohol, but make a point of not drinking it. At least not since college.
  9. Does UV also work on sticky buns? (That one is such a gentle lob, it probably still is floating toward the plate for you to knock over the fence, David.) Though in that case, I have found the gooier the better.
  10. Is the purpose of the Drano to dissolve the cat hair that has found its way into the shellac?
  11. Right you are. 55mmx12mm. Don't know how 22 got in my head on the short walk from the bookcase to the laptop...
  12. FWIW, the Stradivari labels "reproduced" in the Hills book measure roughly 22mmx12mm. But the dimensions in the book are not quite uniform. In their volume on the Guarneri family, many of the labels look large by comparison, but that doesn't mean the reproductions are not to scale. In a previous thread, Bruce Carlson indicated that Stradivari's labels did not vary by instrument size.
  13. I'm sure others who are more experienced with Michelman will respond. My concern is about your referencing sandpaper for polishing. Are you talking about sandpaper between coats of varnish? If so, you might try putting a drop of mineral oil on the paper before using it which will help with the friction issue -- assuming the varnish is dry enough for sanding. Or water in lieu of oil for a more aggressive leveling. Sanding with sandpaper as a means of polishing after the final coat of varnish has been applied sounds overly aggressive. A fine abrasive like rottenstone, on the other hand, is used by some of the folks here on MN and you can find some instructive threads by googling maestronet[colon] and the name of the material about which you want to read.